Protein Alternati...
Follow
Find
23.8K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Ana C. Day
onto Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock
Scoop.it!

Mealworms could be tucker of the future.

Mealworms could be tucker of the future. | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it

Some Dutch researchers have come up with a novel idea (at least to Westerners) to save the planet - eat worms. Mealworms, to be precise - they're actually beetle larvae, or worms with legs.

Ana C. Day's insight:

EXCELLENT TITLE, that is exactly it !!! INSECTS are the TUCKER of the industry, like  The story of Preston Tucker, the maverick car designer and his ill-fated challenge to the auto industry with his revolutionary car concept. !!!!!

 

"If the same research that has gone into the larger farm animals can be put into the worms, then their potential is enormous"

more...
Ana C. Day's curator insight, January 17, 2013 3:26 AM

EXCELLENT TITLE, that is exactly it !!! INSECTS are the TUCKER of the industry, like  The story of Preston Tucker, the maverick car designer and his ill-fated challenge to the auto industry with his revolutionary car concept. !!!!!

 

"If the same research that has gone into the larger farm animals can be put into the worms, then their potential is enormous"

Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock
Insects as a sustainable commercial protein feed alternative for livestock.
Curated by Ana C. Day
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Insect Feed Companies - 4ento

Top 10 Insect Feed Companies - 4ento | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
Insect feed for animals is now a reality. Find out which companies are leading the way and how they are producing revolutionary insect based products.
more...
Jean-François Kleinfinger's curator insight, April 2, 2:50 AM

C'est plutôt les 10 plus actives en communication ...

Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Everything you always wanted to know about fish farming but were afraid to ask

Everything you always wanted to know about fish farming but were afraid to ask | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
In the end, Young says, like a lot of aquaculture’s challenges, “it’s going to come down to economics.” Yes, fish meal and fish oil are expensive — they’re limited resources and laborious to produce, but that means that producers will have to figure out how to use them as efficiently as possible. Even the farmed species that require on the omega-3s in fish oil can be fed a diet that largely consists of other proteins, like soy- or algae-based feeds, with just enough oil to make everything run smoothly.

And researchers are constantly looking to dig up new alternatives to both fish meal and oil — things that might be even lighter on the land, like insects, or genetically modified flax, or yeast-grown omega-3 oils that can be churned out in fermenting vats with almost no waste at all.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

This PROteINSECT Consensus Business Case: ‘Determining the contribution that insects can make to addressing the protein deficit in Europe’ is endorsed by the organisations represented below. - pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Dayton Business Journal reveals winners for the 2015 Innovation Index Awards - Dayton Business Journal

Dayton Business Journal reveals winners for the 2015 Innovation Index Awards - Dayton Business Journal | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it

The institute won the overall innovator of the year, given to the top vote-getter among the individual category winners.

Roughly 200 people attended the awards gala, featuring many of the top innovators in the region.

The DBJ has formed a partnership with the Dayton Development Coalition for these awards, which are designed to select the best individuals, teams and companies who discovered innovative approaches and solutions to fuel the region’s economic engine.

The Miami Valley boasts a rich history of innovators and these awards are designed to give recognition to the innovators of today.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Your Dog Should Eat Crickets… Yes, Crickets – But It’s Not What You Think

Your Dog Should Eat Crickets… Yes, Crickets – But It’s Not What You Think | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it

When I first heard about the idea of making pet treats out of crickets, it caught my attention.  I had visions of the smelly little creepy crawlers that my parents fished with when I was a girl.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"Chloe’s Treats are clean as well as green.  They contain no additives. The ingredient list is simple and Jack says that he taste tests each batch. I like that someone takes a personal interest in what goes into these goodies. I love that the treats were developed with a personal dog in mind. If your dog has special dietary needs, you can know that Chloe’s Treats are free of grains, corn, soy, dairy, egg, and gluten (Although it is important to note that very few dogs have a gluten sensitivity). The crickets are all raised for human consumption.  The source farms feed primarily wheat germ based medium to the crickets and sometimes offer apples and cinnamon to flavor the end product."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day from Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Scoop.it!

What the Latest Avian Flu Epidemic Teach to Insect Farmers?

