The promised land of technology
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The promised land of technology
Todays interesting ideas and inventions which I hope will form the future of mankind's technology.
Curated by Miro Svetlik
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Scientists See Advances in Deep Learning, a Part of Artificial Intelligence

Scientists See Advances in Deep Learning, a Part of Artificial Intelligence | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

Using an artificial intelligence technique inspired by theories about how the brain recognizes patterns, technology companies are reporting startling gains in fields as diverse as computer vision, speech recognition and the identification of promising new molecules for designing drugs.

 

The advances have led to widespread enthusiasm among researchers who design software to perform human activities like seeing, listening and thinking. They offer the promise of machines that converse with humans and perform tasks like driving cars and working in factories, raising the specter of automated robots that could replace human workers.

 

The technology, called deep learning, has already been put to use in services like Apple’s Siri virtual personal assistant, which is based on Nuance Communications’ speech recognition service, and in Google’s Street View, which uses machine vision to identify specific addresses.


Via Ashish Umre, Nicholas Smith
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Deep learning is one of the subjects I need to dig deeper in.

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Nicholas Smith's curator insight, March 22, 2013 6:45 AM

This article talks about advances made in deep learning, a part of artificial intelligence. This is quite an interesting article as deep learning is the technology which Apple's Siri uses and Google's Street View uses.

 

The interesting concept of deep learning is 'recognition', for example Apple's Siri voice recognition. It is absolutely extraordinary to think that an AI is able to recognize somebody when they speak and react to that person's command or question. Even with such amazing breakthroughs like Siri, in ten to fifteen years, we are most likely going to see more voice recognition programs in GPS's, phones and many more devices.

 

Deep learning is an extremely interesting and complex system. This source provides a decent insight into deep learning and artificial intelligent and was extremely helpful with my research topic.

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War of the Worlds: Who Owns the Political Soul of Science Fiction?

War of the Worlds: Who Owns the Political Soul of Science Fiction? | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

I make no apologies for writing science fiction. I love the genre with a deep and geeky love. Becoming professor of 19th-century literature at the University of London has done nothing to diminish my capacity for that mode of enthusiasm that fans call "squee".

 

Being a literature professor means, in effect, the government pays me to read books; and, taking my job seriously, I read a lot, in and out of genre. I think the novel is most alive today as a literature of the fantastic: at their worst, SF, fantasy and magic realist novels can be very bad; while at their best, they're by far the most exciting kinds of writing being published.

But here's the thing: my genre divides politically in a manner unlike others. Writers of historical or crime fiction might be rightwing or leftwing, but few would attempt to define those genres as intrinsically left- or right-leaning. SF is different: the genre defines itself according to two diametrically opposed ideological stances.

 

Let's take the lefty stance first, since it happens to be my own. Any SF text must include something that isn't in the "real" world: starship, robot, a new way of organising society, whatever. This might be material, social or even metaphysical, but it will encode difference. Alterity is fundamental to SF: it is a poetics of otherness and diversity. Now, it so happens that the encounter with "otherness"– racially, ethnically, in terms of gender, sexual orientation, disability and trans identity – has been the main driver of social debate for the last half‑century or more. The tidal shift towards global diversity is the big event of our times, and this is what makes SF the most relevant literature today. To say that SF has more imaginative and discursive wiggle-room than "realist" art is, while true, also to say that SF has the potential to be a more heterogeneous and inclusive conceptual space. This is something that's understood by the genre's greatest writers: Ursula K Le Guin, Octavia Butler, James Tiptree Jr, Margaret Atwood, Karen Joy Fowler, Pat Cadigan, Justina Robson.

 

On the other hand, many fans define SF as the literature of scientific extrapolation. There are those who think of "science" as ideologically neutral, simply the most authoritative picture of the universe available to humanity. The problem is that "authoritative" has a nasty habit of eliding with "authoritarian" when transferred into human social relations. Rightwing political affiliation comes in many forms, but for many rightwingers, respect for authority is a central aspect of their worldview. The world, says the rightwinger, is hard, unforgiving and punishes weakness: in order to prosper, we need to be self-reliant, subordinate decadent appetites to self-discipline, know what the rules are and follow them. There's lots of SF like this.

 

OK, I'll admit I've imported a caricature "rightwinger" into my argument. Nonetheless, SF contains many who believe the laws of physics make their ideology true. US SF grandmaster Robert Heinlein's credo, "There ain't no such thing as a free lunch", oft-repeated in his writing, folds a neutral fact of physics – entropy – into value-inflected judgments about things such as welfare and affirmative action. Orson Scott Card is a giant of the genre, but also a man who has declared that consensual gay sex should be illegal, and that any government that legalised gay marriage ought to be overthrown. Newt Gingrich, one‑time Republican presidential hopeful, has published SF novels; and books by writers such as Jerry Pournelle, John Ringo and Neal Asher sell extremely well.

