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Construction starts on Smith and Gill's ice-inspired China skyscraper

Construction starts on Smith and Gill's ice-inspired China skyscraper | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Construction has started in Chengdu, China, on a 468-metre-high crystalline skyscraper by the architects behind the current and future tallest buildings in the world.

The Greenland Tower Chengdu was designed by Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill – the former SOM architects responsible for both the Burj Khalifa and the forthcoming Kingdom Tower – and is set to become the tallest building in south-western China. According to the architects, the faceted-glass form of the office and hotel tower was "inspired by the unique ice mountain topography around Chengdu".

"Like the mountain ridges reflecting the light of the sky and the valleys reflecting light from the earth, the iconic tower will perform as a light sculpture to diffuse light from 360 degrees, creating a connection between sky and earth," said the studio in a statement.


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Catherine Devin's curator insight, November 21, 1:59 AM

De nombreux projets "pharaoniques" en Chine, certains plus verts que d'autres ?  Voir peut-être aussi  :

http://www.gizmag.com/binhai-eco-city/33798/

 

Philippe Blot Lefevre's curator insight, November 22, 11:07 AM

Le seul moyen de s'approcher de la perfection de la Nature, est de l'imiter. Les formes et polyèdres platoniciens sont incontournables. L'effet n'est pas que visuel puisque notre corps est lui-même constitué de cellules apparentées à ces formes. Ainsi s'opère l'harmonie entre l'objet qui nous habite et ceux que nous côtoyons.

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Penda designs flexible bamboo hotel to connect guests with nature

Penda designs flexible bamboo hotel to connect guests with nature | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Design collective Penda has developed a concept for a flexible, portable hotel made from rods of bamboo, designed to bring guests closer to nature.

One With the Birds was developed by Penda – based in Vienna and Beijing – for the AIM Legend of the Tent competition in China, which challenged architects to develop low-impact tent-themed hotels offering a closer connection with the outdoors.

Penda came up with a concept for a flexible bamboo structure that can be easily expanded horizontally and vertically. Find more details at the article.

 



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A. Perry Homes's curator insight, July 15, 2:38 PM

FInally, our Swiss Family Robinson dream has come true, and we can vacation in the trees! 

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Sitting Lightly on the Land: House S in Vorderweissenbach

Sitting Lightly on the Land: House S in Vorderweissenbach | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

HPSA created ‘House S’ on a steep, rather small plot of land with excellent views. The owners required a cost efficient house with a maximum of 130 m⊃2;, of living space. A basement was not necessary so that the architects placed the whole building on pillars. 

The U-shaped floor plan responds to the neighbouring settlement. Living rooms and bedrooms are oriented to a terrace that offers great views of the surrounding hills. Because of the chosen typology the natural terrain could be untouched over the whole plot. In the garden the building offers a large, weather-protected area.


View more images at the link.


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Sustainability From Top To Bottom: Locally Sourced Timber Clad Homes

Sustainability From Top To Bottom: Locally Sourced Timber Clad Homes | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

When designing a home according to high standards of sustainability, an architect must consider all details of construction, from the way the structure absorbs and releases solar energy, to rainwater collection, to incorporating double-paned windows to reduce heat transfer.

They must also consider the environmental impact of the materials used to construct the home itself. Transporting resource-intensive materials across long distances significantly increases the home's overall carbon footprint.

To mitigate these adverse effects, the solution is much closer than one might think: opting for locally sourced and responsibly harvested timbers and woods. Instead of cutting down pines and oaks in sensitive forests to use for hardwood floors and cabinets, architects can make use of already fallen trees near the construction site to source their design needs. The following homes, façades, floors, and products come from wood found nearby, and are either left untreated for a rustic appearance or milled and cured on-site for a richer finish. Sustainability from start to finish.


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mickelin burnes-browne's curator insight, November 8, 2013 4:02 PM

Think Green and save the environment.

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Oakpass Residence by Heusch Architects

Oakpass Residence by Heusch Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The Oakpass Residence in Beverly Hillls resembles a sleek modernist box wrapped in floor to ceiling glass, 12 feet above the ground on 10 narrow columns. The structure was elevated to not only circumvent the stringent  setback requirements, but to minimize the impact of development on the beautiful natural site, heavily wooded with oak trees.

