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Innovative Interior Features Dynamic Spaces, Hammock Seating and Modular Furniture

Innovative Interior Features Dynamic Spaces, Hammock Seating and Modular Furniture | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

When the studio Ruetemple created a room in a Russian home meant for a young brother and sister, they didn’t take a conventional approach to the design. The two-storey space, called Interior for Students, needed to be a place for the kids to study, sleep, and hang out with their friends.

So, architects Alexander Kudimov and Daria Butahina filled it with some fun details like a mezzanine hammock and a moveable cube. They built a fixed space for school work and dynamic areas for play using none of your typical furniture.
The lower level of the 108 square-foot room features a modular seating and sleeping cube on wheels. It can be arranged as a trio of sofas, as a long continuous line, or even closed up and made into a room within a room. Fixed office furniture occupies the other side of the space, and it includes desks, cupboards, shelves, and a staircase. All items are made from the same materials so that they appear as one cohesive piece of furniture.


Via Lauren Moss
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'Coodo' Mobile Living: A Modular Structure That Adapts To Its Natural Surroundings

'Coodo' Mobile Living: A Modular Structure That Adapts To Its Natural Surroundings | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The coodo opens a whole new way into nature, called Mobile Living. Smaller and less costly than a traditional house, the structure consists of less material, requires less land and can be situated in places that normally would not be buildable.


A coodo's fundament consists of a standardized frame construction upon which individual surfaces, colors, appliances, furniture and decoration can be applied. These personal design choices can be changed by the next owner because the coodo is designed as a modular system.


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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, November 22, 2013 2:05 AM
The coodo opens a whole new way into nature. We call it Mobile Living.
First off, the coodo is smaller than a house and hence cheaper because it consists of less material, needs less land and can be situated in places that normally would not be buildable property.
Sílvia Dias's curator insight, November 22, 2013 9:40 AM

cool!

Susan Schuler Blake's curator insight, November 22, 2013 4:27 PM

Pra toró de miolo...

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Modular Eco-resort Integrated into the Portuguese Landscape

Modular Eco-resort Integrated into the Portuguese Landscape | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Seven suspended micro-houses — each one resulting from a different combination of three modules — delicately hover above the ground in the Portuguese eco-resort of Parque de Pedras Salgadas.


Portuguese architects Luís Rebelo de Andrade and Diogo Aguiar have recently completed the set of houses in the north of Portugal. The small dwellings are suspended on pillars, completely integrated within the surrounding nature.

Designed in a modular, prefabricated system with different combinations of the same three modules — entrance/bathing, living, sleeping for an extremely flexible solution, able to adapt to diverse spaces within the park, creating different morphologies and diverse dialogues with the surrounding nature.

Each of the houses features a large window framing a specific view of the park, bringing the surrounding nature inside, and linking the interior to a balcony and ideal resting space. Each dwelling's cladding evokes local, vernacular construction techniques...


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Adaptable Architecture: Meeting Dome by Kristoffer Tejlgaard & Benny Jepsen

Adaptable Architecture: Meeting Dome by Kristoffer Tejlgaard & Benny Jepsen | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Canadian architects Kristoffer Tejlgaard and Benny Jepsen have slightly altered the mathematical elements of a geodesic dome to form a new modular pavilion.


By using different sized triangular frames with both spherical and perpendicular surfaces, a new lattice form was birthed from that of a traditional geodesic dome. The result is a method of construction that allows surfaces to be extruded, scaled, pushed and pulled while maintaining logic.
Through this altered composition, small niches and crevices opened. Steel footings connect the wooden frame, made of locally-sourced pine. Steel nodes were made to fit standard rafter sizes, making the whole design movable.
The façade's curved surfaces are covered with recycled wood panels, creating opaque faces. Perpendicular surfaces made of PVC film allow light to enter while opening views to the outside. The project was commissioned by BL (Denmark Public Housing) for the Peoples Meeting in Denmark.


