Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal
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Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal
Insects as a sustainable commercial protein feed alternative for livestock.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Is FAO turning its back on Edible Insects?: FAO’s Senior Forestry Officer Paul Vantomme retires! - 4ento

Is FAO turning its back on Edible Insects?: FAO’s Senior Forestry Officer Paul Vantomme retires! - 4ento | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Who doesn´t know Paul? The man behind Edible Insects to whom we look for advise and support! A personality in his own right, who has managed to create an amalgam between industry and academia, always making sure the sector will get to move forward. Well, after 25 years of FAO service, our guiding star takes his well-deserved retirement February 1st and I want to invite you to take two minutes to let him know how much his support and knowledge meant to you and your business or project over these years !! Thanks Paul for your #edibleinsect knowledge and support[...]
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Insect larvae as an additional source of protein for Europe's animal feed

Insect larvae as an additional source of protein for Europe's animal feed | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Europe currently imports 70 % of its protein for animal feed, putting it at risk from ever-growing competition for feed protein from a global population that is set to exceed 9 billion by 2050. Developing nations in particular are seeing a huge increase in demand for animal products, and there has been a five-fold increase in the total consumption of meat since the mid-1940s. The PROTEINSECT project believes that adapting European legislation to allow for the use of insect protein in animal feed will make a substantial contribution in addressing these challenges.
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Insects: spawning farming innovation

Insects: spawning farming innovation | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Increasingly, scientists are arguing that insects will have an essential role to play in the long-term prosperity and security of the world’s food supply. Initial economic opportunities to exploit insects, in particular as a source for animal feed, are beginning to be explored by a diverse group of people including scientists, farmers and innovative entrepreneurs, who recognise the potential in transforming organic waste products into a commercial product, which requires fewer land and water resources.

Food production principles are primarily linear, prioritising the yield and volume of goods, and efficiency of processes, rather than the overall effectiveness of a system. An estimated 30% of all food is wasted along the value chain, while 10% of the world’s population is classified as living in food poverty. Valuable nutrients are taken out of the soil without being returned, whilst the chemicals used in fertilisers and pesticides contribute to high levels of land degradation, which costs an estimated $40 billion worldwide annually. For livestock farming, the growing demand for high quality, reasonably priced meat has incentivised increased intensification and industrialisation of animal production, which stretches finite land and water resources further. Projected to exceed nine and a half billion by 2050, the world’s growing population is only likely to increase the scale of these challenges.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"There are around 2000 edible species of insects; they are usually high in protein and micronutrients, such as iron and vitamins, and they require less land and water resources to farm compared with other livestock. Insects are also a more efficient nutrient, being entirely edible, compared with livestock like chickens and cows, where only half of the animal can be consumed. Diets are of course culturally dependent; a range of insects from caterpillars to beetles is a regular food source for more than two billion people. In many parts of the world, personal distaste towards the idea of eating insects is a significant obstacle, which means that a more immediate opportunity to take advantage of the nutrients from insects might be in their utilisation as proteins in animal feed.

 

In 2014, 980 million tonnes of animal feed was produced, worth around $460 billion and increasing demand will surely lead to larger and larger volumes. Soymeal and fishmeal are the incumbent forms of feed, but each is arguably reaching limitations in current production, for example, 80% of the world’s soybeans are used to create feed, but cultivation requires very large amounts of land and water. It has been estimated that one hectare of land can produce one tonne of soy per year, the same area can produce over 100 tonnes of insect protein."

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EU: Insect protein use in aqua feed likely within 12 months, says industry insider

EU: Insect protein use in aqua feed likely within 12 months, says industry insider | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
DG Santé, the European Commission's Directorate-General for Health and Food Safety, is currently reviewing legislation to allow insect derived meal to be included in the diets of farmed fish, according to the IPIFF.
“This is finally happening. We can sense that the required regulatory change needed to enable the use of insect protein in aquaculture production is imminent.