This resulted in more light for the interior spaces, views from every room, and more privacy. Also it created a space underneath the house- part carport, part Zen garden. The pool is also elevated on 3 columns and the heavy exterior west facing concrete wall acts as a passive solar heat storage element.

The interior and exterior spaces blend seamlessly into each other due to the use of frameless floor to ceiling glass and a continuity of materials from the inside to the outside.


View more images of this minimalist, passive and site-responsive home at the link...


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Adaptable Architecture: Meeting Dome by Kristoffer Tejlgaard & Benny Jepsen

Adaptable Architecture: Meeting Dome by Kristoffer Tejlgaard & Benny Jepsen | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Canadian architects Kristoffer Tejlgaard and Benny Jepsen have slightly altered the mathematical elements of a geodesic dome to form a new modular pavilion.


By using different sized triangular frames with both spherical and perpendicular surfaces, a new lattice form was birthed from that of a traditional geodesic dome. The result is a method of construction that allows surfaces to be extruded, scaled, pushed and pulled while maintaining logic.
Through this altered composition, small niches and crevices opened. Steel footings connect the wooden frame, made of locally-sourced pine. Steel nodes were made to fit standard rafter sizes, making the whole design movable.
The façade's curved surfaces are covered with recycled wood panels, creating opaque faces. Perpendicular surfaces made of PVC film allow light to enter while opening views to the outside. The project was commissioned by BL (Denmark Public Housing) for the Peoples Meeting in Denmark.


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Responding to the Landscape: Archipelago House by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

Responding to the Landscape: Archipelago House by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The goal for this project was to provide a direct relationship with the dramatic archipelago landscape and to create a simple platform which would offer several diverse readings of the relationship between space and nature. Conceived as a light-weight construction in wood and glass and located in Stockholm’s outer archipelago, this summer house was built within the specific conditions prevailing on the island.

Without any car access, all materials had to be brought by boat from the mainland. Wood was chosen throughout the design in order to provide simplicity of construction and to minimize difficulties with heavy transportation.

The horizontal character of the black-stained exterior relates to the verticality of the island’s tall pines, and mirrored views of the Baltic Sea. The geometry of the plan is generated by the specifics of the site; the house sits on a flat surface between two rocky outcrops, and is oriented simultaneously towards the sun in south and towards sea views in the west. With smaller rooms placed behind, the three large social areas of the house open up to the terrace and provide an open platform, criss-crossed by sliding glass...

 

Visit the article link for more images, as well as additional details on the sustainable strategies incorporated into the design and construction of this modern home...


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New “inflatable concrete” construction system is born in Austria

New “inflatable concrete” construction system is born in Austria | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Architects hoping to play with large, free-form concrete structures often get sent back, literally, to the drawing board because the complex timber formwork required is so expensive. But now a new, “inflatable concrete” system developed in Austria could restore some of that freedom by removing the need for formwork altogether.

Researchers at the Vienna University of Technology (VUT) this month announced the successful demonstration of a system that uses air cushions to push and bend newly-poured concrete slabs up into predetermined shapes..


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Norm Miller's curator insight, August 7, 2:31 PM

Interesting new technology for concrete

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A Modular, Geometric Cabin in Estonia

A Modular, Geometric Cabin in Estonia | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Designer-inventor Jaanus Orgusaar’s modular, hexagonal housing concept creates space in geometric patterns in the Virumaa region of Estonia.

The cabin utilizes a shape found in nature to create 270-square-foot modules that give the impression of a rounded interior due to a lack of acute angles.

Built a few years ago in a clearing near a pine and fir forest in the Virumaa region of Estonia, it serves as a summer home for his family. Made from sustainable materials by the Woodland Homes construction company, the building boasts warm interior walls painted with limestone paste, and a wooden exterior dyes with iron oxide. Though it’s currently just the right size for Orgusaar’s family, it easily expands with another module.


