Propaganda from World War I
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Propaganda from World War I
Propaganda from World War I
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The 16 Most Hilariously Ineffective Propaganda Posters

The 16 Most Hilariously Ineffective Propaganda Posters | Propaganda from World War I | Scoop.it
War is hell, and tragedy, and terrible, terrible posters.

 

NOTE:  This wouldn't be one you could just show at school as is.. some interesting commentary makes this entertaining but not all language is appropriate.  So now you'll be sure to read this one.  

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I Declare World Peace: Kellogg-Briand Pact

I Declare World Peace: Kellogg-Briand Pact | Propaganda from World War I | Scoop.it
I Declare World Peace: Kellogg-Briand Pact 1928 /1929 for the Renunciation of War, site for peace (RT @sayghal: V @idclrWorldPeace: Remember, ALL war is illegal.)...
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propaganda of world war 1

These are some recruitment and propeganda posters from the British and French during world war 1. Some are quite amusing while other are not. The song over i...
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World War 1 Propaganda Posters | Examples of Propaganda from WW1

World War 1 Propaganda Posters | Examples of Propaganda from WW1 | Propaganda from World War I | Scoop.it
Examples of posters used as World War 1 propaganda. Pictures of WW1 art used to sell liberty war bonds, fund the Red Cross, and support soldiers.
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British propaganda during World War I - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In World War I, British propaganda took various forms, including pictures, literature and film. Britain also placed significant emphasis on atrocity propaganda as a way of mobilizing hatred[citation needed] against Germany.

Britain had no propaganda agencies at the war's outbreak, but an organisation was soon established at Wellington House under Charles Masterman in response to propaganda activities in Britain. During most of the war, responsibility for propaganda was divided between various agencies, resulting in a lack of coordination. It was not until 1918 that activities were centralised under the Ministry of Information.

When the war finished, almost all of the propaganda machinery was dismantled. There were various interwar debates regarding British use of propaganda, particularly atrocity propaganda. Commentators such as Arthur Ponsonby exposed many of the alleged atrocities as either lies or exaggeration, leading to a suspicion surrounding atrocity stories which meant a reluctance to believe the realities of Nazi persecution in the Second World War.[1]

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Propaganda and World War One

Propaganda and World War One | Propaganda from World War I | Scoop.it
Propaganda was used in World War One as in any war - and the truth suffered. Propaganda ensured that the people only got to know what their governments wanted them to know.
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World War I film propaganda - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nations were new to cinema and its capability to spread and influence mass sentiment at the start of World War I. The early years of the war were experimental in regard to using films as a propaganda tool, but eventually became a central instrument for what George Mosse has called the "nationalization of the masses" as nations learned to manipulate emotions to mobilize the people for a national cause against the imagined or real enemy.[1]

British efforts in pro-war film production took some time to find their stride as it, unlike Germany, did not realize the potential of film as a means of projecting the nation’s official point of view. The British recognized early in the war that they needed to target neutral audiences, specifically America, to either get them to join the war or further support the war effort in Britain. One of the leading figures in bringing British war films to the U.S. was Charles Urban, the best known film producer in England at the time. He first brought Britain Prepared to the States in early 1916 and The Battle of the Somme in August 1916, both of whose rights were sold to the Patriot Film Corporation. Neither achieved the success the British sought, in part because of Urban’s and Wellington House’s refusal to address Urban’s German ancestry or that the films were produced by the British government with the intention of winning over American audiences. This stance changed in November 1916, when the British created the War Office Cinematograph Committee (WOCC), under which the film’s official intent was to be known. It was absorbed by the Department of Information (DOI) early in 1917.

The U.S. entered the war in April 1917, which achieved Wellington House's primary objective. The DOI increased its production of war films, but did not know what would play most effectively in the U.S., leading to nearly every British war film being sent to the States thereafter, including The Tanks in Action at the Battle of the Ancre and The Retreat of the Germans at the Battle of Arras, both of which were eventually released as serials. It also turned away from feature length films because they took longer to produce, leaving greater gaps between releases. The DOI found it better to constantly release films and shorts of varying lengths and topics, including newsreels, to increase the market saturation. Newsreels became increasingly popular and a part of the standard war propaganda policy with the DOI and its successor, the Ministry of Information.

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Propaganda Art - WWI

This is part of a new series, showing the art of propaganda. You will find artistic examples from the USA, Great Britain, Soviet Union, France, Italy, German...
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WW1 PROPAGANDA POSTERS(UK)

Each of the nations which participated in World War One from 1914-18 used propaganda posters not only as a means of justifying involvement to their own popul...
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First World War.com - Propaganda Posters

First World War.com - Propaganda Posters | Propaganda from World War I | Scoop.it
First World War.com - A multimedia history of world war one...
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