PROYECTO ESPACIOS
2.1K views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

The Floating House by MOS Architects

The Floating House by MOS Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The Floating House is the intersection of a vernacular house typology with the shifting site-specific conditions of this unique place: an island on Lake Huron. The location on the Great Lakes imposed complexities to the house’s fabrication and construction, as well as its relationship to site.

Annual cyclical change related to the change of seasons, compounded with escalating global environmental trends , cause Lake Huron’s water levels to vary drastically from month-to-month, year-to-year. To adapt to this constant, dynamic change, the house floats atop a structure of steel pontoons, allowing it to fluctuate along with the lake.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
scarlettarch's curator insight, July 13, 2014 8:23 AM

simple elegant functional

Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

A House with an Origami-Like Roof

A House with an Origami-Like Roof | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
In Japan is a tent-like home with an unusual roof that looks as if it has been folded like origami. It keeps the family safe during storms and earthquakes.

In the Mie Prefecture of Japan situated in a old village surrounded by mountains is the ORIGAMI house, designed by TSC Architects. The design centers around a roof that appears folded like origami. The architect wanted the form of the house and the roof to feel like one body. The side with the sharp peak has numerous windows to look out to the mountains, while also keeping the interior filled with sunlight.

The design also allows for plenty of covered outdoor space while also controlling the amount of light and wind that enters the house.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Think Small: Renzo Piano's Vitra House

Think Small: Renzo Piano's Vitra House | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Vitra’s carefully curated campus in Weil am Rhein, Germany, contains works by Herzog & de Meuron, Frank Gehry, FAIA, and Jean Prouvé, among other top-tier designers. Now the venerable Swiss furniture company has added a tiny prefab house by Renzo Piano Building Workshop to the mix. In 2013, Vitra unveiled Diogene, a 43-square-foot prototype.

In keeping with the no-frills lifestyle of its ancient Greek namesake, the philosopher Diogenes, the house consists of only one room. A slim, ultra-efficient layer of insulation is sandwiched between the cabin’s wood frame and aluminum skin. “The house is really minimal,” says Vitra project manager Aja Huber. “It’s a life where you have to think, do you want the sofa or the bed?”


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Cantilevered Two Hulls House Overlooking the Sea in Nova Scotia, Canada

Cantilevered Two Hulls House Overlooking the Sea in Nova Scotia, Canada | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Two Hulls is a detached house in Nova Scotia, Canada, that allows water to flow freely underneath the structure.

Floating above the sandy beach, Two Hulls is one of the many fascinating detached houses designed by  MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects. Cantilevered on concrete foundations, it allows the water to flow freely underneath the structure, without harming the house in any way. The perfect place to construct a seaside refuge home, the isolated plot of land, guarded by trees and lush vegetation on one side and the sea on the other,  offers mind-blowing views, encouraging a relaxing lifestyle...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

An Energy-Saving, Ecological Glass Box Above the Landscape

An Energy-Saving, Ecological Glass Box Above the Landscape | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Amsterdam firm Paul de Ruiter Architects designed a home to provide a comfortable environment all year round while minimising its energy use and impact on a site in a protected ecological area.

In order to build on the site, which is a habitat for many plants and animals, the owners were required to return what had previously been farmland to its original pre-agricultural state. They planted 71,000 young trees that will eventually obscure the house from view and added a rectangular pond above the underground storey.

Energy-saving techniques employed in the building include a fabric screen built into the insulated glazed facade that can be rolled down to reflect the sun, and create a void between the glass and the screen through which ventilation flows. Wood from the private forest will be burned to heat water for the house once the trees have matured, while photovoltaic cells on the roof and a planned windmill will generate electricity.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

D*Haus: Dynamically Responding to its Environment

D*Haus: Dynamically Responding to its Environment | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Conceived for the harsh, climatic extremes from ‘Lapland to Cape Horn and Aleutians to Auckland’ The D*Haus concept can respond dynamically to its environment by controlled adaptation to seasonal, meteorological and astronomical conditions.