 

It's a puzzle – not why these writers sell, for there are plenty of perfectly decent, book-loving rightwing people in the world (I take it as axiomatic that liking SF is an index of decency). I mean it's a puzzle for the genre. How can SF be both centrally about the articulation and exploration of marginalised and subaltern voices, and a projection of contemporary ideological concerns outward on to a cosmos in which the laws of physics themselves tell us to vote Conservative?

 

I'm not pretending objectivity. A full ideological reading of SF would interrogate the "hospitality to otherness" model with the same rigour as "the laws of physics validate my political beliefs" model. Heinlein's imagined interstellar future is an environment designed to valorise the skill sets (self-reliance, engineering competence, willpower, bravery and manliness) that Heinlein prized. Left-leaning Iain M Banks's Culture novels posit a high-tech geek utopia in which the particular skill sets, ethics and wit‑discourse of SF nerds turn out to be the gold standard of pan-galactic multi-species civilisation. I like the Culture a great deal, but I have to admit it's a "there is such a thing as a free lunch" sort of place.

 

Asking whether SF is "intrinsically" leftwing or rightwing is dumb, since literatures are not "intrinsically" anything. But I'm tempted to thump the tub nonetheless. Conservatism is defined by its respect for the past. The left has always been more interested in the future – specifically, in a better future. Myriad militaristic SF books and films suggest the most interesting thing to do with the alien is style it as an invading monster and empty thousands of rounds of ammunition into it. But the best SF understands that there are more interesting things to do with the alien than that. How we treat the other is the great ethical question of our age, and SF, at its best, is the best way to explore that question.

 

Adam Roberts's Jack Glass (Gollancz) has won the British Science FictionAssociation best novel prize.


Via James Keith
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Very nice thought about sci-fi genre...

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Marcel Aubron-Bülles's curator insight, April 16, 2013 5:19 AM

An interesting take on the subject.

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Basic Income, a new human right

Sign the petition here: http://basicincome2013.eu Follow us on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ECI.BasicIncome Basic Income should be universal, individua...


Via LeapMind
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Isn't it a great idea to eliminate poverty, well I am behind it in a sense that everybody should have a basic income to live a life in dignified way. On the other hand is the population mature enough to deal with getting basic income without exerting an effort? This can work both sides, it can make life of people easier and more stable but as well it might limit the motivation to achieve something or be socially active. All in all due to the nature of life and evolution, I am still bit sceptic about the real world implementation of this idea.  

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You don't 'own' your own genes: Researchers raise alarm about loss of individual 'genomic liberty' due to gene patents

You don't 'own' your own genes: Researchers raise alarm about loss of individual 'genomic liberty' due to gene patents | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

Humans don't "own" their own genes, the cellular chemicals that define who they are and what diseases they might be at risk for.


Via LeapMind
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Nice so from now on I will have to start paying for who I am. Hmm will they pay me for enriching 'their property' with my own experiences and life style?

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Jordan Rudess & Kevin Chartier of Wizdom Music in Sonic Talk 291 » iOS Musician

Jordan Rudess & Kevin Chartier of Wizdom Music in Sonic Talk 291 » iOS Musician | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
iPhone iPad iOS music apps for musicians
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I somehow missed this one :) though very nice elaboration from a keyboard player I keep in the high esteem and a programmer working with him. Specially on 38:48 as an coder who tasted asm I cannot agree more :), stop using crutches if it must be done it must be done. Get over with it.

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When People Worry About Math, the Brain Feels the Pain

When People Worry About Math, the Brain Feels the Pain | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Mathematics anxiety can prompt a response in the brain similar to when a person experiences physical pain, according to new research at the University of Chicago.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I must admit I remember this all too wel :). The pain experienced in front of whole class staring at the board while pondering some math problem. Ah so what thats why I became a coder.

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Fully Implantable Wireless Brain-Machine Interface Announced

Fully Implantable Wireless Brain-Machine Interface Announced | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Neural implants that read the electrical activity of the brain are no longer the work of fiction, improving over the years in their ability to gather ever larger amount of signals and being able to more effectively process them.

Via Emmanuel Capitaine
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Definitely inline with my intention to delve deeper into this emerging technology. I believe brain implants will be indispensable by 2050.