"I have been cautious before in relation to timelines but from the amount of emails and internal discussions at Commission level, I can see there is real momentum behind efforts to lift the slaughterhouse amendment blocking the use of non-ruminant insect protein in aquaculture.

I would now expect the legislation to be in place within 12 months,” said Tarique Arsiwalla, vice president of the International Platform of Insects for Food and Feed (IPIFF), a consortium of insect-producing companies from the Netherlands, France, Germany among others.
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Grub's up: Would you eat meat raised on manure-munching maggots?

Grub's up: Would you eat meat raised on manure-munching maggots? | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Currently insects are considered to be "farmed animals" under EU legislation, meaning they cannot be fed to other farmed animals and are subject to prohibit rules on culling. PROteINSECT will today call for a review of this legislation.

Companies gearing up to produce and sell insects are keen for speedy legislative change, saying that if Europe takes too long in reviewing its laws, it will miss economic opportunities and end up importing meat from animals fed on insect protein from elsewhere anyway.

Have your say in the poll
Would you eat meat that had been raised on manure-munching maggots?
Yes
No
Yes, but only after safety tests
See results
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Animals may be fed manure-bred maggots to make meat sustainable

Animals may be fed manure-bred maggots to make meat sustainable | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Maggots raised on animal manure could provide a sustainable alternative to much of the feed given to farmed pigs, chickens and fish.

That’s the preliminary conclusion of PROteINSECT, a three-year study of whether feed based on fly larvae could help mitigate environmental problems caused by the rapidly growing global demand for meat and fish.

Some 14 per cent of the world’s ocean fish catch is fed to farm animals and growing demand for soya-based feed is driving deforestation and undermining staple food crop production in South America. With the global population set to exceed 9 billion by 2050, current farming methods look increasingly unsustainable.

Elaine Fitches of Fera Science, a company part-owned by the UK government, and coordinator of PROteINSECT believes insect-based feed could be part of the solution.
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Yellow Springs inventor exits coalition fund

Yellow Springs inventor exits coalition fund | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Glen Courtright, EnviroFlight president and chief executive, said he expects the company’s local workforce of about 17 to grow even as the venture looks for a production site harnessing Courtright’s process.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"EnviroFlight’s idea was to feed people with fish, and to cultivate fish with insects. The process also helps dispose of waste.

Roger Edwards, vice president of Accelerant Venture Capital Fund, said the Dayton Development Coalition-aligned Dayton Region Signature Fund was one of EnviroFlight’s early seed-stage investors."

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Yellow Springs biotech startup EnviroFlight celebrated - Dayton Business Journal

Yellow Springs biotech startup EnviroFlight celebrated - Dayton Business Journal | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
A pioneering Yellow Springs startup that intends to make food production more sustainable was celebrated by investors and Dayton officials.
The company EnviroFlight was recently acquired by West Palm Beach, Fla.-based Intrexon Corp., yielding a return for the investors that believed early on in the company. The company uses bugs digesting by-products like food waste in order to make animal feed and other nutrient products.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"EnviroFlight makes animal feed, fertilizer and other products by feeding black soldier flies by-products left over from brewing, ethanol production and food manufacturing.

"We solve two problems with a very tiny organism: We solve the feed problem and we solve the waste problem. So we truly believe that bugs do save the world," said EnviroFlight's president Glen Courtright, at a press conference Thursday at the Engineers Club in downtown Dayton."

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Best practices in the insect protein sector

Best practices in the insect protein sector | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Producing insects as a protein source, despite its challenges from regulations to consumer opinion, is a growing industry. But now it is time to take a closer look at specific insects; how to best produce them and what they can be used for.
Ana C. Day's insight:
"Volumes not meeting demands of animal feed sector

We can certainly say that the insect industry is no longer a new-born industry. Factories are popping up all around the world, but production capacities are still very far from the need of the animal feed industry. Beyond diversity of farmed species, production practices are also quite diverse which could make animal feed companies reluctant to collaborate with the insect industry. An example of production practices is the insect substrate selection. In many papers and research studies, insects are named as perfect convertors of recycling waste into proteins. However, the use of waste, such as manure, as a substrate to grow insect protein is not allowed by European regulation and not applauded by the feed industry."

