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Rebalancing Development + Community Building Projects: Reconstructing Post-disaster Japan

Rebalancing Development + Community Building Projects: Reconstructing Post-disaster Japan | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Nearly two years have passed since "3.11", Japan's worst disaster since the Pacific War. Now, twenty months later, we can start to see the kind of future that Japan has entered, and the values and visions that are animating its architects, designers, and artists in this period of reconstruction and renewal.

At the heart of the reconstruction challenge that Japan faces is the question of the relation between the centre and the periphery, or to put it in starker terms, between the strong and the weak. This relation is expressed in many ways – between global forces or state authority and local people; between the metropolis and the countryside; between the victims and the spared. The earnestness with which metropolitan architects have engaged local communities only underscores this asymmetry. Beyond the immediate response to disaster, what many in Japan are seeking is the rebalancing of a long legacy of uneven development.


Via Lauren Moss
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A House with an Origami-Like Roof

A House with an Origami-Like Roof | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
In Japan is a tent-like home with an unusual roof that looks as if it has been folded like origami. It keeps the family safe during storms and earthquakes.

In the Mie Prefecture of Japan situated in a old village surrounded by mountains is the ORIGAMI house, designed by TSC Architects. The design centers around a roof that appears folded like origami. The architect wanted the form of the house and the roof to feel like one body. The side with the sharp peak has numerous windows to look out to the mountains, while also keeping the interior filled with sunlight.

The design also allows for plenty of covered outdoor space while also controlling the amount of light and wind that enters the house.


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Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Located in a residential area in Hyogo Prefecture, the house was designed for a family with two children. “The residents requested that, as the area has short hours of sunlight in winter, they’d like to bring in as much light as possible,” said Yo Shimada of Tato Architects.


More from the architects:

I wanted to create light, stable indoor climate and came up with a plan of three sheds of house type arranged on a 1.8 m high foundation platform. The first floor was lowered by 760 mm below ground to optimize the heating system and regulate temperature, while preserving views to the surrounding mountains and sky for the entire residential neighborhood.

The bathroom shed and the sunroom shed provide lighting and ventilation for the lower floor and form an overhead courtyard. The sunroom collects heat in winter, and exhausts heat in summer through the five motor-operated windows.

Corrugated polycarbonate panels are used for outer walls of the three sheds to take in solar radiation, with moisture and water-absorbing sheets between the panels and structure.The inside of the walls are formed with a heat insulating layer, and the ceiling and walls of bathroom are further filled up with light transmitting thermal insulation material of reproduced PET bottles.


A house appearing as small as a peasant’s work shed of an innovative material as corrugated panels creates a new vernacular in this agricultural area. Read the article and view more photos of this very unique house that connects new and old within the rural landscape.


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11 Boxes: Modular steel boxes create a structurally sound house in Japan

11 Boxes: Modular steel boxes create a structurally sound house in Japan | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Keiji Ashizawa Design is an architectural and product design studio based in Tokyo, Japan. In their work their focus on ‘honest’ design – simple yet refined, thoughtful and of a light manner, and this is surely the house to feel safe in during an earthquake.

"In order to maximize space on site, a simple construction method is chosen. 11 steel frame boxes are formed using steel angles and used as the main structure while external wall panels are attached on without the need of any additional structure. The size of the steel boxes needed to be considered carefully as it has to fit on a truck to be transported to site. These boxes are then joined together with high tension bolts on site. Though the central span holds the main structural strength of the building, the circulation stair is intentionally positioned there to operate as an earthquake-proof element as well as to rationalize the plan of the house."


Via Lauren Moss
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B House in Shimasaki by Anderson Anderson Architecture

B House in Shimasaki by Anderson Anderson Architecture | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

This hillside cabin in Japan by Anderson Anderson Architecture generates energy using photovoltaic panels and a ground-sourced heat pump.


Despite being surrounded by electricity pylons, this cabin by San Francisco firm generates all its own energy and heating using photovoltaic panels and a ground-sourced heat pump. Named B-House, the single-storey building is positioned on a slope overlooking Kumamoto.

The house was built on a tight budget and sustainability was key to the design. “The extremely modest budget required a close collaboration of the architects and builder to achieve a high quality, off-site fabricated timber frame construction meeting high sustainability standards,” explain the architects.


Read more about the sustainable features of this unique contemporary home and view more images at the article link...


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
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Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Located in a residential area in Hyogo Prefecture, the house was designed for a family with two children. “The residents requested that, as the area has short hours of sunlight in winter, they’d like to bring in as much light as possible,” said Yo Shimada of Tato Architects.


More from the architects:

I wanted to create light, stable indoor climate and came up with a plan of three sheds of house type arranged on a 1.8 m high foundation platform. The first floor was lowered by 760 mm below ground to optimize the heating system and regulate temperature, while preserving views to the surrounding mountains and sky for the entire residential neighborhood.

The bathroom shed and the sunroom shed provide lighting and ventilation for the lower floor and form an overhead courtyard. The sunroom collects heat in winter, and exhausts heat in summer through the five motor-operated windows.

Corrugated polycarbonate panels are used for outer walls of the three sheds to take in solar radiation, with moisture and water-absorbing sheets between the panels and structure.The inside of the walls are formed with a heat insulating layer, and the ceiling and walls of bathroom are further filled up with light transmitting thermal insulation material of reproduced PET bottles.


A house appearing as small as a peasant’s work shed of an innovative material as corrugated panels creates a new vernacular in this agricultural area. Read the article and view more photos of this very unique house that connects new and old within the rural landscape.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.