Via Lauren Moss
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Hustadvika Tools by Rever & Drage Architects

Hustadvika Tools by Rever & Drage Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

At just 15-sq-m, this small project was designed to support a wide range of functions. Hustadvika Tools suits the client’s needs for a shelter to withstand rain and wind, a simple toolshed and a place to spend a night or two as close to nature as possible.
Sliding doors allow users to articulate the building configuration and setting and a glass wall frames views at the rear. A retractable roof unfolds to reveal a glazed ceiling.
Designed by Oslo-based architects Martin Beverfjord, Tom Auger and Eirik Lilledrange, the project is a dynamic intervention that skillfully shapes the users’ action and activities.


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D*Haus: Dynamically Responding to its Environment

D*Haus: Dynamically Responding to its Environment | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Conceived for the harsh, climatic extremes from ‘Lapland to Cape Horn and Aleutians to Auckland’ The D*Haus concept can respond dynamically to its environment by controlled adaptation to seasonal, meteorological and astronomical conditions.


D*Dynamic can ‘metamorphosize’ and transform itself into 8 Configurations, adapting from winter to summer, and day to night by literally moving inside itself. The thick heavy external walls unfold into internal walls allowing glass internal walls to become facades. Doors become windows and vice versa. The layout can be adapted to suit different living situations, as the design can change its shape and perspective both seasonally and throughout the course not only dawn to dusk but also twilight to sunrise....

One can rotate the house so that the user is in sunlight, while the house generates energy through solar panels. From a manufacturing point of view, the design deploys one set of materials to achieve so many possibilities...


'D*Haus designs are inspired by the philosophy of dynamic living: we truly believe in ideas that can help improve and inspire our daily lives. This can be done through flexibility, adaptability and originality.'


Via Lauren Moss
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Patrick Tay's curator insight, January 7, 2013 9:44 PM

Blending architectural, art and design.

Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
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D*Haus: Dynamically Responding to its Environment

D*Haus: Dynamically Responding to its Environment | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Conceived for the harsh, climatic extremes from ‘Lapland to Cape Horn and Aleutians to Auckland’ The D*Haus concept can respond dynamically to its environment by controlled adaptation to seasonal, meteorological and astronomical conditions.


D*Dynamic can ‘metamorphosize’ and transform itself into 8 Configurations, adapting from winter to summer, and day to night by literally moving inside itself. The thick heavy external walls unfold into internal walls allowing glass internal walls to become facades. Doors become windows and vice versa. The layout can be adapted to suit different living situations, as the design can change its shape and perspective both seasonally and throughout the course not only dawn to dusk but also twilight to sunrise....

One can rotate the house so that the user is in sunlight, while the house generates energy through solar panels. From a manufacturing point of view, the design deploys one set of materials to achieve so many possibilities...


'D*Haus designs are inspired by the philosophy of dynamic living: we truly believe in ideas that can help improve and inspire our daily lives. This can be done through flexibility, adaptability and originality.'


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Patrick Tay's curator insight, January 7, 2013 9:44 PM

Blending architectural, art and design.

Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Adaptable Architecture: Meeting Dome by Kristoffer Tejlgaard & Benny Jepsen

Adaptable Architecture: Meeting Dome by Kristoffer Tejlgaard & Benny Jepsen | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Canadian architects Kristoffer Tejlgaard and Benny Jepsen have slightly altered the mathematical elements of a geodesic dome to form a new modular pavilion.


By using different sized triangular frames with both spherical and perpendicular surfaces, a new lattice form was birthed from that of a traditional geodesic dome. The result is a method of construction that allows surfaces to be extruded, scaled, pushed and pulled while maintaining logic.
Through this altered composition, small niches and crevices opened. Steel footings connect the wooden frame, made of locally-sourced pine. Steel nodes were made to fit standard rafter sizes, making the whole design movable.
The façade's curved surfaces are covered with recycled wood panels, creating opaque faces. Perpendicular surfaces made of PVC film allow light to enter while opening views to the outside. The project was commissioned by BL (Denmark Public Housing) for the Peoples Meeting in Denmark.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.