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In Africa, Flies Are Bred for Sustainable Feed | RWL Water

As drought in Africa continues to challenge food and water supplies, entrepreneurs are meeting the challenge with novel, sustainable solutions including maggot farming, which, according to Reuters, provides a feed alternative for farmers and aquaculture operations. It also is being done in concert with wastewater treatment.
Ana C. Day's insight:
"Low Cost, High Quality

The feed produced is less expensive than conventional fish meal, a feed source which cost roughly $1,455 a metric ton in February 2016.

In contrast, flies can produce high-quality feed reliably at a low cost. Maggots consist of 65 percent protein and 25 percent fat, compared with 35 percent protein in soy-based feed, Victor Marufu of the Zimbabwe Organic and Natural Food Association told Reuters. His organization trains small farmers in maggot production. He estimates a single kilo of fly eggs produces roughly 190 kg of dried larvae.

Large-Scale Production

The production of feed maggots isn’t limited to small farmers.

Zim Earthworm Farms, which started its business in Zimbabwe by producing vermicompost, is going to market with a maggot-maize feed. It is being used for the farm’s chickens, but can also be used for pigs and fish.

In South Africa, AgriProtein harvests roughly 22 tons of black soldier fly (Hermetia Illucens) larvae each day. According to Time, these dried and processed larvae are worth roughly $10,000 as a poultry and fish feed."

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Insect feed conference will reveal pig trial outcomes | Pig World

Insect feed conference will reveal pig trial outcomes | Pig World | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
The results of feeding insect protein to pigs, poultry and fish will be revealed later this month during the final conference of the European Commission-funded PROteINSECT project which was set-up to encourage the exploitation of insects as a sustainable source of protein for animal feed and human nutrition.

Having combined research and farming expertise from China, Africa and Europe to encourage the adoption of fly larve protein into animal feed, PROteINSECT will reveal all during a final event in Brussels on April 27.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The trials have been carried out as part of the following five-point research plan:

  • The development and optimisation of fly larvae production methods for use in both developed and developing countries at small and large scale.
  • Determination of safety and quality criteria for insect protein products.
  • Evaluation of processing methodologies and the evaluation of crude and refined insect protein extracts in fish, chicken and pig feeding trials.
  • The determination of the optimal design of insect-based animal feed production systems utilising the results of a comprehensive life cycle analysis.
  • To build a pro-insect platform in Europe to encourage adoption of sustainable production technologies to include examination of the regulatory framework.

The conference is free.

Full conference details"

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Effects of dietary Tenebrio molitor meal inclusion in free-range chickens - Biasato - 2016 - Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition - Wiley Online Library

Effects of dietary Tenebrio molitor meal inclusion in free-range chickens - Biasato - 2016 - Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition - Wiley Online Library | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Ana C. Day's insight:
"Summary

Insects are currently being considered as a novel protein source for animal feeds, because they contain a large amount of protein. The larvae of Tenebrio molitor (TM) have been shown to be an acceptable protein source for broiler chickens in terms of growth performance, but till now, no data on histological or intestinal morphometric features have been reported. This study has had the aim of evaluating the effects of dietary TM inclusion on the performance, welfare, intestinal morphology and histological features of free-range chickens. A total of 140 medium-growing hybrid female chickens were free-range reared and randomly allotted to two dietary treatments: (i) a control group and (ii) a TM group, in which TM meal was included at 75 g/kg. Each group consisted of five pens as replicates, with 14 chicks per pen. Growth performance, haematological and serum parameters and welfare indicators were evaluated, and the animals were slaughtered at the age of 97 days. Two birds per pen (10 birds/treatment) were submitted to histological (liver, spleen, thymus, bursa of Fabricius, kidney, heart, glandular stomach and gut) and morphometric (duodenum, jejunum and ileum) investigations. The inclusion of TM did not affect the growth performance, haematological or serum parameters."