What the Latest Avian Flu Epidemic Teach to Insect Farmers? | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
In the first half of 2015 the egg production industry in USA has been hit hard with avian flu epidemic causing the staggering loss of 11 percent of the hen population all across the country. In act...
more...
Ana C. Day's curator insight, July 18, 4:17 AM

".............For long time the traditional farming has ignored the unethical and hazardous (and money making) living environments of the animals as they have been able to counter the downsides by heavy use of medication on the animals. As it has now been seen again with the latest case of the avian flu, it just might be so that this is not the right way to go. Fortunately, the insect farming industry does not even have this option simply because such thing as insect medication does not exists. For this reason the best option for insect farmers is to first of all provide the insect the best possible environment to lower the risk exposure of pathogen breakout. Secondly, use Risk Pooling meaning that the insect colonies are divided in the multiple separate locations so that in case the risk does occur, it does not affect the whole colony right away."

Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Feeding of live insects - Insect Protein and the Layer Industry. Potential Input or Product

Feeding of live insects - Insect Protein and the Layer Industry. Potential Input or Product | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
Everyone on their Nuffield studies will have a light bulb moment and so far, I've had several but this one burns the brightest! Much of the interest and excitement in insects as a feed source has f...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Much of the interest and excitement in insects as a feed source has focused on them as a high volume sustainable protein source from processed meals. For sure there seem to be other interesting properties like the oil composition (BSF being high in lauric acid which has interesting nutritional properties), chitin (which also has some functional properties) and other undefined “antimicrobial factors” possibly associated with the digestive secretions and defensive secretions of the growing larvae (interesting that larvae applied to infected wounds will help to heal them). However, my studies so far have raised some questions in my mind – when the meals are processed are some of these properties lost and would there benefits, beyond simply what can be defined by ‘nutrition’ to feeding a live insect. Some as yet unpublished work seems to suggest there might be ‘interesting effects’ and more than one group in different countries that I have visited are considering this subject. In September I visit China and will visit a layer farm (hopefully) where live feeding is done on a large scale. For anyone that has every observed........."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Aquaculture's Explosive Growth Means Farmers Are About to Run Out of Fish Food - Press Release - Digital Journal

Fish meal and fish oil are the lifeblood of the aquaculture feed industry, and demand is growing at 8% annually. The demand for fish meal will nearly double by 2025, creating a need for over one million tons of alternative high-protein meal.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"

  • The majority of fish meal alternatives are in their infancies today. Alternatives like insect protein, recycled waste, and algae face challenges like low production capacity, high cost, and consumer aversion that make them unrealistic protein sources for aquaculture feed today."
more...
Cheryl Preyer's curator insight, July 16, 10:23 AM

The need for insect meal continues to grow.

Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Dutch experiment: Feeding live insects to chickens

Dutch experiment: Feeding live insects to chickens | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it

Dutch feed producer ForFarmers and the Department of Entomology at Wageningen UR, the Netherlands have together launched a trial in which broiler chickens are being fed live insects.

Ana C. Day's insight:

KIRSTEN GRAUMANS


"Insects are rich in protein. With this trial, both parties want to investigate whether the broiler chicks grow healthy and at the right pace when they receive live insects as an addition to the feed.

The trial is being carried out at the ForFarmers pilot plant in Nijkerk, the Netherlands with 1,000 chicks. The animals are divided in to 4 different groups, allocated 4 different diets.

The parties involved hope to make a positive step forward regarding sustainability by encouraging chickens in their natural behaviour. The first results are expected at the end of September. Even if the results are positive, it will take some time before this feeding regime will be implemented in practice, because its application is fairly costly."

more...
Olivo de la Sierra 's comment, July 16, 2:42 AM
Completely insane as regards welfare rules !
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

| AgriProtein: the company using flies, our waste to keep the planet from eating itself

| AgriProtein: the company using flies, our waste to keep the planet from eating itself | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
Based in Cape Town, the company uses flies to recycle organic waste into protein that can be used for animal feed.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The problem with nature is that it is slow. Way too slow for our overpopulated, capital-driven world of today. But if AgriProtein co-founder Jason Drew has his way, we could soon find a way to balance capitalism and environmentalism.

Based in Cape Town, the company uses flies to recycle organic waste into protein that can be used for animal feed."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

EXPO 2015 - EU @ Expo Milan 2015 - Research & Innovation - European Commission

EXPO 2015 - EU @ Expo Milan 2015 - Research & Innovation - European Commission | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
European Commission - Research & Innovation: EU @ Expo Milan 2015 - Presentations from Research & Innovation Events at EXPO 2015
Ana C. Day's insight:

The challenge: 9 billion mouths to feed, 70% more food needed by 2050 yet fertile soil, fresh water, animal feed and fish stocks are dangerously low . This clip shows how EU funded research and innovation projects provide sustainable, systemic solutions to help farmers better align their use of soil to local conditions, preserve precious water, find new sources of protein and improve the efficiency of European aquaculture.

