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ACE Inhibitor Protects Heart and Lungs from Radiation Damage in Rats

Lung and breast cancers are often treated with radiation, but repeated high doses can also harm healthy tissues in the lungs and heart. New research suggests that both organs can be protected during radiation with a drug called captopril, an ACE inhibitor that is commonly used to treat cardiovascular disease. Radiation causes fibrosis (excess connective tissue) in the heart, diminishing blood flow to—and so damaging—the lungs. However, captopril decreases fibrosis in irradiated hearts and, therefore, also protects the lungs in rats, researchers reported at the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology's 2013 forum. The researchers are now designing a clinical trial to see if captopril also protects against radiation damage in people.

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Science Daily│Apr 21, 2013

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Radiation Therapists Lack Counseling to Address Erectile Dysfunction in Prostate Cancer

Radiation Therapists Lack Counseling to Address Erectile Dysfunction in Prostate Cancer | Prostate Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Further education is needed for radiation therapists on providing psychosexual counseling and clinical information to patients with prostate cancer experiencing erectile dysfunction, according to findings presented at the Congress of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology.


" 'We found that a large proportion of therapists either did not address erectile dysfunction during discussions with patients about their disease, or only mentioned it if the patient raised the issue first,' Carla O’Connell, a radiation therapist at Trinity College in Dublin, said in a press release. 'As far as we could ascertain, in many cases neither therapist nor patient felt comfortable enough to raise the topic. A lack of time and the perception that patients do not expect radiation therapists to ask about sexual matters were the biggest barriers to addressing the problems of erectile dysfunction that we found.' "

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Healio  |  Apr 24, 2014

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Cancer Patients Need Anxiety, Depression Screening

Cancer Patients Need Anxiety, Depression Screening | Prostate Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"It is important to recognize and treat anxiety or depression among cancer patients, according to a clinical guideline published online April 14 in theJournal of Clinical Oncology...


"The panel recommends that all patients with cancer be evaluated for symptoms of depression and anxiety periodically throughout care. Validated, published measures and procedures should be used for assessments. Different treatment pathways are recommended depending on symptom level. The risk for poor quality of life and potential disease-related morbidity and mortality is increased by the failure to identify and treat anxiety and depression."

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Medical Xpress  |  Apr 22, 2014

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Care of Cancer Survivors Often Falls Short

Care of Cancer Survivors Often Falls Short | Prostate Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Most cancer patients enter survivorship with little direction from oncologists or primary care providers, according to a national survey.


"Two-thirds of 1,130 oncologists said they always or almost always discuss survivorship with patients, but only a third told patients where to seek cancer-related or other care. Fewer than 5% of oncology respondents provided patients with a written plan for survivorship care."

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MedPage Today  |  Apr 21, 2014

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MedPage Today  |  Apr 21, 2014

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MedPage Today  |  Apr 21, 2014

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Robot Versus Surgeon: No Clear Winner

Robot Versus Surgeon: No Clear Winner | Prostate Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) led to complication rates, readmission rates, and rates of additional cancer therapy similar to those of conventional surgical prostatectomy, a review of almost 6,000 cases showed.


"Patients who underwent RARP had significantly higher complications rates at 30 and 90 days, but blood loss and transfusion rates were lower, as was the risk of a prolonged hospital stay. After adjustment, the overall complication rates did not differ."

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Medpage Today  |  Apr 18, 2014

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Radical Treatment for Advanced Prostate Cancer May Herald Major Survival Advantage Over Conventional Treatment

"Controversial new research may overturn the standard treatment of men with advanced prostate cancer. Work indicates that men with advanced prostate cancer could have a better chance of surviving if they undergo treatment directed specifically at the prostate (so-called 'radical' therapy) as well as hormonal treatment."