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EnviroFlight purchased by global company

EnviroFlight purchased by global company | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
EnviroFlight, the local company that developed a way to use black soldier fly larvae to process bio waste products into fish and animal food, has been purchased by Intrexon, a global company with a focus on synthetic biology.

“Current trends in human population growth drive increased demand for protein supply in food production, and we believe that BSF larvae provide the potential to revolutionize the animal feed industries,” said Intrexon Senior Vice President Corey Huck in a February 25 email.

The company, which has 700 employees worldwide, declined to state the purchase price.

Villagers should not see any immediate changes to EnviroFlight, which currently employs 17 people at its Millworks location. Founder and President Glen Courtright will continue to lead the company, Intrexon officials said.
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Possible green light for insect meal in 2016

Possible green light for insect meal in 2016 | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Best case scenario: approval at end of 2016

"At the meeting, DG SANTE and EU member state experts then held preliminary discussions on the possible 'next steps' towards the removal of the last regulatory barriers blocking the use of non-ruminant insect protein in aquaculture. Following these discussions, DG SANTE (the European Commission) should consider publishing legal proposals in order to revise these pieces of EU legislation. Once published, a qualified majority vote of Member States is required for these proposals to be adopted", says Hubert. Hubert emphasises that it is difficult to indicate precisely on when the 'green light' from Member States may be expected. In the best case scenario, this may happen before the end of the year.
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These entrepreneurs are using technology to turn a profit on food waste

These entrepreneurs are using technology to turn a profit on food waste | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
AgriProtein Technologies takes organic waste from food factories, restaurants and hotels, plus out-of-date produce from supermarkets, and creates larvae feed from it. They then feed the product to fly larvae, which in turn become food for chickens and farm-raised fish.

Drew says the process not only reduces food waste, but also turns a profit for the company while reducing the environmental footprint of raising chicken and fish.

“We take for granted the fact that we should recycle our glass, newspapers, tin, plastic and water. But this is only the tip of the iceberg. Creating and discarding nutrients … has a far higher environmental impact,” he says. “When we start to recycle these we will be truly on the path to some sustainability for our planet.”
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Best practices in the insect protein sector

Best practices in the insect protein sector | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
The variety of insects and their application

It is now time to look more into detail, like we do for other animals. For instance in farmed fish: salmon are very different from tilapia, seabass, barramundi or sturgeon. Selling prices are different, so are their taste. And of course their production technologies or feed requirements. This is exactly the same for insects. Beetles differ largely from flies, butterflies, cockroaches and crickets. Protein meal from some of these species will substitute fish meal in animal feed, while others will be more suitable as a substitute for meat and bone meal (such as high ash poultry meal).
Ana C. Day's insight:
"Knowing which insect meal fits which market

As the insect industry becomes more mature, it is time to delve deeper in to producing dedicated species and to formulate the market segments for more precise use of insect protein. This will give us a more accurate picture of this emerging industry. This could also be beneficial for marketing and communication purposes to tell a solid story about which insect proteins can be best implemented for certain markets. For example, herbivorous insects like crickets or beetles have better social acceptance in human food than detritivore insects."

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A glimpse at the recent insect meal trials

A glimpse at the recent insect meal trials | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Different animal species can be used to make insect meal, but mealworms, housefly and black soldier fly larvae are the most studies ones.
Although insect meal shows promise as a replacer of fish meal in aquaculture or soybean meal in livestock diets for example, the extra positive effects on performance and growth are not always there, as some of the studies have shown.
Ana C. Day's insight:
Aquaculture: fish meal versus insect meal

In 2015 the EU funded project PROteINSECT conducted fish feeding trials on 3,600 Atlantic salmon parr over an 8 week period using insect meal made from housefly larvae. The results indicated that as compared to parr reared on commercial diets, the common house fly larvae can provide a suitable meal which can be used to replace up to half of the fish meal without affecting fish performance or proximate compositions of the whole body. In addition, the defatted insect meal has potential to replace more than 50% of fish meal in salmon parr diets.

