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Water Balloon Room by Torafu Architects at Konica Minolta Plaza Gallery, Tokyo

Water Balloon Room by Torafu Architects at Konica Minolta Plaza Gallery, Tokyo | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
The Water Balloon installation at the Konica Minolta Plaza Gallery in Tokyo was created by Torafu Architects for the Eco & Art Award 2014 exhibition.

Each light bulb is made by hand using glass recycled from fluorescent lamps. As a result, no two Water Balloons have the same shape. Moreover, the bubbles inside each unique shape help produce a distinctive ethereal light.

 

More images at the link.


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Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
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Solar Carve Tower at the High Line | Studio Gang Architects

Solar Carve Tower at the High Line | Studio Gang Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Chicago-based architect, Jeanne Gang, just unveiled the latest project planned to border New York City’s beloved High Line. The 180,000 square-foot office tower with ground level retail will replace an existing, disused meatpacking plant along 10th Avenue between 13th and 14th streets. It will feature a glass facade that is intelligently shaped to avoid the disruption of light, air and views from the High Line.

The gem-like façade displays the exciting architectural potential of expanded notions of solar-driven zoning—and a skyscraper that enhances the public life of the city in ways that a stand-alone icon cannot. 

Dubbed the Solar Carve Tower, the mid-rise structure is currently pending city approval and is planned for completion in 2015.


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The Glass Farmhouse by Olson Kundig Architects

The Glass Farmhouse by Olson Kundig Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

From the architects:

Located in Northeast Oregon, this small house is conceived as a contemporary glass box that floats atop the surrounding wheat fields. The design of the house and the accompanying wood-frame barn responds to the local vernacular of barns and farmhouses in the Pacific Northwest while responding to the client’s deep interest in the design of Philip Johnson’s Glass House.

Facing south towards the distant mountains, the house adapts well to the cold, snowy winters and hot, dry summers. In the winter, the orientation takes advantage of passive solar heat gain from the low-angled winter sun; in the summer, roof overhangs and a light shelf block the high hot summer sun from entering. Large, operable windows of high-efficiency glass provide cross-ventilation cooling, lessening the house’s need for air-conditioning.


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Responding to the Landscape: Archipelago House by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

Responding to the Landscape: Archipelago House by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The goal for this project was to provide a direct relationship with the dramatic archipelago landscape and to create a simple platform which would offer several diverse readings of the relationship between space and nature. Conceived as a light-weight construction in wood and glass and located in Stockholm’s outer archipelago, this summer house was built within the specific conditions prevailing on the island.

Without any car access, all materials had to be brought by boat from the mainland. Wood was chosen throughout the design in order to provide simplicity of construction and to minimize difficulties with heavy transportation.

The horizontal character of the black-stained exterior relates to the verticality of the island’s tall pines, and mirrored views of the Baltic Sea. The geometry of the plan is generated by the specifics of the site; the house sits on a flat surface between two rocky outcrops, and is oriented simultaneously towards the sun in south and towards sea views in the west. With smaller rooms placed behind, the three large social areas of the house open up to the terrace and provide an open platform, criss-crossed by sliding glass...

 

Visit the article link for more images, as well as additional details on the sustainable strategies incorporated into the design and construction of this modern home...


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