Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal
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Mealworms could be tucker of the future.

Mealworms could be tucker of the future. | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it

Some Dutch researchers have come up with a novel idea (at least to Westerners) to save the planet - eat worms. Mealworms, to be precise - they're actually beetle larvae, or worms with legs.

Ana C. Day's insight:

EXCELLENT TITLE, that is exactly it !!! INSECTS are the TUCKER of the industry, like  The story of Preston Tucker, the maverick car designer and his ill-fated challenge to the auto industry with his revolutionary car concept. !!!!!

 

"If the same research that has gone into the larger farm animals can be put into the worms, then their potential is enormous"

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Ana C. Day's curator insight, January 17, 2013 3:26 AM

EXCELLENT TITLE, that is exactly it !!! INSECTS are the TUCKER of the industry, like  The story of Preston Tucker, the maverick car designer and his ill-fated challenge to the auto industry with his revolutionary car concept. !!!!!

 

"If the same research that has gone into the larger farm animals can be put into the worms, then their potential is enormous"

Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal
Insects as a sustainable commercial protein feed alternative for livestock.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Edible Insects for Animal Feed Market : Global Forecast over 2016-2024 – SAT Press Releases

Edible Insects for Animal Feed Market : Global Forecast over 2016-2024 – SAT Press Releases | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Edible insects for animal feed market has been segmented on the basis of insect type, form, application and geography. On the basis of type edible insects for animal feed market can be segmented into grasshoppers, flies, bees, wasps, worms, ants, beetles, and termites. Among these segments some of the key insect species used as feed are black soldier flies, silkworms and yellow mealworms. On the basis of form edible insects for animal feed market can be segmented into raw, dried, steam or fried and frozen. On the basis of application edible insects for animal feed market can be segmented into aquaculture, poultry and pets. Pet foods have seen an increasing demand for grasshoppers in dried as well as frozen forms. On the basis of geography edible insects for animal feed market can be segmented into Latin America, North America, Europe, Middle East and Africa and Asia Pacific.
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The Protein Bottleneck: Are Insects the Solution to the High Cost of Livestock Feeds? | NextBillion

The Protein Bottleneck: Are Insects the Solution to the High Cost of Livestock Feeds? | NextBillion | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Editor’s note: Throughout 2017, NextBillion is organizing content around a monthly theme, dedicating special attention to a specific sector alongside our broader coverage. This post is part of our focus on agriculture for the month of September.

Researchers argue that using food sources like fish and soybeans for purposes besides human consumption threatens food security and is unsustainable. Yet, according to a Food Agriculture Organization (FAO) study on the state of world fisheries and aquaculture, 16.3 million tonnes of fish produced were used to make fish oil and fishmeal feed for animals in 2012.

To address this growing problem, Kenya’s International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE) and Uganda’s Makerere University (MU) researchers have identified the Black Soldier Fly (BSF) larvae as a more nutritious option and apt substitute for conventional protein foods that make livestock feeds. The larva has more crude protein content than conventional fish and soybeans, which have 45 percent protein, according to a report by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC).

In Eastern Africa, Kenya and Uganda are pioneering the development of low-cost and nutritious insect-based poultry and fish feeds after a study into their viability yielded promising results. Led by researchers from ICIPE and MU, the study has identified the BSF as an insect whose larvae can be commercially processed to provide proteins and mineral ingredients required in poultry and fish feeds.
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Kenya and Uganda tap insects to make protein rich, low cost fish and poultry feeds

Kenya and Uganda tap insects to make protein rich, low cost fish and poultry feeds | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Researchers argue that using food sources like fish and soybean for non-food uses threatens food security and is unsustainable. According to a Food Agriculture Organization (FAO) study on the state of world fisheries and aquaculture, by 2012, 16.3 million tonnes of produced fish was used for nonfood uses like making fishmeal feed and fish oil.

To address that problem, ICIPE and MU researchers have identified the BSF larva as a more nutritious option and apt substitute for conventional protein foods that make livestock feeds. The larva has more crude protein content than conventional fish and soybean which has 45 percent protein, according to a report by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC).
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Effect of mealworms on broiler growth and organs

Effect of mealworms on broiler growth and organs | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Insects contain an interesting nutrient profile. But do chickens actually become healthier when insect meal is added to the diet? Insect researchers delved into this.
Insect meal show promise as a new, alternative protein source for livestock. Currently, the considered most valuable insect species to be used in livestock feeds are Hermetia illucens L. (black soldier fly), Musca domestica L. (common house fly), Tenebrio molitor L. (yellow mealworm), Bombyx mori L. (silkworm) and several grasshoppers (Van Huis, 2013). In particular, Tenebrio molitor (TM) and Hermetia illucens have recently been used in poultry. However, the implications of their utilisation on poultry health and gut development are still very limited.