D*Dynamic can ‘metamorphosize’ and transform itself into 8 Configurations, adapting from winter to summer, and day to night by literally moving inside itself. The thick heavy external walls unfold into internal walls allowing glass internal walls to become facades. Doors become windows and vice versa. The layout can be adapted to suit different living situations, as the design can change its shape and perspective both seasonally and throughout the course not only dawn to dusk but also twilight to sunrise....

One can rotate the house so that the user is in sunlight, while the house generates energy through solar panels. From a manufacturing point of view, the design deploys one set of materials to achieve so many possibilities...


'D*Haus designs are inspired by the philosophy of dynamic living: we truly believe in ideas that can help improve and inspire our daily lives. This can be done through flexibility, adaptability and originality.'


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Patrick Tay's curator insight, January 7, 2013 9:44 PM

Blending architectural, art and design.

Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Located in a residential area in Hyogo Prefecture, the house was designed for a family with two children. “The residents requested that, as the area has short hours of sunlight in winter, they’d like to bring in as much light as possible,” said Yo Shimada of Tato Architects.


More from the architects:

I wanted to create light, stable indoor climate and came up with a plan of three sheds of house type arranged on a 1.8 m high foundation platform. The first floor was lowered by 760 mm below ground to optimize the heating system and regulate temperature, while preserving views to the surrounding mountains and sky for the entire residential neighborhood.

The bathroom shed and the sunroom shed provide lighting and ventilation for the lower floor and form an overhead courtyard. The sunroom collects heat in winter, and exhausts heat in summer through the five motor-operated windows.

Corrugated polycarbonate panels are used for outer walls of the three sheds to take in solar radiation, with moisture and water-absorbing sheets between the panels and structure.The inside of the walls are formed with a heat insulating layer, and the ceiling and walls of bathroom are further filled up with light transmitting thermal insulation material of reproduced PET bottles.


A house appearing as small as a peasant’s work shed of an innovative material as corrugated panels creates a new vernacular in this agricultural area. Read the article and view more photos of this very unique house that connects new and old within the rural landscape.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

The Håkansson Tegman House by Johan Sundberg

The Håkansson Tegman House by Johan Sundberg | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Johan Sundberg designed the Håkansson Tegman house in Höllviken, Sweden. Angled around an inner garden, the design rests on the tradition of the Danish atrium house from the 60s and 70s. Three small bedrooms form the northern wing of the house, while the western wing is a continuous sequence of spaces consisting of a kitchen, dining room, library, living area, and winter garden.

The outer walls along the streets are clad with clay bricks as a screen. The stucture is a steel-enforced timber frame. Windows and sliding glass doors are made from Schüco aluminum profiles. The front and garage doors are custom made from ammonium smoked oak.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Omizubata N House in the Forest of Karuizawa by Iida Archiship Studio

Omizubata N House in the Forest of Karuizawa by Iida Archiship Studio | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The village of Karruizawa, Nagano Prefect, is a destination commonly sought after by Tokyo dwellers looking for a peaceful getaway. It’s easy to see the zen-like qualities a rural retreat like Omizubata N House offers its owners when they escape the city and its 13 million inhabitants. The interior of the oversized cabin is finished entirely with wood adding to the natural feel of the forest surroundings.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Elegant + Eco-Friendly Appleton Residence in Venice, California

Elegant + Eco-Friendly Appleton Residence in Venice, California | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Appleton is an elegant eco-friendly residence located in California. It features an uncluttered interior, connecting the inhabitants with the courtyard.