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Modular Folded Paper Chameleon Cabin Changes Color Depending on your Perspective

Modular Folded Paper Chameleon Cabin Changes Color Depending on your Perspective | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
This corrugated paper cabin by Mattias Lind is printed black on one side of the folds and white on the other so it looks different from either side.

In addition to the Chameleon Cabin's unique folded elevations, the two gable ends are also printed in corresponding shades so that the entire building looks black or white depending on which side it's viewed from. A bright yellow interior provides a contrasting warmth that also covers the window reveals.

The corrugated folds of the modules that form the walls and gabled roofline create a stable structure and are fitted together using a simple system of tabs and slots. A total of 95 modules were needed to assemble the building, which weighs approximately 100 kilograms and has a floor space of around seven square metres. The modular construction system could be used to produce buildings of any length.


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Modular Eco-resort Integrated into the Portuguese Landscape

Modular Eco-resort Integrated into the Portuguese Landscape | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Seven suspended micro-houses — each one resulting from a different combination of three modules — delicately hover above the ground in the Portuguese eco-resort of Parque de Pedras Salgadas.


Portuguese architects Luís Rebelo de Andrade and Diogo Aguiar have recently completed the set of houses in the north of Portugal. The small dwellings are suspended on pillars, completely integrated within the surrounding nature.

Designed in a modular, prefabricated system with different combinations of the same three modules — entrance/bathing, living, sleeping for an extremely flexible solution, able to adapt to diverse spaces within the park, creating different morphologies and diverse dialogues with the surrounding nature.

Each of the houses features a large window framing a specific view of the park, bringing the surrounding nature inside, and linking the interior to a balcony and ideal resting space. Each dwelling's cladding evokes local, vernacular construction techniques...


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Adaptable Architecture: Meeting Dome by Kristoffer Tejlgaard & Benny Jepsen

Adaptable Architecture: Meeting Dome by Kristoffer Tejlgaard & Benny Jepsen | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Canadian architects Kristoffer Tejlgaard and Benny Jepsen have slightly altered the mathematical elements of a geodesic dome to form a new modular pavilion.


By using different sized triangular frames with both spherical and perpendicular surfaces, a new lattice form was birthed from that of a traditional geodesic dome. The result is a method of construction that allows surfaces to be extruded, scaled, pushed and pulled while maintaining logic.
Through this altered composition, small niches and crevices opened. Steel footings connect the wooden frame, made of locally-sourced pine. Steel nodes were made to fit standard rafter sizes, making the whole design movable.
The façade's curved surfaces are covered with recycled wood panels, creating opaque faces. Perpendicular surfaces made of PVC film allow light to enter while opening views to the outside. The project was commissioned by BL (Denmark Public Housing) for the Peoples Meeting in Denmark.


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Sculptural architecture blurs the division between built form and landscape...

Sculptural architecture blurs the division between built form and landscape... | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Barwon Heads in Victoria is undergoing a period of significant change. Heritage restrictions currently protect older fishing shacks whilst the remainder of the seaside town is progressively being redeveloped.

The architecture now emerging is significantly contributing to the evolution of this small coastal township. The interesting circular building form of this house emerged from the architects Jackson Clements Burrows exploring circular forms, which resulted in a circular skylight over the first floor living areas and the overall shape of the house mirroring and immersing the structure into the Ti-tree dominated landscape.

The house is wrapped in a skin of vertical cedar battens, which not only provide privacy and solar protection but also blur the division between the built form and the landscape...


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Sculptural architecture blurs the division between built form and landscape...

Sculptural architecture blurs the division between built form and landscape... | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Barwon Heads in Victoria is undergoing a period of significant change. Heritage restrictions currently protect older fishing shacks whilst the remainder of the seaside town is progressively being redeveloped.

The architecture now emerging is significantly contributing to the evolution of this small coastal township. The interesting circular building form of this house emerged from the architects Jackson Clements Burrows exploring circular forms, which resulted in a circular skylight over the first floor living areas and the overall shape of the house mirroring and immersing the structure into the Ti-tree dominated landscape.

The house is wrapped in a skin of vertical cedar battens, which not only provide privacy and solar protection but also blur the division between the built form and the landscape...


Via Lauren Moss
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No comment yet.