Promoting a mathematical community of learners
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Improving Participation with Talk Moves

Improving Participation with Talk Moves | Promoting a mathematical community of learners | Scoop.it
Learn one way teachers are improving student participation in the classroom. Talk Moves is a method that encourages participation and collaboration by students.
Alysia's insight:

This teacher mentions in the beginning of the video that in her experience, students would check out as soon as another student was called on. By having students repeat back what their classmate as said, it gives them reason to be attentive while others are sharing. I have also observed that if my students do not get called on the answer the question, they tend to tune out, which is why I think having students repeat back keep them involved. I also really like the use of her "silent signal" that she has students do when they feel they are thinking the same way as other students. I think my class would love that! 

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Alexis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:18 PM

I think that is great. I know that a lot of students have trouble paying attention to what their classmates are saying. My students often need repeated directions because they aren't paying attention. I can definitely relate to the teacher saying that her students would "check out" if another student was called on. I think that repeating and add ons are great talk moves and I try to use them in my classroom. I like the use of the silent signal and making up their own talk move. I would love to do this in my own classroom! These talk moves would really help promote our mathematical community. The Teaching Channel is a great resource.

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AT-Sourcebook.pdf

Alysia's insight:

This sourcebook provides a lot of information about what accountable talk is and how to use it in the classroom. It offers insight into how to create a community that uses accountable talk, including teacher moves and how to establish routines. In my experience in the classroom I have seen how important it is for a teacher to set the standard and create rountines in order for students to be able to use accountable talk successfully, which is why I think this is a great resource. 

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Teachers should have the courage to be less helpful

Teachers should have the courage to be less helpful | Promoting a mathematical community of learners | Scoop.it
Patterns are everywhere in this world, the brain is a natural pattern-recognition machine, once the brain has a goal in mind, it tunes the perceptual system to search the environment. Even young to...
Alysia's insight:

Although this article does not focus soley on mathematics, I think it's undeniably linked to promoting a mathematical community of learners. This article talks about the classroom environment that takes the "mess" out of the learning and just leave students with work that is "information filling". In my experience with my own students (esp. with open ended math problem solving) I have seen how vastly different the classroom community becomes when students are working/struggling/and coming up with solutions using their own innate problem solving skills. Rather than just giving students worksheets and teaching algorithms, as new teachers we should have the courage to let students arrive at solutions by following their own path. 

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Storify - Create stories using social media

Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Lee Duckworth took a job teaching math to seventh graders in a New York public school. Sh...
Alysia's insight:

Great video posted by one of my classmates. We have to learn how to motivate children for the long run. The idea of a "growth mindset" and that we encourage children that they can learn from their failures. There definitely needs to be a shift in math education in order to promote positive dispositions toward math

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Math Talk: Stem and Move Cards

Math Talk: Stem and Move Cards | Promoting a mathematical community of learners | Scoop.it
In this packet you will find 75 cards with questions and sentence starters to help with math conversations. These cards are designed to be used with Math Talk.
Alysia's insight:

Using math talk cards in the classroom seems like a good strategy for helping students develop accountable talk skills. These are only three dollars on TPT. In my first grade class my mentor teacher has begun introducing the idea of accountable talk, and I have observed that the students respond really well to it. I think this could be helpful for teachers who feel unsure about how to use accountable talk in their classrooms. 

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Cierra Johnson's curator insight, December 16, 2013 2:53 PM

This is a wonderful resource from Teachers Pay Teachers and gives many different ways of "talk moves" to use in math. They consist of sentence starters, questions to elicit higher level thinking etc. I am so glad I found this resource and I will be using this in my classroom!

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Addition Story Mat Math Workstation

Addition Story Mat Math Workstation | Promoting a mathematical community of learners | Scoop.it
Students can practice telling addition stories with a partner or in groups. You may want them to use base ten blocks, connecting cubes or to draw/write
Alysia's insight:

I think this could be a fun addition resource to use when using open ended problem solving in the classroom. I think I would probably wait to introduce it until after I had set up the norm for open ended problem solving. I think it would be fun to let students work in pairs and use the mat to come up with their own open ended problem, and maybe even let the class solve the problems that are written by their peers. 

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The Myth of 'I'm Bad at Math'

The Myth of 'I'm Bad at Math' | Promoting a mathematical community of learners | Scoop.it
Basic ability in the subject isn't the product of good genes, but hard work.
Alysia's insight:

"The results? Convincing students that they could make themselves smarter by hard work led them to work harder and get higher grades. The intervention had the biggest effect for students who started out believing intelligence was genetic." This article stood out to me because I have always been a person that felt like I was just NOT good at math. I think it is increasingly important to help students in the classroom feel and understand that they CAN be good at math and it is not predetermined whether they will be or not. 

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