The orientation of the house was thought out to maximize passive solar design and natural ventilation. Every room is connected to the courtyard, allowing inhabitants to move freely from inside to outside. The use of natural materials softens the contemporary lines of the overall design, highlighting the connection to the exterior.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Maximizing Views with Minimal Environmental Impact: House Ufogel in Austria

Maximizing Views with Minimal Environmental Impact: House Ufogel in Austria | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

This Austrian house Ufogel is a functional home set on a hillside overlooking some of the best mountain views in the area, blending the comforts of a traditional house with the futurism of contemporary design. It is set on stilts to maximize spectacular views while minimizing the environmental impact of its construction. Windows, both small and large, provide light to every part of the building without sacrificing personal privacy, a consideration that’s often missed in the design of compact houses. The interior of the house is fairly minimal in style, dominated by a single wood finish and accented by clever little details in each room.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
I.B.G.-'s curator insight, January 7, 2014 2:42 AM

 ejemplo de eficiencia, funcionalidad y diseño ...

Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

A Prefab Timber-framed Bioclimatic House by Tectoniques Architects

A Prefab Timber-framed Bioclimatic House by Tectoniques Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
This "bioclimatic" house in France features a timber frame, larch and composite timber cladding, and a planted roof.

Lyon architects Tectoniques introduced a range of measures to maximise the environmental and thermal performance of the house -called Villa B - along a north-south axis, with plenty of glazing on the south facade helping with solar gain. The house is built using dry construction methods and features a prefabricated modular timber frame built on a concrete slab with larch cladding covering the exterior...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
ParadigmGallery's curator insight, November 26, 2013 12:12 PM

This home is fantastic. I found the description of the details of the build informative and interesting, giving me insight into the thought process that determines interior and exterior materials, the biorclimactic approach and more. Awesome images of the interior and exterior.

 

Michel Bastian's curator insight, November 30, 2013 3:50 AM

Bio-bio !

Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

D*Haus: Dynamically Responding to its Environment

D*Haus: Dynamically Responding to its Environment | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Conceived for the harsh, climatic extremes from ‘Lapland to Cape Horn and Aleutians to Auckland’ The D*Haus concept can respond dynamically to its environment by controlled adaptation to seasonal, meteorological and astronomical conditions.


D*Dynamic can ‘metamorphosize’ and transform itself into 8 Configurations, adapting from winter to summer, and day to night by literally moving inside itself. The thick heavy external walls unfold into internal walls allowing glass internal walls to become facades. Doors become windows and vice versa. The layout can be adapted to suit different living situations, as the design can change its shape and perspective both seasonally and throughout the course not only dawn to dusk but also twilight to sunrise....

One can rotate the house so that the user is in sunlight, while the house generates energy through solar panels. From a manufacturing point of view, the design deploys one set of materials to achieve so many possibilities...


'D*Haus designs are inspired by the philosophy of dynamic living: we truly believe in ideas that can help improve and inspire our daily lives. This can be done through flexibility, adaptability and originality.'


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Patrick Tay's curator insight, January 7, 2013 9:44 PM

Blending architectural, art and design.

Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Located in a residential area in Hyogo Prefecture, the house was designed for a family with two children. “The residents requested that, as the area has short hours of sunlight in winter, they’d like to bring in as much light as possible,” said Yo Shimada of Tato Architects.


More from the architects:

I wanted to create light, stable indoor climate and came up with a plan of three sheds of house type arranged on a 1.8 m high foundation platform. The first floor was lowered by 760 mm below ground to optimize the heating system and regulate temperature, while preserving views to the surrounding mountains and sky for the entire residential neighborhood.

The bathroom shed and the sunroom shed provide lighting and ventilation for the lower floor and form an overhead courtyard. The sunroom collects heat in winter, and exhausts heat in summer through the five motor-operated windows.

Corrugated polycarbonate panels are used for outer walls of the three sheds to take in solar radiation, with moisture and water-absorbing sheets between the panels and structure.The inside of the walls are formed with a heat insulating layer, and the ceiling and walls of bathroom are further filled up with light transmitting thermal insulation material of reproduced PET bottles.


A house appearing as small as a peasant’s work shed of an innovative material as corrugated panels creates a new vernacular in this agricultural area. Read the article and view more photos of this very unique house that connects new and old within the rural landscape.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.