Larvae meal tested in female Ross chickens

The study described here, published in the Journal Animal Feed Science and Technology, was to evaluate the animal performance, haematochemical parameters, intestinal morphology and histological features of broiler chickens fed diets including Tenebrio molitor (TM) larvae meal. A basal diet based on corn meal, corn gluten meal and soybean meal was formulated and served as control (C) group, while 50, 100 and 150 g/kg full-fat TM larvae meal inclusion as a partial replacement of soybean meal, corn gluten meal and soybean oil constituted the three experimental treatment groups (TM5, TM10 and TM15). A total of 160 female broiler chicks (Ross 708) at one-day of age were randomly allotted to these four dietary treatments. Growth performance and haematochemical parameters were measured during 40 days and after slaughter, morphometric investigations were performed on the organs.
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The Maggot Masters, The Food Chain - BBC World Service

The Maggot Masters, The Food Chain - BBC World Service | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it

This week we’re in South Africa, picking up great big squirming handfuls of maggots. Could these unpalatable little creatures hold the answer to some big questions – what to do about the huge amount of waste going into landfill, and how to meet the world’s growing demand for a sustainable supply of farmed fish, pigs and poultry?

A company called Agriprotein thinks its fly farm is the solution. They've just won The Food Chain’s first Global Champion Award - which recognises innovative ideas that could have a longstanding impact on the way we produce or consume food. The Food Chain's Emily Thomas gets up close to their armada of over 9 billion flies in the first of two episodes to explore the potential of using insects as a protein source for animal and fish feed.

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OPINION: Eat a (farmed) fish, save the planet | Ensia

OPINION: Eat a (farmed) fish, save the planet | Ensia | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Fish meal provides protein for fish diets, but there’s no reason protein must come from fish meal. For instance, soy meal and even insect larvae (see here and here) substitute well for fish meal. Using them instead of fish meal helps break aquaculture’s dependence on marine ingredients.

With fish oil, the story is different. Fish oil provides aquaculture diets with required long-chain omega-3 fatty acids. In the ocean, plankton make long-chain omega-3 oils that travel through the food web, eventually ending up in the fish rendered to make fish oil. The aquaculture industry is devoting large efforts to find land-based ways to replace fish oil in aquaculture diets. Algae (see here and here), yeast, and plants (see here and here) have all been successfully developed as sources of essential omega-3 oils. As their production increases, they will provide alternatives to the fish oil-based omega-3 oils in fish diets.
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Mind the gap! Where the science meets the industry

Mind the gap! Where the science meets the industry | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it

Insect protein in the headlines

There are some fantastic developments on the horizon for the industry. One that keeps grabbing the headlines is the production of insect protein for animal feed. This is a great example and one that would not be so surprising if it worked because the gap between the science and the industry is minimal; in fact we are already feeding insects, look at the aquaculture industry.

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Hermetia illucens meal as fish meal replacement for rainbow trout on farm | Journal of Insects as Food and Feed

Hermetia illucens meal as fish meal replacement for rainbow trout on farm | Journal of Insects as Food and Feed | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Abstract
In a 7-week on-farm feeding trial rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were provided with a diet containing 28% mechanically de-fatted insect meal prepared from larvae of the black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (HIM) and compared to a control that received a certified organic and fishmeal based diet. In the test diet insect meal replaced almost 50% of the fishmeal. The whole experiment was conducted under practical conditions on an organically certified rainbow trout farm in Switzerland. Fish of initially 66.5±2.3 g body weight were grown to 125±4.5 g and assessed for their growth performance, as well as analysed for their proximate composition, feed conversion ratio, fatty acid contents and organoleptic properties. Improved lipid utilisation and decreased protein utilisation were observed in fish fed the HIM diet. Furthermore, in a controlled degustation no differences except a slightly darker coloration of fish fed HIM were observed. The experiment demonstrated that substantial replacement of fishmeal by insect meal is possible without compromising growth, feed conversion and product quality. However, the decreased protein utilisation efficiency in HIM fed fish might lower production efficiency when applied over a whole production cycle and not only over 7 weeks.
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Valorisation of organic waste material: growth performance of wild black soldier fly larvae (Hermetia illucens) reared on different organic wastes | Journal of Insects as Food and Feed