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ScienceDaily  |  Apr 14, 2014

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New Fusion Technology Increases Prostate Cancer Detection Accuracy to 97 Percent

"A powerful new tool for visualizing and monitoring the prostate in men who have high prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and in detecting prostate cancer more accurately is now available in some American hospitals. The new technology combines or “fuses” magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound images uses electromagnetic tracking/guidance, similar to your car’s GPS system. A tiny tracking sensor is attached to an ultrasound probe and generates a small, localized electromagnetic field that helps determine the location and orientation of the biopsy device."

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ScienceDaily  |  Apr 14, 2014

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Longest Prostate Cancer Active Surveillance Study Promising

"The longest follow-up to date of active surveillance in patients with favorable or intermediate-risk prostate cancer shows that it is a safe and feasible approach for as long as 20 years after diagnosis.


"Men in the study cohort had early-stage disease and were managed with surveillance; they were treated only if there were signs of disease progression. Up to 20 years after diagnosis, 1.5% of the 993 men had died, and 3.1% had developed metastatic disease.


"In addition, death was 10 times more likely from other causes than from prostate cancer, reported Laurie Klotz, MD, from the Sunnybrook Research Institute in Toronto."

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Medscape  |  Apr 14, 2014

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A Quarter of Men Drop Out of Prostate Cancer Monitoring, Casting Doubt on Safety of “Active Surveillance”

"A long-term follow up of prostate cancer patients shows that the option of monitoring slow-growing prostate cancer may not be as safe as thought, due to a quarter of men dropping out of the monitoring programme.


"Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, with a European incidence rate of 214  cases per 1000 men, outnumbering lung and colorectal cancer. Research shows that with advancing age, most men are likely to have a cancer of the prostate, although for many the cancer will be so slow growing that it does not create a real problem. Recently there has been significant visibility given to the risk of prostate-cancer 'overdiagnosis' – treatment  when it is not justified by a serious health threat."

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European Association of Urology  |  Apr 12, 2014

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Shared Decision Making Improves Patient Satisfaction During Radiation Therapy

Shared Decision Making Improves Patient Satisfaction During Radiation Therapy | Prostate Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Taking an active role in their radiation treatment decisions leaves cancer patients feeling more satisfied with their care, and may even relieve psychological distress around the experience, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania report in the journal Cancer.


"In a study of 305 patients undergoing radiation treatment, Neha Vapiwala, MD, an associate professor in the department in Radiation Oncology at Penn Medicine, and colleagues at Penn's Abramson Cancer Center found an association between patient satisfaction and patient-perceived control and shared decision making (SDM)—the process that allows patients and providers to make health care decisions together, taking into account scientific evidence as well as the patient's values and preferences."

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Medical Xpress  |  Apr 14, 2014

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Dendreon Says Prelim. Data from LT Phase II STAND Study Will Be Presented at EAU Congress, Will Show Immune Responses with PROVENGE Enhanced, Sustained

"Dendreon Corporation (NASDAQ: DNDN) today announced the presentation of preliminary data from a long-term analysis of the Phase II STAND study demonstrating that tumor-specific T-cell responses appear to be enhanced and sustained when PROVENGE^® (sipuleucel-T) is given after androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients with biochemically-recurrent prostate cancer (BRPC) at high risk for metastases. These data will be presented at the 29^th Annual European Association of Urology (EAU) Congress taking place from April 11-15, 2014 in Stockholm, Sweden."


Editor's note: This story is about a study that demonstrated positive patient responses when the cancer vaccine Provenge was given as a prostate cancer treatment after patients were first treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). The study focused on patients with biochemically-recurrent prostate cancer (BRPC) at high risk for metastasis.

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Morningstar  |  Apr 11, 14

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Sidestepping the Biopsy With New Tools to Spot Cancer

Sidestepping the Biopsy With New Tools to Spot Cancer | Prostate Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"For people with cancer or suspected cancer, the biopsy is a necessary evil — an uncomfortable and somewhat risky procedure to extract tissue for diagnosis or analysis.


"Lynn Lewis, a breast cancer patient in Brooklyn, has had her cancer analyzed an easier way: simple blood tests that are being called 'liquid biopsies.'