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Future of relationships: monogamy vs. promiscuity; the winner is…

Future of relationships: monogamy vs. promiscuity; the winner is… | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

There’s a pervasive notion that monogamous relationships are the end-all-be-all – the default pact in human couplings that keep the fabric of society from being torn apart.


Via LeapMind
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Very nice insight into a taboo theme of current perception of marriage. I believe society will form how we change our view of marriage which are often tainted not only by social necessity but also religion.

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Microsoft and Samsung demo Illumiroom display, fills room with images (video)

Microsoft and Samsung demo Illumiroom display, fills room with images (video) | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Microsoft just demonstrated an interesting display technology called Illumiroom at the Samsung CES keynote that apparently fills up the room with images
Miro Svetlik's insight:

This is funny use of projector when gaming to create more immersive Virtual Reality like experience. Though I am not a fan of Xbox or consoles in general as a gamer I can see myself trying it ;-)

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50 Fresh and Truly Creative Photo Manipulations

50 Fresh and Truly Creative Photo Manipulations | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Ok, I'll admit it. I've been slacking a bit too much, not being very consistent with the updates here at PixelTango. Hopefully, that will change now.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Miro Svetlik's insight:

well not everything here is totally fresh but some of these techniques are certainly nice to experiment with :)

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Experimental Microsoft software tries to predict catastrophic events by analyzing news headlines

Experimental Microsoft software tries to predict catastrophic events by analyzing news headlines | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
At first glance, it may sound like the plot of Person of Interest, the CBS show about a genius billionaire who develops a software program that taps into all public surveillance systems and predicts when crimes are most likely to occur.

Via Emmanuel Capitaine
Miro Svetlik's insight:

big brother is always watching you ;-) no really I think there is already more of these out there. Its a logical thing for goverments to let implement such a software if they want to survive.

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Björk's "App Album" Shows The Way For Musicians

Björk's "App Album" Shows The Way For Musicians | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Icelandic musician Björk recently released what she claims to be the world's "first app album." It's an iPad and iPhone app featuring 10 songs, each song accompanied by an interactive app.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

This is not a news really. Nevertheless I must say, this appification of audio visual art is not new at all. I have been personally part of demo scene 20 years ago and have feeling that our demos were just that. Pieces of art compiled in an app. (demo is an audio visual sequence compiled as an application to run on computers) Only the means of distribution have changed. 

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Embedding ThingLink Images in Sophia

Embedding ThingLink Images in Sophia | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
RT @cfruin: @ThingLink_EDU: Share ThingLink Images @sophia http://t.co/n8xgyUv2
#edtech #edchat #tlideas #tlchat #elearning

Via Jon Samuelson
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Cool concept and look very well done. I suppose this is the way how current learning should be extended.

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New DNA-Based Transistor Brings Us One Step Closer to True Human Computers | News we like

New DNA-Based Transistor Brings Us One Step Closer to True Human Computers | News we like | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
The increasingly ambiguous divide between man and machine just got blurred that much more with Stanford's recent announcement: scientists have successfully created the first truly biological transistor made entirely out of genetic material.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Your Reputation Will Be The Currency Of The Future

Your Reputation Will Be The Currency Of The Future | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
In The Nature Of The Future: Dispatches From The Socialstructed World, Marina Gorbis argues we are moving away from the depersonalized world of institutional production toward a new economy built on social connections and rewards--a process she...

Via Xaos
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I strongly believe that it is already now. At least I try to live up to it already some time ;-)

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luiy's curator insight, April 10, 2013 8:09 AM

CREATING YOUR "WEB REPUTATION"

The Whuffie Bank, for example, is a nonprofit organization dedicated to building a new currency based on reputation that can be redeemed for real and virtual products and services. The term whuffie was coined by Cory Doctorow, a science fiction writer, to denote a unit of reputation-based currency in his novel Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom. The Whuffie Bank issues whuffies based on a reputation algorithm that blends information from different social networks. It aims to build a platform that measures the online reputation of contributors on various sites. “As we develop and refine the algorithm that tracks public user activity over the net, the whuffie will become an accurate reflection of your web reputation,” the site (currently offline) explains. “And as the Internet and social networks become a large part of people’s lives, your web influence will become an increasingly accurate reflection of you.”

 

The newest and most striking incarnation of this idea can be found in an online game called Empire Avenue, which simulates a stock market in which shares in individuals can be traded and one can track individuals’ market value based on their following in various social media sites, such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and others, as well as demand for their shares by other players.