Valorisation of organic waste material: growth performance of wild black soldier fly larvae (Hermetia illucens) reared on different organic wastes | Journal of Insects as Food and Feed | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Abstract
Insects such as the black soldier fly (BSF; Hermetia illucens) are currently being promoted as an alternative protein source for animals and organic waste management agents. To play the dual roles sustainably, there is need to reduce reliance on wild BSF and develop an appropriate farming methodology for the insect. This study aimed at improving larvae production in a black soldier fly colony previously established from the wild in Kenya. The study explored the effect of four locally available organic wastes as feedstocks for production the black soldier fly larvae. Separate feeding trials on faecal sludge (FS), banana peelings (BP), brewer’s waste (BW) and restaurant food waste (FR) was done and their effect on BSF larvae growth rate, larvae weight, total prepupal yield in grams, crude protein and lipid (ether extract) content analysed.
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What’s new in the global animal feed industry?

What’s new in the global animal feed industry? | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it

NextAlim to raise capital for insect meal production
The French start-up NextAlim is raising funds from SUEZ Ventures, Dynalim, nutri.CIAB and other industry stakeholders in order to finance the construction of its first industrial unit in Poitiers, France. Since 2014, NextAlim has been developing expertise in the use of insects to turn food waste into proteins for the animal feed and green chemistry sectors. This capital increase allows NextAlim to keep growing while capitalising on the results of its prototype, developed as part of the CYCLAPROVE project. Since its foundation, more than €10 million has been invested in this ambitious project which will be industrialised in 2018.

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Danes to start large-scale production mealworms

Danes to start large-scale production mealworms | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
A new project from Aarhus University in Denmark and partners will look at the use of organic by-products and waste products to raise insects on a large scale.
The use of insects in animal feed is one potential solution to improve the sustainability of animal diets as insects can be an alternative for the currently (less sustainable) used proteins. The European Union recently permitted the use of insect meal in aquafeed. For other food producing animals, insect protein is not yet allowed, but hopefully will be in the near future. The application in human food has gained increased interest over the last years. Whole insects for human food consumption are sold in specialty shops or further processed in hamburgers for example. They are, however, still a niche product.
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We will not eat the bugs. Here's who should.

We will not eat the bugs. Here's who should. | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
So could insects offset grain as the main course in animal feed? Scientists think so. In a 2013 research review, UN experts sang the praises of the black soldier fly. Unlike houseflies, adult black soldier flies aren’t vectors of human disease, and they’re not attracted to our habitats. They reproduce swiftly, inhibiting the growth of bacteria and keeping odors to a minimum. The flies can breed everywhere from farms to dense urban areas and can turn almost any organic matter into larvae—something we won’t eat but farm animals will.

The benefits might not stop at the water’s edge. Two-thirds of America’s salmon are farmed: One pound of salmon takes up to five pounds of wild-caught forage fish—sardines, anchovies, and others that may be overfished, imperiling oceanic food chains. But soldier fly larvae contain almost as much protein as fish meal and are less carbon-intensive to produce. With about 20 percent of global fish meal going to pig feed, scaling up larvae production could make raising both land and sea creatures easier on the oceans.
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Young Champion of the Earth: Viraj Sikand

Meet Viraj Sikand, a Young Champions of the Earth North America Regional Finalist.
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French supermarket Auchan to sell insect protein fed trout

French supermarket Auchan to sell insect protein fed trout | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
nnovaFeed, an insect protein and oil manufacturer with a production site in the north of France and an R&D hub in Evry, near Paris, is collaborating with the French supermarket chain to develop a ‘more sustainable and responsible aquaculture industry’.

The two organizations signed a Joint Declaration of Intent for Aquaculture on Tuesday (October 17) in Paris.

Feed components are central to their objective, they said, with insect protein providing an alternative to the finite fishmeal supply as the aquaculture sector continues to expand.