The company Ynsect in France looked at the effect of mealworm meal. They showed that a defatted insect meal (ynsect tmp-y465) could effectively replace 100% of fishmeal in the diet of juvenile rainbow trout with positive effects on the overall growth performance.

Another study, published in the Journal of Insects as Food and Feed, looked at catfish fed on a diet in which 50% of fishmeal was substituted with mealworm meal. The fish reached a final mean body weight significantly lower than that of fish fed on a fishmeal based diet. Specific growth rate showed a good value during the first month but then it decreased in both groups at the end of the second month, remaining at the end of the trial slightly higher in catfish fed on IM diet in comparison to those fed on FM diet.

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New whitepaper on insect protein for feed

New whitepaper on insect protein for feed | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Since 2013, experts from Europe, China and Africa have been investigating the use of two species of fly larvae in the diets of chicken, pigs and fish, carrying out feeding trials and analysing quality and safety of rearing farmed flies on organic waste substrates such as manure.
Ana C. Day's insight:

The document, titled Insect Protein – Feed for the Future: Addressing the need for feeds of the future today , encompasses safety, nutritional value, environmental impact, commercialisation and consumer acceptance of insect protein in animal feed.  It endorses two key actions:

•    A review of Regulation EC 999/2001 and Regulation EC 1069/2009, which prohibit a) the use of insects as a source of protein for animal feed for animals raised for human consumption; and b) the rearing of insects on manure or catering waste, respectively

•    A commitment to undertake the necessary research to ensure that the required evidence is available for the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) to carry out a full risk profile for insects reared on organic wastes (building on EFSA's 'Risk profile related to production and consumption of insects as food and feed' published in October 2015).

Dr Elaine Fitches, PROteINSECT project co-ordinator, says, "We are delighted to share our White Paper as a key stepping stone towards furthering our understanding of the potential for the use of insects in animal feed in Europe."

"The protein gap in Europe is a very real risk to social, economic and environmental progress," says Dr Fitches. "As we seek sustainable European long term solutions we must consider the benefits that the introduction of insects - specifically fly larvae - could have on the content of animal feed.  PROteINSECT believes these highly effective protein converters offer great potential for Europe to become global contributors to the provision of alternative and additional innovative protein sources."

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Professors share solutions to societal problems

Professors share solutions to societal problems | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Jeffery Tomberlin, an associate professor in the entomology department, who researches insects as a method for nutrient recycling. Tomberlin said that the world is running into a population overgrowth problem that will lead to more issues including malnutrition and human waste.
“By the year 2050, we should be close to 10 billion people,” Tomberlin said. “We need to figure a solution on how to feed this many people. We waste about 55 million tons of food annually — 40% of our food supply and food waste is responsible for 125 million tons of Greenhouse gases annually.”
On the other end of the spectrum, finding a way to deal with human waste is another rising problem in the world. Tomberlin said his solution to both issues will complete two steps — increase the sustainability of world fish production and decrease organic waste entering landfills.
“The answers are insects — specifically the insect of interest is the Black Soldier Fly,” Tomberlin said. “You can feed them a lot of food to produce protein. The reason we think insects are a viable option is because many fish we grow in the aquaculture industry rely on insects for a natural diet so it's an easy transition.”
Tomberlin has been performing research for eight years to test the types of manure to feed these insects. He said his team has found they can change the nutrient value of the larvae produced in the waste and select larvae for certain features and we can design insects for specific commodities.
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Are Insects the Key to Feeding 10 Billion People? > ENGINEERING.com

Are Insects the Key to Feeding 10 Billion People? > ENGINEERING.com | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Soy meal and fish meal are the major protein feeds for animals, and production is concentrated mainly in North and South America. One slide in Hubert’s presentation shows that by 2030 we might be at a 60 million ton deficit between protein requirements and protein production.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Insects are not currently marketed and sold as protein for a few reasons. The first reason is regulation, in Europe only plant based feed can be used for most food animals. The other reason is technology, because insect farming exists but not at a large efficient scale.