 

Commodifying social contributions--turning these into currencies that can be accumulated, hoarded, traded, and invested--may have unintended consequences. It could undermine precisely the kind of exchanges and volunteer contributions that are integral to the gift economies they are supposed to promote. In fact the word currency may be the wrong way to describe the incentives for facilitating flows inherent to social creation. The MetaCurrency Project coined the term current-see to emphasize the social flows of the exchanges it is trying to enable. Indeed, we need to invent new language and new terminology to describe the kinds of exchanges and values that comprise core elements of social production. This puts tremendous responsibility on people who design social platforms, because it is these design elements that will determine whether the platforms will foster gift exchange, competition, generosity, or new forms of greed.

We created social technologies. Our next task is to create social organizations: systems for creating not merely goods but also meaning, purpose, and greater good. Can we imagine a society of “private wealth holders whose main objective is to lead good lives, not to turn their wealth into capital?” asks political economist Robert Skidelsky. Or better yet, might they turn their wealth into a different kind of capital—social, emotional, or spiritual? Our technologies are giving us an unprecedented opportunity to do so.

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Babies' brains may be tuned to language even before birth

Babies' brains may be tuned to language even before birth | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

Despite having brains that are still largely under construction, babies born up to three months before full term can already distinguish between spoken syllables in much the same way that adults do, an imaging study has shown.

 

Full-term babies — those born after 37 weeks' gestation — display remarkable linguistic sophistication soon after they are born: they recognize their mother’s voice, can tell apart two languages they’d heard before birth and remember short stories read to them while in the womb. 

 

But exactly how these speech-processing abilities develop has been a point of contention. “The question is: what is innate, and what is due to learning immediately after birth?” asks neuroscientist Fabrice Wallois of the University of Picardy Jules Verne in Amiens, France. 

 

To answer that, Wallois and his team needed to peek at neural processes already taking place before birth. It is tough to study fetuses, however, so they turned to their same-age peers: babies born 2–3 months premature. At that point, neurons are still migrating to their final destinations; the first connections between upper brain areas are snapping into place; and links have just been forged between the inner ear and cortex.

 

To test these neural pathways, the researchers played soft voices to premature babies while they were asleep in their incubators a few days after birth, then monitored their brain activity using a non-invasive optical imaging technique called functional near-infrared spectroscopy. They were looking for the tell-tale signals of surprise that brains display — for example, when they suddenly hear male and female voices intermingled after hearing a long run of simply female voices.

 

The young brains were able to distinguish between male and female voices, as well as between the trickier sounds ‘ga’ and ‘ba’, which demands even faster processing. What is more, the parts of the cortex used were the same as those used by adults for sophisticated understanding of speech and language. 

 

The results show that linguistic connections inside the cortex are already “present and functional” and did not need to be gradually acquired through repeated exposure to sound, Wallois says. This suggests at least part of these speech-processing abilities is innate. The work could also lead to better techniques caring for the most vulnerable brains, Wallois adds, including premature babies.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Miro Svetlik's insight:

This may prove really interesting, babies can surely learn a lot new languages quicky in their early life but I think they will retain the preference (liking) for the language of some type, that might answer this (just a wild guess :)

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Lockheed Martin Harnesses Quantum Technology

Lockheed Martin Harnesses Quantum Technology | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Lockheed Martin will make commercial use of quantum computing, which could solve some business and science problems millions of times faster than can be done today.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Yes this is stuff I am excited about. I hope quantum computers will be minimized drastically in following 5 years so we can begin to hack & play with them.

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Beards Keep You Young, Healthy & Handsome, Says Science @NewNowNext

Beards Keep You Young, Healthy & Handsome, Says Science @NewNowNext | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Beards. Gentlemen, they’re not just for hipsters and the homeless any more. While both dead sexy and totally awesome, beards are also a boon to [...]
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Well maybe I shall begin to sport one ;-)

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Physicists measure speed of Einstein’s ‘spooky action at a distance’: At least 10,000 times faster than light

Physicists measure speed of Einstein’s ‘spooky action at a distance’: At least 10,000 times faster than light | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

A team of Chinese physicists have clocked the speed of spooky action at a distance — the seemingly instantaneous interaction between entangled quantum particles — at more than four orders of magnitude faster than light.

 

Their equipment and methodology doesn’t allow for an exact speed, but four orders of magnitude puts the figure at around 3 trillion meters per second.

Spooky action at a distance was a term coined by Einstein to describe how entangled quantum particles seem to interact with each other instantaneously, over any distance, breaking the speed of light and thus relativity. As of our current understanding of quantum mechanics, though, it is impossible to send data using quantum entanglement, preserving the theory of relativity. A lot of work is being done in this area, though, and some physicists believe that faster-than-light communication might be possible with some clever manipulation of entangled particles.