"Telltale traces of a tumor are often present in the blood. These traces — either intact cancer cells or fragments of tumor DNA — are present in minuscule amounts, but numerous companies are now coming to market with sophisticated tests that can detect and analyze them."

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The New York Times  |  Apr 7, 2014

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The New York Times  |  Apr 7, 2014

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The New York Times  |  Apr 7, 2014

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New Test Could Accurately Predict Prostate Cancer Recurrence

"Researchers have created a test that they say can predict whether a man is at high risk of prostate cancer recurrence.


"The research team, led by Prof. Robert Bristow of the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and the University of Toronto, both in Canada, presented their findings at the 33rd conference of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO33) in Vienna, Italy.


"For men with cancer confined to the prostate, surgery and precision radiotherapy are the primary treatments. However, Prof. Bristow explains that during initial treatment, whether the cancer has spread outside the prostate often goes undetected. This means the cancer will return in 30-50% of patients."

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Medical News Today  |  Apr 7, 2014

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Non-Invasive Imaging Instead of Repeated Biopsy in Active Monitoring of Prostate Cancer

Non-Invasive Imaging Instead of Repeated Biopsy in Active Monitoring of Prostate Cancer | Prostate Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Your body’s cells have two major interconnected energy sources: the lipid metabolism and the glucose metabolism. Most cancers feed themselves by metabolizing glucose, and thus can be seen in Positron Emission Topography (PET) scans that detect radiolabeled glucose. However, prostate cancers tend to use the lipid metabolism route and so cannot be imaged in this way effectively. A University of Colorado Cancer Center study being presented today at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014 describes a novel method to “manipulate the lipid metabolism in the cancer cell to trick them to use more radiolabeled glucose, the basis of PET scanning,” says Isabel Schlaepfer, PhD, investigator at the CU Cancer Center Department of Pharmacology, and recipient of a 2014 Minority Scholar Award in Cancer Research from AACR...


"The University of Colorado Cancer Center is currently recruiting participants for a human clinical trial of the fat-burning inhibitor ranolazine to enhance PET imaging during the active monitoring of prostate cancer (NCT01992016)."

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University of Colorado Cancer Center  |  Apr 6, 2014

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New Target for Prostate Cancer Resistant to Anti-Hormone Therapies

New Target for Prostate Cancer Resistant to Anti-Hormone Therapies | Prostate Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Prostate cancer becomes deadly when anti-hormone treatments stop working. Now a new study suggests a way to block the hormones at their entrance.


"Researchers from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have found that a protein called BET bromodomain protein 4 binds to the hormone androgen receptor downstream of where current therapies work – targeting androgen receptor signaling.


"This could mean that when prostate cancer becomes resistant to current treatments, it might remain sensitive to a drug that targets BET bromodomain proteins. Results appear inNature."


Editor's note: The drug described in this story, JQ1, will likely soon be offered to prostate cancer patients through clinical trials.

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Medical Xpress  |  Apr Apr 23, 2014

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An Apple a Day, and Other Myths

An Apple a Day, and Other Myths | Prostate Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A trip to almost any bookstore or a cruise around the Internet might leave the impression that avoiding cancer is mostly a matter of watching what you eat. One source after another promotes the protective powers of 'superfoods,' rich in antioxidants and other phytochemicals, or advises readers to emulate the diets of Chinese peasants or Paleolithic cave dwellers.


"But there is a yawning divide between this nutritional folklore and science. During the last two decades the connection between the foods we eat and the cellular anarchy called cancer has been unraveling string by string."

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The New York Times  |  Apr 21, 2014

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The New York Times  |  Apr 21, 2014

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The New York Times  |  Apr 21, 2014

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Chronic Inflammation Linked to 'High-Grade' Prostate Cancer

"Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice the risk of actually having prostate cancer than those with no inflammation, according to results of a new study. The link between persistent inflammation and cancer was even stronger for men with so-called high-grade prostate cancer -- those with a Gleason score between 7 and 10 -- indicating the presence of the most aggressive and rapidly growing prostate cancers."