This interactive presentation allows you to find out more detailed information on the projects addressing this challenge.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Latest research on insects for animal feed

Latest research on insects for animal feed | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
More research papers are being published about the use of insects in feed. However, you need the volumes to be able to incorporate them in large amounts of compound feed. But how efficient do insects grow on animal manure? The answers are found in the latest edition of the Journal of Insects as Food and Feed, published by Wageningen Academic Publishers.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"If larvae are reared on manure from livestock production, and subsequently reused as animal feed, this could decrease the environmental impact of the livestock sector. Furthermore, this would decrease the need for feed imports, and thereby the pressure on unsustainable sources of dietary protein currently used, such as fishmeal or soybean meal.

High survival rate of insects

Therefore, an experiment was conducted to compare the suitability of chicken, pig, and cow manure as feed for larvae of the black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens (L.); Diptera: Stratiomyidae). Newly hatched larvae were inoculated on moistened manure (33% dry matter). Water and dried manure were added three times per week, until the first prepupae appeared. It was shown that survival was between 82 and 97%, indicating that the tested substrates were suitable (Table 1).+

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

AgriProtein announces creation of world’s largest farm

AgriProtein announces creation of world’s largest farm | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it

Ontario, Canada (PRUnderground) July 3rd, 2015

AgriProtein has announced today that it has selected North America as the location to build the world’s largest fly farming operation. The first three facilities alone will house more than 30 billion flies. By headcount this will be the largest farming operation on the planet.

Ana C. Day's insight:

AgriProtein is the global leader in the emerging nutrient recycling industry. It farms flies that are fed on organic waste material. The fly larvae are then harvested and dried into MagmealTM, a natural and sustainable high-quality protein feed for chicken and fish that replaces fishmeal in industrial farming operations.

Independent academic research has tested and proven the efficiency of MagMealTM in a range of farmed animals. The company has received product approval in a number of jurisdictions and believes that Magmeal™ will achieve AAFCO/FDA and CFIA acceptance as an animal feed within 24 months.

Most organic waste in North America still goes to landfill and pollutes the environment. AgriProtein diverts this waste to its fly farming operation, reducing greenhouse gases and producing larvae meal. The process helps increase food security and preserve marine stocks.

Magmeal™ is targeting the existing $12 billion fishmeal market.

“Within fifteen years we will consider it as normal to recycle our waste nutrients as we do our paper, cans and glass today. The benefits to the environment, our seas and food security are immense”, says Jon Duschinsky, CEO of AgriProtein North America.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

A Startup That Feeds Fly Larvae To Livestock… and Other New Cleantech Startups Debuted At Google[x] — Medium

A Startup That Feeds Fly Larvae To Livestock… and Other New Cleantech Startups Debuted At Google[x] — Medium | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it

After extensive testing, a species of black soldier fly proved to be the most efficient at gobbling up piles of compost and laying larvae by the thousands. Harnessed by the creative power of the cleantech sector, these protein-packed progeny have a unique destiny. They will be pelletized and used as animal feed which, according to the entrepreneurs behind Prota Culture, could disrupt millions of dollars in the food waste disposal market, and turn trash into treasure.

The Hawaii-based Energy Excelerator (EEx), who organized a recent demo day at Google[x], where Prota Culture pitched, has introduced their 2015 cohort.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

What the hake? B.C.'s largest fishery is turning fish into fish meal

What the hake? B.C.'s largest fishery is turning fish into fish meal | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
Few Canadians know that the largest fishery on B.C.'s coast is for Pacific hake. Although it's a food-grade fish, the federal government granted permission last week, for the first time in nearly 30 years, to allow catches to be converted into fish meal.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Hake is a schooling fish related to the more commonly known haddock and cod. The Canadian hake fishery this year is allowed to catch 114,000 metric tonnes, equivalent to about a billion meal servings. Over the past decade most of B.C.'s hake was sold to Russia, but an economic embargo of Canadian products into Russia means B.C.'s hake can't be sold to this market. Because the B.C. hake industry products and market are not diversified, the solution for this year's catch is to sell it to a reduction plant, where food-grade hake is ground to make fish meal, most likely for farmed Atlantic salmon.