 

Now, thanks to these Chinese physicists — the same ones who broke the quantum teleportation distance record last year — we know that spooky action at a distance has a lower bound of four orders of magnitude faster than light, or around 3 trillion meters per second. We say “at least,” because the physicists do not rule out that spooky action is actually instantaneous — but their testing equipment and methodology simply doesn’t allow them to get any more accurate.

 

To get this figure, the physicists entangled pairs of photons at a base station, and then transmitted half of each pair to two receiving sites. The receiving sites were 15.3 kilometers (9.5mi) apart, and aligned east-west so as to minimize the interference from the Earth’s rotation (which is significant, when measuring speed on this scale). One half of the pair was then observed, and the time for the other half to assume the same state is measured. This process was repeated continuously for 12 hours to generate enough data to accurately divine the speed of spooky action.

 

According to the physicists, other research groups have tried to measure the speed of spooky action before, but they’ve all had locality loopholes — flaws in the methodology that undermine the quantum nonlocality that the experiment requires. This time, the physicists claim, all the loopholes have been closed, and that their measurement of at least 3 trillion meters per second is accurate.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I've always knew that Light-speed spaceships are just too slow to really travel the universe :). What we really need is a proper implementation of quantum transportation. So smart guys get goin...

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Leia Is Not Enough: Star Wars and the Woman Problem in Hollywood | Underwire | Wired.com

Leia Is Not Enough: Star Wars and the Woman Problem in Hollywood | Underwire | Wired.com | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
If you've never really noticed the absence of women in Star Wars (or movies at large), consider yourself living proof of how the limiting narratives of culture and media can warp our expectations.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I have recently re-watched the serie because of my kids and found it really crazy I did not have noticed this first time. Whatever we try to tell ourselves the society is male centric. We shall begin to seriously thinks about female role in the society and what cultural habits and views are enforcing upon them.

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Want to Biohack your Brain? – $50,000 Cranial Surgery Equipment costs only $10 via DIY Black Market - Transhumanity.net

Want to Biohack your Brain? – $50,000 Cranial Surgery Equipment costs only $10 via DIY Black Market - Transhumanity.net | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Nootropics are popular in our circles, but in my opinion there isn’t a non-prescription substance on the market right now that is staggeringly apparent in its effects.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Finally we are hitting next milestone in self modification. This is bigger than 3D printers printing guns or colonizing Mars for that matter. I am absolutely thrilled how will goverments and legal systems deal with this. However as with any unknown technology there will be brilliant hacks and collosal mistakes. And now seriously would you buy a brain implant from DIY Black Market?

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Hackschooling: Turning Creative Kids Into Happy Adults

Hackschooling: Turning Creative Kids Into Happy Adults | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

When 13-year-old Logan LaPlante grows up, he wants to be happy and healthy. He discusses how hacking his education is helping him achieve this goal.

Miro Svetlik's insight:

This is so true, we need to give our kids not only the ability of learn but also experiment with the latest technologies. The rest is upon them how they will employ to their success.

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30+ most beautiful places abandoned by men

30+ most beautiful places abandoned by men | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
30+ beautiful photos of fantastic abandoned places and modern ruins. From abandoned amusement parks to incredible churches and strange tunnels....

Via Alessio Erioli, luiy, Emmanuel Capitaine
Miro Svetlik's insight:

wow really charming places. I can surely take a pick and move in one of these tomorrow ;-)

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Alessio Erioli's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:14 AM

in fact, thinking on the number of individuals and biodiversity that now inhabits them more than "abandoned" I would use the adjective "reclaimed" (and the subject isn't obviously man).

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What Is Consciousness? Go to the Video! | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network

What Is Consciousness? Go to the Video! | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Various scholars have tried to explain consciousness in long articles and books, but one neuroscience pioneer has just released an unusual video blog to get the ...

Via Xaos
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Quite lot of stuff I have been pondering for quite a time is being discussed in this video blog. If we will ever fully understand mechanisms behind the consciousnes the path to implementing proper self aware AI will be opened.

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33rd Square | Chris Eliasmith Discusses SPAUN's Artificial Intelligence

33rd Square | Chris Eliasmith Discusses SPAUN's Artificial Intelligence | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Recently Nikola Danaylov of Singularity 1 on 1 interviewed Chris Eliasmith and discussed a variety of topics including the story behind his desire to create the breakthrough brain simulation, SPAUN.

Via LeapMind
Miro Svetlik's insight:

This is really something I have been dreaming to work on when I was in 2nd grade on highschool. Brilliant. Download and have fun ;-)

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