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ScienceDaily  |  Apr 18, 2014

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Palliative Care Explained

"Originating from the Latin word pallium, meaning 'a cloak,' palliative care offers relief from the symptoms and stresses of cancer. It’s not a replacement for therapies like chemotherapy, radiation or surgery that treat the illness. Instead, it’s a companion therapy.


"For someone with a serious condition that affects quality of life, 'if you want the best care possible and you’re getting cancer care without palliative care, then you’re not getting the best care,' says Diane Meier, a geriatrician and palliative care specialist who directs the Center to Advance Palliative Care."


Editor's note: Palliative care is often mistakenly equated with hospice care or end-of-life care. In fact, any cancer patient can seek palliative care to complement their treatment and improve quality of life.

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Cancer Today  |  Spring 2014

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Cancer Today  |  Spring 2014

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Cholesterol Unlocks Clues to Prostate Cancer Spread

Cholesterol Unlocks Clues to Prostate Cancer Spread | Prostate Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The findings could help explain why taking statins – commonly used cholesterol-lowering drugs – is thought to slow the progress of the disease in some cases.


"The scientists, from The University of Manchester, made the discovery by combining prostate cancer cells in the lab with arachidonic acid (AA), an omega-6 fatty acid that has been shown to attract prostate cancer cells to the bone marrow, where it is found naturally in high concentrations."

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Medical Xpress  |  Apr 17, 2014

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NICE Nod for Firmagon's Prostate Cancer Drug

NICE Nod for Firmagon's Prostate Cancer Drug | Prostate Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A subgroup of patients with advanced prostate cancer could now get access to a new treatment option in England and Wales after cost regulators for the NHS issued a green light for Ferring's Firmagon (degarelix).

"In final draft guidance published this morning by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, the drug has been recommended as an option for treating advanced hormone-dependent prostate cancer but specifically in patients with spinal metastases who present with signs or symptoms of spinal cord compression."


Editor's note: Last year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved degarelix for use in the U.S.

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PharmaTimes  |  Apr 15, 2014

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Thematic Session 10: Update on treatment options for patients with CRPC

Thematic Session 10: Update on treatment options for patients with CRPC | Prostate Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"There are new treatment options for castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) but finding the optimal strategy and selecting the right patient is still fraught with challenges and difficulties, according to uro-oncology experts during a thematic session at the 29th Annual EAU Congress in Stockholm, Sweden.


“ 'With many prostate cancer patients hoping for a better life without symptoms of the disease, the aim is to identify which new drugs, or a combination of these drugs, can offer prolong survival or effectively palliate bone disease,' said Prof. Maria De Santis who chaired Thematic Session 10.


"The session focussed on castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) which is often considered one of the toughest challenges in uro-oncology since despite repeated treatments the disease accelerates or progresses with severe impact on quality of life (QoL)."


Editor's note: This article is about an event at a urology conference in Sweden. During the event, participants discussed the latest in prostate cancer treatment, with a focus on castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

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European Association of Urology  |  Apr 14, 2014

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ASCO Releases First Three Guidelines on Cancer Survivorship Care

"The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) today issued three evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the prevention and management of symptoms that affect many cancer survivors—neuropathy, fatigue and depression, and anxiety. The guidelines are the first three in a planned series of guidelines on survivorship care. The recommendations reinforce the need to care for the both physical and psychological needs of cancer survivors."


"The release of these guidelines come at a time when the number of people with a history of cancer in the United States has increased dramatically, from 3 million in 1971 to about 13.7 million today. Despite these important gains, cancer survivors still face a range of long-term challenges from their disease and its treatment.  Cancer survivors face an increased risk for other health problems, premature mortality and side-effects from treatment.  The transition from active treatment to post-treatment care is critical to optimal long-term health. If care is not planned and coordinated, cancer survivors are left without knowledge of their heightened risks and a follow-up plan of action.


"In addition to the guidelines, Cancer.Net, ASCO’s patient information website, has updated information for survivors that is based on ASCO’s latest recommendations."

