Promoting a Mathematical Community of Learners
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Scooped by Corinne Tomaszewski
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Kids Share Their Thoughts on Student Engagement

Kids Share Their Thoughts on Student Engagement | Promoting a Mathematical Community of Learners | Scoop.it
A twelve-year teaching veteran and a California regional Teacher of the Year, Heather Wolpert-Gawron's musings on educational policy, curriculum design, and daily school life can also be read at www
Corinne Tomaszewski's insight:

I love this! Teachers spend so much time trying to engage their students and making assumptions of what engagement actually means based off of some preconcieved ideas developed from where? I love that this comes straight from the students' perspectives. This article is abased on a sample of 220 students and their responses have been narrowed down to 10 common categories. I think that considering these 10 categories in your own classroom can be very beneficial for both the teacher and the students; however, I woulld suggest (and I would myself) conducting a survey in my own classroom. I could easily apply their responses to my students, but again that is not 100% representaive of my class  and their interests. Making math accessible and meaningful starts with addressing the your students needs and interests. Making them comfortable in the classroom will make learning math more enjoyable.  Including student choice in your decision making and colaborating with students makes them feel important and valued in the process of structuring their education. 

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Whole Brain Teaching: Grade 1 Classroom

Whole Brain Teaching in first grade classroom.
Corinne Tomaszewski's insight:

I think that this video shows a good introduction or activity on addition strategies, specifically using number lines. I also like the whole brain teaching approach. There are a lot of videos available on Youtube that demonstrate how students become engaged and cooperate as a class through these teaching strategies. I think that having the students 'mirror' and 'teach' their peers is an efective way of getting the studnets involved and helping their retention of the information. It is very much like "I do, we do, you do". I'm not sure that I would adopt all of the whole brain teaching pedagogical strategies, however, I definitely see myself using some of these methods for keeping my students engaged and participating. That is the first step to helping them learn. 

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Corinne Tomaszewski's curator insight, December 14, 2013 9:33 PM

I think that this video shows a good introduction or activity on addition strategies, specifically using number lines. I also like the whole brain teaching approach. There are a lot of videos available on Youtube that demonstrate how students become engaged and cooperate as a class through these teaching strategies. I think that having the students 'mirror' and 'teach' their peers is an efective way of getting the studnets involved and helping their retention of the information. It is very much like "I do, we do, you do". I'm not sure that I would adopt all of the whole brain teaching pedagogical strategies, however, I definitely see myself using some of these methods for keeping my students engaged and participating. That is the first step to helping them learn. 

Rescooped by Corinne Tomaszewski from Creating a Mathematical Community
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Math Projects K-2

Math Projects K-2 | Promoting a Mathematical Community of Learners | Scoop.it
2nd Gr. Math Project: Be a Number Detective - locating odd and even numbers in the local community

Via Jennifer Callaway
Corinne Tomaszewski's insight:

I really liked the idea my classmate, Jennifer, had using this resource. I've seen activities for first grade before, making them into detectives, but this is the first related to math. I really like the idea of investigating the math we see both inside the classroom and out. When I collected the math disposition inventories of my first garders at the beginning of the year I realized none of them had any odea how math was relevant outside of the classroom unless it was homework. The mathematical eyes I do in class can only go so far. I would love to use these activities and reources to create fun ways for my students to explore mathematics outside of the classroom. 

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Jennifer Callaway's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:10 PM

This math detective project gave me an idea. I'd love to make the detective aspect more community orientated. I would encourage kids to find ways that they're parents, friends, and family uses math. I'd ask them to investigate what the people in their community use math for. This would not only strengthen their knowledge about math in their environment, but it would also allow them to communicate about math and its usefulness outside of a classroom context. 

Rescooped by Corinne Tomaszewski from Make Mathematics Accessible and Meaningful
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Real World Math Problems

Real World Math Problems | Promoting a Mathematical Community of Learners | Scoop.it
Mathalicious lessons teach standards-based math through real-world topics that students care about.

Via Madeline Morgan, Kay Clarke
Corinne Tomaszewski's insight:

I saw this scooped on another intern's site and I think that it has great potential. Just by exmporing for a few minutes I could see that it provides teacher with alternatives to traditional math lessons and really strives to make math meaningful and applicable for students. Unfortunately it does come with a price, so in terms of accessiblity...it isn't for teachers. Also, when I was looking at some of the lessons it seemed to be geared more towards the upper elementayr grades. If I were to use this as a resource and pay the monthly fee I would hope they have adaptations for different grade levels. I think the idea behind it is  great!! Making math concrete and in a real world context is crucial for helping students understand and later transfer that knowledge. 

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Kay Clarke's curator insight, December 12, 2013 7:24 PM

This website is AMAZING!  I had never heard of this source before, but Maddy actually scooped this.  The intro video speaks for itself. This website is trying to work with teachers to give them alternatives to traditional math lessons.  It provides lessons that are Standards based, making it easy to pick and chose lessons that can fit into the curriculum.  This website makes it easy for teachers to create lessons that are actually interesting to students.  Students aren't just learning math, they are learning skills to solve problems about things they care about.  The topics on the site include things like Nike, the NBA, outer space, things that students wouldn't think normally go together with math.  Being able to hook kids onto a math lesson, really get them engaged is a difficult task for a teacher.  However, this website, from the looks of it, has some great potential to serve as an aid to teachers.  I know as a future teacher, I will be looking everywhere to find contexts that would be relevant to my kids.  Sample lessons that are already tied to CCSS would be even better.  

Rachel Dwyer's curator insight, December 15, 2013 6:38 PM

This website makes math accessible and meaningful for students. On the website, they provide you with lessons and activities that have some sort of creative title and theme, such as Stairway to Heaven or Need for Speed. Then they provide the students with problem-solving activities that allow them to focus on and explore content that is within the curriculum in a fun and engaging way.

They use real world examples and themes in what they create, and encourage students in their learning and math experiences to make these connections and to find math in the world around them.

These problems remind me of the types of problems that we created in our Open-Ended Problem Solving (except they are not open-ended).

In terms of my own teaching, I intend to incorporate these types of problems into math instruction. I could use the problems that they provide, but also come up with my own, and then even have the students come up with their own. This allows students to do math relating to something that they know about and has purpose for them, and their familiarity and knowledge of it allows it to be accessible. They can reach it and understand it.

The students, through these problems, can think about math in terms of their world, and see the meaning behind the math and how our world can help us to understand it. The problems represent a wide variety of topics and ideas which are interesting and allow all students to find something that they are interested in. I have definitely got lots of ideas and examples which are starting to come to mind of what I could do to make these connections. I was wondering about how I might take what we have experienced in Dr. Bote's class and to then create some similar to these, so I am excited to have discovered this source. I found this on my own, but then saw that Madeline and Kayla had it on theirs as well. I think that the students' learning will now be more reinforced and relevant to their lives and experiences. They will no longer ask me: "Will we ever even use this in the real world and when we get older?" They can practice and learn to be explorers and discoverers who question, critique, and examine the world around them to make connections in math.

Kimberly Wynkoop's curator insight, January 26, 2014 9:25 PM

This website has many premade lessons that can be used as is or as a jump off point for your own students.  The lessons are all real world problems. Many of your students will be able to relate to the lessons content.

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Twitter / Miss_Whitt17: Talking moves! ...

Corinne Tomaszewski's insight:

https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/student-participation-strategy

 

This is great. We are currently working on increasing student participation through questioning and higher order thinking. I am going to share this video with my mentor so we can adapt it to our classroom. 

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