Auchan Retail France and InnovaFeed sign official aquaculture partnership agreement in Paris
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The State of AgriFood Tech Startups in Europe - AgFunderNews

The State of AgriFood Tech Startups in Europe - AgFunderNews | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Europe is also home to a small number of insect farming groups aiming to provide protein replacement ingredients for animal feed, particularly fishmeal. Protix out of the Netherlands raised one of Europe’s largest funding rounds in H1, and the largest ever for an insect farming startup, with a $50 million Series B. Ynsect is farming mealworm to produce a fishmeal placement and raised $15.2 million in a Series B funding to scale up its robotics-enabled insect factory in France. Hexafly is another example of an insect farming startup targeting fishmeal, which raised just over $1 million after taking part in the IndieBio EU accelerator in Ireland where the startup is based.
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Upcycler AgriProtein set to fly with 20 farms in U.S. and Canada – Real Agriculture

Upcycler AgriProtein set to fly with 20 farms in U.S. and Canada – Real Agriculture | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Self-proclaimed ‘waste-to-nutrient upcycler’, AgriProtein, is set to build 20 farms in the United States and Canada — fly farms, that is.

The company started building its first commercial-scale factory in 2014. Just two years later, it announced the securement of 17.5 million USD in capital just to fund expansion in Europe, North America and Asia. Now, it’s working towards a global target of 100 fly farms by 2024 and 200 by 2027.

The insect farms are being awarded for using organic waste to produce a protein substitute to fishmeal, which is used in aquaculture, agriculture, and petfood formulations.

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BBC Food and Farming Awards 2017

BBC Food and Farming Awards 2017 | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Agriprotein's Jason Drew celebrates his win
The winner of The Food Chain Global Food Champion Award gives us his thoughts
i'd like to thank Mother Nature for having tried and tested this process after the last million years... the flies always been part of our past, and now they're part of our future!
Jason Drew
Agriprotein
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Former Gold Coin exec takes role as Agriprotein Americas CEO

Former Gold Coin exec takes role as Agriprotein Americas CEO | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
The waste-to-nutrient upcycler said it aims to build a network of 100 insect protein factories by 2024 and 200 by 2027, supplying the $100 billion aquafeed market.

The company has moved its global HQ to London, and in July 2017 brought in Mark Williams as group COO and Alan Corr as group CFO.

Formerly Head of Nomura Investment Banking in Asia, Williams was previously with UBS in Hong Kong for ten years. As COO of Agriprotein, he will drive the global roll-out of new factory projects, hiring senior talent and engaging with financial markets as the company continues to grow, the firm said.
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Insect-based technologies: How buzzing is lending a hand

Insect-based technologies: How buzzing is lending a hand | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Flies as waste managers

Next Protein is another Tunisian startup that has its eyes on flying insects but for a different purpose. Rather than producing food, the startup is concerned about the exact opposite: the disposal of it.

Certain kinds of flies, specifically the black soldier fly larvae, have the ability to effectively consume organic waste and digest it into protein. The benefits are threefold: protein-rich larvae is later harvested and processed into a protein feed for livestock, poultry and fish, its fat gets extracted to produce biofuels, and the leftover from the waste is used as organic fertilizer.

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The New Economy of Excrement

The New Economy of Excrement | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it

Gounden and his colleagues heard that a certain fly species could make much more valuable products than compost. Flies are normally a health hazard because they feed on both human faeces and food, transmitting pathogens as they flit back and forth. But the black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens), which is native to tropical climates, is different: it feeds voraciously in its larval stage, when it stays more or less in one place, and not at all as an adult, making it much less of a health risk.


The fly was put to work on food waste by a Cape Town-based firm, AgriProtein. It developed factories to harness the fly's special habits. The company breeds flies in cages, hatches the eggs in a nursery and then transfers the larvae to the food waste, where they eat their fill. Two weeks after hatching, the larvae naturally migrate off the waste to pupate, making both them and the remaining compost easy to harvest separately. The factories dehydrate the larvae to make an animal feed or extract a fatty oil, which has a range of uses from cosmetics to biodiesel. The leftover organic matter becomes a soil conditioner. Last year, AgriProtein opened the first industrial-scale plant of this type, with a plan for worldwide expansion close behind.

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Nuffield Scholar talks of benefits of insects for hens

Nuffield Scholar talks of benefits of insects for hens | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Feeding insect protein to laying hens has the potential to take off around the globe but further technical knowledge of entomology is crucial for its viability.
Nuffield scholar Dr Aidan Leek said there was growing evidence that the former small-scale and niche sector was turning into an industrial and mainstream operation.