Under the Fisheries Act, it is illegal to use fish in this manner unless the fisheries minister grants an exemption. On July 24, Fisheries and Oceans Minister Gail Shea granted such an exemption to the hake fishery, allowing it to convert about half its allocation— or 55, 000 tonnes (equivalent of roughly 55,000 pickup trucks full of fish) — into food for other agricultural products."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

We met Antoine Hubert, CEO of Ynsect and awarded Innovator Under 35 by the MIT

We met Antoine Hubert, CEO of Ynsect and awarded Innovator Under 35 by the MIT | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
Each year since 1999, MIT Technology Review, the journal from the top-rank US University, discovers new generations of Innovators Under 35. The awarded young leaders are developing new technologies to solve the major global challenges of today in remarkably different ways and impacting the lives of millions of people around ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day from Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Scoop.it!

▶ Why eating bugs will soon become the new normal | Jenny Josephs | TEDxSouthamptonUniversity - YouTube

Published on Jul 20, 2015

A mouthful of mealworms may not be your first thought when hungry, but perhaps you will think differently after this fascinating talk from Dr Jenny Josephs in which she makes a compelling argument for why in the not too distant future eating insects will become the new normal.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Mystery Meat Is About to Get a Lot More Mysterious

Mystery Meat Is About to Get a Lot More Mysterious | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
For millennia, we’ve known where to find our protein: beef, chicken, fish, even soybeans and lentils. For some reason, though, we’ve always overlooked pond scum, houseflies and the bacteria that live off cow farts.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Insects are another possibility. On the plus side, they grow quickly and don’t need a lot of food or water in the process. Housefly larvae can quadruple their mass in four days. Researchers and entrepreneurs worldwide have even been raising them on waste products from other industrial processes. On the downside … well, people still think they’re gross, despite efforts by a few high-end chefs and other enthusiasts to make them more palatable. AgriProtein, based in South Africa, grows housefly and blue bottle fly larvae on organic food waste otherwise destined for the landfill, and sells them as feed protein for chicken, fish and pets. AgriProtein produces more than 20 tons of protein per day in its factory and has another six under construction. U.S.-based EnviroFlight is growing black soldier flies on various food wastes like the leftovers from beer brewing and ethanol production."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day from Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Scoop.it!

French Food Startup Aims To Sell

French Food Startup Aims To Sell | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
EVRY — With one hand, he holds a container crawling with beetle larvae: 2 centimeter-long, thin, brownish maggots. With the other, he proudly shows three others containing his products: flour packed with protein, oil rich in lipids, and chitin powder, a precious molecule derived from insect
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Hopping vs Hoping | Ana Day | TEDxAmRingSalon - YouTube

Ana shares some good ideas and thoughts, why we shall consider insects as a new and broad source on our nutrition plan. Ana is a dynamic and resourceful desi...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Insect Feed Could Be the Next Frontier in Animal Agriculture

Insect Feed Could Be the Next Frontier in Animal Agriculture | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
Bugs may offer an environmentally friendly alternative to soy and fishmeal when it comes to feeding livestock
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Philip Taylor knew that when the black soldier fly began mating under artificial light in his hatchery at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research in Boulder, Colorado, something important was happening.

“For the mass production of larvae there needs to be a large and consistent source of eggs,” he explains. Taylor, a fellow with Duke University and INSTARR, needs a lot of larvae for his investigation into how insects can be used as an alternative protein source in animal feed."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

AgriProtein: The company using flies, our waste, to keep the planet from eating itself | GeekTime

AgriProtein: The company using flies, our waste, to keep the planet from eating itself | GeekTime | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
Based in Cape Town, the company uses flies to recycle organic waste into protein that can be used for animal feed
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Fast-forward seven years, and the innovative nutrient recycler today sits with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and a handful of prestigious awards from WWF to Innovation Prize for Africa — all recognizing its vision of becoming a leader in the nutrient recycling industry.

It’s topping these milestones off with over $11 million raised from Australia’s Twynam Group and Germany’s Oliver Group to build the world’s first two commercial fly farms."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

| AgriProtein: the company using flies, our waste to keep the planet from eating itself

| AgriProtein: the company using flies, our waste to keep the planet from eating itself | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
Based in Cape Town, the company uses flies to recycle organic waste into protein that can be used for animal feed.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Drew tells Ventureburn that while most of the multimillion dollar South African company’s tech is patented, it is not all that unique: “It’s just natural and perfected by Mother Nature. We simply industrialised it!”

