Subtracting with Regrouping
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Math Video - Subtraction by Regrouping

Math Video - Subtraction by Regrouping | Subtracting with Regrouping | Scoop.it
Math video explains subtraction by regrouping.
Laura Jane's insight:

Great video resource to use in small group math centers. This video reinforces the logic behind regrouping. It shows the number in multiple ways, and also includes manipulatives. The teacher who created the video clearly thought this out, showing the problem in standard form, expanded form, and with manipulatives. 

 

Although it would be easy to recreate this video on a smart board, I like the concept of using the video. I think that students get bored by the monotony of math class. My students get so excited whenever we simply mention a "video," and they appear to be much more engaged.

 

Overall, I really like the variety of this video, and the way the woman scaffolds the concept. I would like to use this in my classroom.

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Grade 2: Two-Digit Subtraction With Regrouping: When Students Ask


Via Samantha Hines
Laura Jane's insight:

As Sam already mentioned, this Houghton Mifflin resource is brilliant. It predicts questions that students will have about regrouping, and provides teacher resources for how to combat these questions. As I've stated previously, I often find it hard to "un-learn" concepts, yet this is critical in helping students to better understand a topic. Being able to teach them on their level is critical.

 

I would use this resource alongside Dr. Bote's "questioning strategies" resource in order to get the most out of my teaching. Thinking about the questions that we ask is paramount in generating effective lessons.

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Samantha Hines's curator insight, December 15, 2013 12:57 PM

This is a really unique resource from Houghton Mifflin that gives teachers strategies on how to answer common questions from students when it comes to two-digit subtraction with regrouping. These questions are ones that teachers should be prepared for; as regrouping when subtracting can be a really difficult concept to grasp (it was for me!) These questions are: “Will I always regroup when I subtract?” “How can I subtract two-digit numbers correctly?” “Is regrouping for subtraction different from regrouping for addition” “Why do I need to know this?” and “Why should I know how to estimate a difference?” Good teachers always prepare for common misconceptions that might come up in a lesson, and this gives teachers strategies on how to answer these common questions effectively. The most intriguing question that I found and one that relates to our learning this semester is “Why do I need to know this?” By providing meaningful activities and showing (not just telling) students that they will be using subtraction all throughout their lives, students will see the importance of learning this skill and will be able to apply it to other contexts as well, which will only deepen their understanding. 

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Who are the people in your neighborhood? . . .

Who are the people in your neighborhood? . . . | Subtracting with Regrouping | Scoop.it
We had to change things up a bit, since I learned yesterday that P had forgotten subtraction with regrouping. He had a hard time with the curriculum at school, because it had boxes everywhere regro...
Laura Jane's insight:

This method REALLY worked for my students! My third graders were having a really hard time mastering regrouping. They would carry the one, but forget to cross out the number that they borrowed from, etc. I realized that they weren't just forgetting to do these things, but they didn't actually understand the algorithm behind it. They knew they had to cross it out and carry a one, but they didn't know why.

 

Breaking subtraction probelms into "houses" helps to make sense of the math for students. I modified this a little bit by having them write the number out in expanded form (342= 300+40+2) and placing each number into the appropriate house (drawn on white boards.) From there, I reitterated that each house could only give in groups of what it was (tens house can only give tens, hundreds only hundreds, etc.) Once they realized that they weren't just crossing out 4 and making it 3, but that they were taking 10 away from 40 to make it 30, they were able to see how the 2 became a 12.

 

I highly recomend this method to any teacher whose students keep making "silly" mistakes in their regrouping. Simplify!!

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BrainPOP Jr. | Math | Learn about Subtracting With Regrouping

Provides educational movies for K-3 students. Homework Help, leveled quizzes, games and activities for kids. Exceptional resource for teachers and homeschools.

Via Samantha Hines
Laura Jane's insight:

I have heard a lot of praise for BrainPOP, but it isn't a resource that my mentor teacher utilizes. This video shows subtraction in a real world context: losing points in a board game, selling tickets, a store selling toys, etc. By making these connections to things that students of this generation have actually encountered, it makes the math more meaningful and significant.

 

Teachers frequently teach the algorithm for a math skill, without explaining WHY it makes sense. This video also uses virtual manipulatives to model regrouping for students. This aspect makes the video very versatile... It could be shown to the whole group, or it could be used for independent computer work in small math rotation groups. 

