pronouncing words in English
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Pronunciation of S in English

Cómo pronunciar la S en inglés Pronunciation of S in English: http://t.co/09zC1jucvP vía @WoodwardEnglish
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Pronunciation of S in English

Cómo pronunciar la S en inglés Pronunciation of S in English: http://t.co/09zC1jucvP vía @WoodwardEnglish
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Journal - Elted - English Language Teacher Education and Development

Journal - Elted - English Language Teacher Education and Development | pronouncing words in English | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Why English spelling is so messed up - The Week Magazine

Why English spelling is so messed up - The Week Magazine | pronouncing words in English | Scoop.it
The Week Magazine
Why English spelling is so messed up
The Week Magazine
People did their own thing, trying their best to match up tradition with current pronunciation.
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Euphemisms are causing the English language to erode

Euphemisms are causing the English language to erode | pronouncing words in English | Scoop.it

A euphemism is defined as a non-harmful phrase or word used to substitute another word or phrase that is seen as, in some way, unpleasant. These words and phrases, though created with the best possible intentions, are slowly causing the English language to decay.For example, penitentiaries used to be led by a warden. In an effort to seem politically correct, penitentiaries, prisons and jails have been renamed to the, allegedly less controversial, title of “correctional facility” or “detention facility.” The wardens, as the leaders, are now referred to as the “correctional facility supervisor” or “detention facility supervisor.” With these new euphemisms, the words “penitentiary” and “warden,” which had no other use besides describing an actual prison or its leader, have been replaced. These old words are slowly disappearing from the English language, being replaced by softer phrases. The allegedly harsh words have been written out of the language, for fear of being offensive. It is one thing to replace an allegedly offensive or harsh word with another word meaning the same thing, but these euphemisms are simply removing the words from our lexicons and replacing them with presumably innocuous phrases. 


Via Charles Tiayon
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