AgriProtein was cooked up back in 2008 when it was still safe to call it a startup. It soon after raised some seed funding and started working alongside Stellenbosch University for early R&D.

Fast-forward seven years, and the innovative nutrient recycler today sits with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and a handful of prestigious awards from WWF to Innovation Prize for Africa — all recognising its vision of becoming a leader in the nutrient recycling industry."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

L’élevage d’insectes gagne du terrain au Genopole d’Evry

L’élevage d’insectes gagne du terrain au Genopole d’Evry | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
« Le grillon, c’est comme le cochon, tout est bon dedans ! ». Le regard malicieux d’Antoine Hubert, directeur d’Ynsect reflète sa joie. Ce...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Il y a quatre ans, quatre chercheurs s’associent pour créer « Ynsect ». Leur idée ? Fabriquer des farines et des huiles à partir d’un élevage d’insecte. Leur constat est simple : d’ici 2030, il manquera 30 000 t de protéines pour un élevage destiné à la consommation humaine. Cette matière première de protéine crée chez Ynsect permettrait de constituer une base d’alimentation d’un panel d’animaux comme les cochons, les poules ou les chiens et les chats (mélangées à des croquettes). «On donne ce type de farine animale à des animaux consomment des insectes déjà naturellement. Ainsi on peut en donner au porc ou à la poule. On ne le fera pas pour la vache », promet l’entreprise."

more...
Olivo de la Sierra 's comment, July 9, 6:46 AM
30000 TONNES ? COMMENT OBTENEZ VOUS CE CHIFFRE?
Ana C. Day's comment, July 9, 6:55 AM
Dans ce cas particulier, je suis juste le messager, je vous invite à les contacter directement avec votre demande, http://www.ynsect.com ,meilleures salutations
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Bioaccumulation of heavy metals in the black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens and effects on its life cycle: Journal of Insects as Food and Feed: Vol 0, No 0

Bioaccumulation of heavy metals in the black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens and effects on its life cycle: Journal of Insects as Food and Feed: Vol 0, No 0 | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it
Abstract

In developing countries, effective waste management strategies are constrained by high collection costs and lack of adequate treatment and disposal options. The organic fraction in particular, which accounts for more than 50% of the waste production, constitutes a great, yet mostly neglected, reuse potential. Concomitantly, the demand for alternative protein sources by the livestock feed industry is sharply increasing. A technology that effectively transforms organic waste into valuable feed is therefore a timely option. Larvae of the non-pest black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens L. (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), may be used to reduce the mass of organic waste significantly. Concurrently, larval feeding converts organic waste into prepupae (last larval stage) which is high in protein. In combination with a viable market, this potential animal feed may cover the waste collection costs and thus promote innovative, small-scale entrepreneurs to establish a profitable business niche. Organic waste, however, often contains persistent pollutants, such as heavy metals, that may accumulate in the larvae and prepupae of black soldier flies and consequently in the food chain. In this study, we fed black soldier fly larvae chicken feed spiked with heavy metals (cadmium, lead and zinc at three concentrations each) to examine the extent of metal accumulation in the different life stages and the effect of heavy metal concentration in the feed on the life cycle determinants of the flies. The cadmium accumulation factor in prepupae (metal concentration in the body divided by metal concentration in the food) ranged between 2.32 and 2.94; however, the lead concentration remained well below its initial concentration in the feed. The bioaccumulation factor of zinc in prepupae decreased with increasing zinc concentration in the feed (from 0.97 to 0.39). None of the three heavy metal elements had significant effects on the life cycle determinants (prepupal weight, development time, sex ratio).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

World Fishing & Aquaculture - First four-star BAP shrimp for Latin America

World Fishing & Aquaculture - First four-star BAP shrimp for Latin America | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock | Scoop.it

“At Seajoy, we are proud to partner with Cargill in obtaining our fourth BAP star,” said Brad Price, the company’s vice president of operations and sales. “Together we are working to improve our feeding efficiencies as well as minimise our fishmeal requirements. To that end, we are in the second phase of testing an insect meal that we expect will replace 75% to 100% of our fishmeal sources.”

more...
No comment yet.