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ASCO  |  Apr 14, 2014

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ASCO  |  Apr 14, 2014

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ASCO  |  Apr 14, 2014

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, April 17, 11:30 AM

Great.  More guidelines.  How much money is spent on research, writing, studies and more to get to the finding that there is a, "need to care for the both physical and psychological needs of cancer survivors."  At some point, information must be turned into action - and many recommendations in survivorship these days come with mandates but no resources to implement or processes by which to initiate.


Cancer survivorship needs more funding and more insurance coverage, not more recommendations  - most of which have already been well documented and published for over a decade.  

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Cancer ‘Miracle’ Patients Studied Anew for Disease Clues

Cancer ‘Miracle’ Patients Studied Anew for Disease Clues | Prostate Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The history of oncology is rife with reports of patients with advanced cancer who staged miraculous recoveries.


"Now scientists are starting to use sophisticated DNA sequencing technology to determine if these “exceptional responders” carry gene variations that can lead to new treatment approaches, better targeted therapies or even the re-emergence of experimental drugs once deemed failures.


"The mystery surrounding Jan Crisitello, a 70-year-old grandmother of four, is a case in point. Five years ago, 29 patients with advanced melanoma enrolled in a trial of a drug under development by Pfizer Inc. (PFE) Only one, Crisitello, came away with her cancer in remission. Now, she is being studied to see how her unique genome may have interacted with the drug to spur her recovery."


Editor's note: To learn more about personalized medicine, click here.

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Bloomberg  |  Apr 10, 2014

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Bloomberg  |  Apr 10, 2014

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Bloomberg  |  Apr 10, 2014

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Using a Person's Own Immune System to Fight Cancer: Phase I Clinical Trial of New Immunotherapy Beginning

Using a Person's Own Immune System to Fight Cancer: Phase I Clinical Trial of New Immunotherapy Beginning | Prostate Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Moffitt Cancer Center has initiated a phase I clinical trial for a new immunotherapy drug, ID-G305, made by Immune Design. Immunotherapy is a treatment option that uses a person’s own immune system to fight cancer. It has several advantages over standard cancer therapies, including fewer side effects and an overall better tolerability. It tends to be most effective in patients who have smaller, localized tumors that have not spread to distant sites."


Editor's note: This treatment looks for and targets cells that have the protein NY-ESO-1. Only 10-15% of tumors have NY-ESO-1, and patients' tumors must test positive for NY-ESO-1 in order for the patients to enroll in the trial. Learn more about immunotherapy and clinical trials here.

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ScienceDaily  |  Apr 10, 2014

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ScienceDaily  |  Apr 10, 2014

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ScienceDaily  |  Apr 10, 2014

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Blood-Based Biomarker May Identify Prostate Cancers That Will be Resistant to Enzalutamide

Blood-Based Biomarker May Identify Prostate Cancers That Will be Resistant to Enzalutamide | Prostate Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer who started treatment with the drug enzalutamide (Xtandi) and had a molecule called AR-V7 present in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) obtained prior to treatment had a worse response to enzalutamide compared with those who had no detectable AR-V7, according to results presented here at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014, April 5-9."


Editor's note: Biomarkers and molecular testing to find them can help guide treatment decisions for people with many different types of cancer. Learn more.

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Medical Xpress  |  Apr 8, 2014

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Brachytherapy Helps Maintain Erectile Function in Prostate Cancer Patients Without Compromising Treatment Outcomes

"The use of permanent brachytherapy, a procedure where radioactive sources are placed inside the prostate, into or near to the tumour, preserves erectile function in approximately 50% of patients with prostate cancer, a researcher will tell the ESTRO 33 congress today (Saturday).


"Brachytherapy works by giving a high dose of radiotherapy directly to the tumour, but only a very low dose to the surrounding normal tissues. Since erectile dysfunction (ED) can occur in up to 68% of patients who receive external beam radiotherapy for the condition, this is a significant improvement and the treatment should be offered to all patients, particularly those who are sexually active, the researchers say."

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ESTRO  |  Apr 5, 2014

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