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Samantha Hines's curator insight, December 15, 2013 1:18 PM

My mentor and I have used BrainPop videos many times in our classroom before, and the students love it. They are really familiar with the characters in the videos and how the website works, which would encourage them to view this video as valuable as well. This video about subtraction with regrouping puts the concept into real world problems: playing a board game and losing points, selling tickets, a store selling robot toys, etc. Because the video introduces the concept in many different contexts, great discussion could be facilitated because students are presented with various ways to access the information. This video explains how to trade ones cubes for a tens block and vice versa, and also shows the blocks moving around to help students visualize this concept of trading. This is beneficial because students can then model this and go and practice with tens blocks on their own, or teachers can refer back to this video when modeling how to use tens blocks. The video also explains why you have to regroup, which I think is a missing part of many lessons on subtraction with regrouping. The narration walks students through each step of the process (several times in different contexts) by drawing on the equation and talking through every part. Therefore, it could be used for independent computer time before releasing them to another online task. If a teacher was using this with the whole class, they could pause the video at certain times to discuss and focus on where students are really having trouble. Lastly, the part of the video that I think makes it stand apart from other online resources is the section at the end where it talks about using addition to check your answer. This is a great extension and allows students to conceptualize subtraction in a different way. They can see how addition and subtraction relate while also learning a strategy to double-check their work. 

Alexis's curator insight, December 15, 2013 11:43 PM

I have heard great things about Brain Pop. I think that my students would really enjoy this and it gives them a break from regular math lessons. They can play games, take quizzes, and more while exercising thier brains and practicing math (specifically subtraction with regrouping).

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What Teachers Need to Know about Using Twitter in Elementary Classroom - 5 minute "slam"!

What Teachers Need to Know about Using Twitter in Elementary Classroom  - 5 minute "slam"! | Subtracting with Regrouping | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Laura Jane's insight:

Incorporating Twitter into our classrooms... Interesting read!

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Subtraction with Regrouping Dance

Mrs. Rhinehart's Class uses this rhyme/dance to help us subtract with regrouping two digit numbers, but it can be used for 2 or more digits!

Via Jenee' Greenwood
Laura Jane's insight:

I love this resource that Jenee curated! My students love to sing and dance any opportunity they get, and this is a great way to embrace that. I know that, personally, I can remember lyrics to songs that I haven't heard in 10 years if I just hear a snippit of the music. Music is a great pnemonic device in teaching, as it engages a different part of the brain. This allows students to make connections in a different way that usual. I think that my learners would love to participate in this, and that it would be an additional resource for them to have on hand when solving regrouping probelms independently. 

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Jenee' Greenwood's curator insight, December 14, 2013 11:12 AM

A fun way to teach students the rules for subtracting with regrouping. I have noticed that my students love learning new catchy songs. My mentor teacher and I have both used songs in our lesssons, this song also incorporates a dance which would be more interactive. The students would love to get out of their seats and dance while learning. I really enojyed this video!

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A Math Regrouping App

2-digit addition and subtraction. Turn regrouping on or off.  Grade 1+


Via Nicole Chatz
Laura Jane's insight:

My school just got a class set of iPads, and I've been working with my mentor teacher to convince her that we can use them as educational tools. Reading the description and reviews of this app, I definitely think this would have benefitted my class in our regrouping unit. This app page is a great springboard into finding more apps to use for math teaching. Children are so into technology these days, and finding authentic ways to incorporate it with their learning could be the difference between frustration and mastery for a student.

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Ginger Snaps: A little bit of this, a little bit of that...

Ginger Snaps: A little bit of this, a little bit of that... | Subtracting with Regrouping | Scoop.it

Spinner game for subtracting with regrouping

 

Laura Jane's insight:

I found this spinner game on Pinterest and used it in a small group during our subtracting with regrouping unit. After teaching students different strategies for subtracting with regrouping, I had them pull all of their knowledge in the form of a "game." Basically, they turn the paper into two spinners using a pencil and a paper clip. Once they have their top number and their bottom number, they subtract them (using one of their regrouping methods) in order to get the answer.

 

I found this game to be really effective with my students because it got them so engaged. This was a much more interactive form of assessment, as the students were all getting different combinations of problems to compute. Because it wasn't just a ditto handed out to them, they saw the activity as more interactive and engaging. I would definitely recomend this game to any teacher who has the opportunity to teach math in small groups, and is looking for a more fun way of assessing student progress.

 

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Math night introduces parents to new curriculum - Rapid City Journal

Math night introduces parents to new curriculum - Rapid City Journal | Subtracting with Regrouping | Scoop.it
Math night introduces parents to new curriculum Rapid City Journal The purpose of the event was to familiarize the parents with this new math so when their children bring work and math games home they are a little bit more comfortable with it and...
Laura Jane's insight:

Taking the curriculum a step forward and getting the parents to engage with it, as well as the students.

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