Hubert’s solution is Ynsect, a protein concentrate. Ynsect uses insects as the protein source, and Antoine points to the great biodiversity of the insect world as a strength. Insects can put any biomass waste to good use – our discarded food, wood waste from lumber operations, slaughterhouse waste, or household waste. "

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Bugs Save the World | Glen Courtright | TEDxFurmanU

Published on Apr 8, 2016
To solve a food problem and a waste problem, engineer and entrepreneur Glen Courtright turned to Black Soldier flies. His company found a way to process consumer leftovers into food for animals that can then be used as sustainable food sources for an increasingly populous Earth.

Glen Courtright, founder of EnviroFlight, is passionate about solving big problems.  He spent much of his career connecting the dots, asking questions, trying innovative ideas in order to create new and better solutions. His career spans telematics, wireless telecommunications, renewable energy, automotive, aerospace, and a few things from his military days that he really can’t talk about.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
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Intrexon : Local company to discuss venture capital success | 4-Traders

Intrexon : Local company to discuss venture capital success | 4-Traders | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
April 05--The creator of a technology meant to help feed millions will soon give his first public comments since his local company was acquired.

In February, Intrexon Corp. acquired Yellow Springs company EnviroFlight LLC to form a joint venture with Darling Ingredients Inc., the world's largest publicly traded developer and producer of sustainable natural ingredients from bio-nutrients.

EnviroFlight's idea was to feed people with fish, and to cultivate fish with insects.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The Dayton Development Coalition said a press conference is set for Thursday afternoon at the Dayton Engineers Club.

Glen Courtright is EnviroFlight's president.

"EnviroFlight has developed proprietary technologies which enable the rearing of non-pathogenic black soldier fly larvae in an industrially scalable manner," Intrexon said in February when it acquired the local company. "This innovative and responsible approach has considerable potential within the $60 billion global animal feed industry as it will provide an environmentally-friendly, toxin-free, sustainable source of high-value nutrients."

EnviroFlight has about 17 employees in Yellow Springs.

The press conference will also discuss how EnviroFlight recently exited venture capital support from the coalition's Dayton Region Signature Fund."

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PROteINSECT Conference - Insect Protein Feed for the Future

PROteINSECT Conference - Insect Protein Feed for the Future | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
PROteINSECT will present its international work, findings and results to demonstrate and share the knowledge it has generated to enabling the exploitation of insects as a sustainable source of protein for animal feed and human nutrition.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"PROteINSECT research focuses on five key areas in order to evaluate insects as a novel source of protein for animal feed and to ensure that methodologies are sustainable and economically viable.

  1. The development and optimization of fly larvae production methods for use in both developed and developing countries at small and large scale.
  2. Determination of safety and quality criteria for insect protein products.
  3. Evaluation of processing methodologies and the evaluation of crude and refined insect protein extracts in fish, chicken and pig feeding trials.
  4. The determination of the optimal design of insect-based animal feed production systems utilising the results of a comprehensive life cycle analysis.
  5. To build a pro-insect platform in Europe to encourage adoption of sustainable production technologies to include examination of the regulatory framework.

 

For full information about the PROteINSECT Project please visit our website www.proteinsect.eu or email us at info@proteinsect.eu."

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Dror Tamir's curator insight, March 31, 4:30 AM

"PROteINSECT research focuses on five key areas in order to evaluate insects as a novel source of protein for animal feed and to ensure that methodologies are sustainable and economically viable.

The development and optimization of fly larvae production methods for use in both developed and developing countries at small and large scale.Determination of safety and quality criteria for insect protein products.Evaluation of processing methodologies and the evaluation of crude and refined insect protein extracts in fish, chicken and pig feeding trials.The determination of the optimal design of insect-based animal feed production systems utilising the results of a comprehensive life cycle analysis.To build a pro-insect platform in Europe to encourage adoption of sustainable production technologies to include examination of the regulatory framework.