Dr Leek, poultry nutritionist with Trouw Nutrition, said there had been more research papers in the field since a major conference at the University of Wageningen in 2014 than ever before. French firm Ynsect and Canadian company Entomo Farms were leading the way in industrial production.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Current rules for insect protein in hens inconsistent

 

The regulatory use of insect protein for hens was currently rather inconsistent, he added. Canada had allowed insect protein in broiler feed since 2016 and 1 firm was looking to build 20 factories across north America. But, in the United States the use of distillers grains and meat and bonemeal meant that there were questions over the economic viability of using insects.

Asia and Africa: Less hurdles for insect protein

In Asia and Africa there were fewer hurdles to overcome due to less regulatory controls and lower costs of production, such as labour and energy, as well as protein shortage. One South African company was planning to build 100 fly farms by 2024 and 200 by 2027, each producing 5,000 tonnes per annum of protein. The firm was looking to relocate to London."

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Protix Acquires Fair Insects and Diversifies by Adding Mealworm, Cricket and Locusts to Its Portfolio

Following the 45M€ funding in June 2017, Protix has acquired Fair Insects. Fair insects is a consortium breeders that have a long history and experience in growing mealworm, cricket and locust. Through this acquisition Protix will be more able to serve customers within the whole spectrum from B2B to food markets with products like protein rich foods, meat replacements and health beverages.

Protix envisions a world with food for all living creatures in balance with nature. Since 2009, Protix has developed cutting-edge technologies and sustainable insect based products that unlock new opportunities for our customers. Insects offer a low-impact protein alternative that can be cultivated sustainably. This is important as global populations continue to grow and the increased demand for meat and fish have devastating consequences like climate change, deforestation and overfishing.
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Insects as food and feed: from production to consumption | Insects as Food and Feed

Insects as food and feed: from production to consumption | Insects as Food and Feed | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Editors: Arnold van Huis and Jeffery K. Tomberlin

Published: 2017  Pages: 448

eISBN: 978-90-8686-849-0 | ISBN: 978-90-8686-296-2

Description
Alternative protein sources are urgently required as the available land area is not sufficient to satisfy the growing demand for meat. Insects have a high potential of becoming a new sector in the food and feed industry, mainly because of the many environmental benefits when compared to meat production. This will be outlined in the book, as well as the whole process from rearing to marketing. The rearing involves large scale and small scale production, facility design, the management of diseases, and how to assure that the insects will be of high quality (genetics). The nutrient content of insects will be discussed and how this is influenced by life stage, diet, the environment and processing. Technological processing requires decontamination, preservation, and ensuring microbial safety. The prevention of health risks (e.g. allergies) will be discussed as well as labelling, certification and legislative frameworks. Additional issues are: insect welfare, the creation of an enabling environment, how to deal with consumers, gastronomy and marketing strategies. Examples of production systems will be given both from the tropics (palm weevils, grasshoppers, crickets) and from temperate zones (black soldier flies and house flies as feed and mealworms and crickets as food).
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New Australian cricket farm gets green light

Grubs-Up, a cricket farm in Western Australia is currently selling insects for human consumption, but animal feed is also an option.
The Australian website ABC rural reports that this farm has now officially been given the green light to sell their insects for human consumption. This makes it the 2nd edible cricket farm in Australia to enter the market with their products.
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Heading towards total replacement of fish meal

Heading towards total replacement of fish meal | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
The potential of insect meal for aquafeed is huge and trials showed that Tenebrio molitor meal (mealworm meal) can effectively replace fish meal and blood meal in the diet of juvenile Nile tilapia. Results of a 3 month study are presented here.
The ingredients used in aquafeed are generally based on fish meal and soybean meal but are considered nowadays as non-sustainable to feed farmed fish. Novel sources of proteins are thus necessary to replace or partially replace conventional ingredients for which there is an increasing demand due to the intensification of farming methods. Several studies have shown that insect-based ingredients could be a good candidate as fish meal alternative (see review by Henry et al, 2015). As of 1 July 2017, the EU Regulation 2017/893 has authorised the use of insect proteins in aquafeed from seven insect species including the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor.
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North America | Young Champions of the Earth

North America | Young Champions of the Earth | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Sustainably Powering the Future of Feed
Kulisha works with food producers to convert organic waste into insect protein for use in animal feeds. We divert food waste from landfills, using it instead as a feedstock for black soldier fly larvae. These are then harvested as an alternative protein to fishmeal. This simultaneously reduces pressure off oceans, as the demand for fishmeal is driving vast overfishing.
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