 

For full information about the PROteINSECT Project please visit our website www.proteinsect.eu or email us at info@proteinsect.eu."

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Circular economy: Getting the circulation going : Nature : Nature Publishing Group

Circular economy: Getting the circulation going : Nature : Nature Publishing Group | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
In linear economics, objects of desire from skyscrapers to paperclips are waste waiting to happen. Now, linearity is reaching the end of the line: designers are looking to the loop and redefining refuse as resource.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Unsold food — primarily fruit, vegetables, breads and grains from local grocers and food processors — arrives every day at Enterra's Vancouver facility. This feedstock is mixed in large tanks to produce a balanced diet for the large, protein-rich larvae of the black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens). At current capacity, the larvae at Enterra's facility can consume up to 100 tonnes of food a day. The adult fly, which has non-functional mouthparts, does not bite or even eat: it relies instead on energy stored during the larval stage to fly and reproduce.

The 6 million adult flies in the hatchery produce a constant supply of eggs. Once hatched, the larvae are fed daily for about three weeks. Each load of feed is consumed within a few hours — a fraction of the weeks or months needed to break down food in composting or waste-to-energy facilities.

Once the larvae are ready to be harvested, they are mechanically sifted to winnow out the 'frass', or manure. This is treated separately as a natural fertilizer certified for use in organic crop production. Approximately 1% of the harvested larvae are returned to the hatchery to produce more flies and eggs. The rest are processed into feed; dried, heat treated and packaged in bulk, they contain 40%protein and 40% fat, and can be shipped as is as a source of protein and oils, or turned into separate meal and oil. The larvae meal can be used in animal feed as a direct substitute for resource-intensive ingredients such as fish meal and soya-bean meal."

 

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Cheryl Preyer's curator insight, March 29, 11:26 AM

"Unsold food — primarily fruit, vegetables, breads and grains from local grocers and food processors — arrives every day at Enterra's Vancouver facility. This feedstock is mixed in large tanks to produce a balanced diet for the large, protein-rich larvae of the black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens). At current capacity, the larvae at Enterra's facility can consume up to 100 tonnes of food a day. The adult fly, which has non-functional mouthparts, does not bite or even eat: it relies instead on energy stored during the larval stage to fly and reproduce.

The 6 million adult flies in the hatchery produce a constant supply of eggs. Once hatched, the larvae are fed daily for about three weeks. Each load of feed is consumed within a few hours — a fraction of the weeks or months needed to break down food in composting or waste-to-energy facilities.

Once the larvae are ready to be harvested, they are mechanically sifted to winnow out the 'frass', or manure. This is treated separately as a natural fertilizer certified for use in organic crop production. Approximately 1% of the harvested larvae are returned to the hatchery to produce more flies and eggs. The rest are processed into feed; dried, heat treated and packaged in bulk, they contain 40%protein and 40% fat, and can be shipped as is as a source of protein and oils, or turned into separate meal and oil. The larvae meal can be used in animal feed as a direct substitute for resource-intensive ingredients such as fish meal and soya-bean meal."

 

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Entoview with AgriProtein | Edible Bug Farm

Entoview with AgriProtein | Edible Bug Farm | Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal | Scoop.it
Today, AgriProtein has a 9,000m2 factory, international licenses and has produced its first commercial volumes at Factory One. This took many years of investment, research, financing from various sponsors including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and above all, the dedication of the six executive team members.
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7 Up-And-Coming French Start-Ups

Ynsect
Each year we produce over a billion tons of organic waste, which includes leftover food and agricultural byproducts. Conversely, industries as diverse as animal nutrition, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics constantly need bioorganic starting materials. Ynsect bridges these two worlds using √s. Their strategy is simple: they farm insect colonies using food wastes and then harvest the insects for their bio-products which are then converted to useful nutrition. Given that Ynsect has attracted millions of euros in French government and private funding, using insects as natural bio-converting factories is good for both business and the environment.

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