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The promised land of technology
Todays interesting ideas and inventions which I hope will form the future of mankind's technology.
Curated by Miro Svetlik
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Avegant's head-mounted virtual retinal display offers brilliant definition, we go hands-on (video)

Avegant's head-mounted virtual retinal display offers brilliant definition, we go hands-on (video) | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
We've never seen a product quite like this, and for Avegant, that's very good news. The startup's prototype virtual retinal display (VRD) delivers
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Refractive glasses instead of direct display a cool idea. I am quite curious how they will manage to cut down the size of this prototype in such a short time.

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Google in Jeopardy: What If IBM's Watson Dethroned the King of Search? | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

Google in Jeopardy: What If IBM's Watson Dethroned the King of Search? | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
After the initial Jeopardy excitement, most people forgot about Watson, the first computer ever to pass the Turing Test. But we need to pay attention, and now.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I truly percieve the coming of general AI as a next level in the web. Search providers as we know them must turn into intelligent advisor in place of current brute force query parsers which act more as a librarian. Watson have a headstart here no doubt.

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No Boy Left Behind?

No Boy Left Behind? | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Boys have been falling behind girls in academic performance and attainment. Are our boys failing, or are we failing our boys?

Via Beth Dichter
Miro Svetlik's insight:

This is so nicely outlined, except the male/female teacher part which I this is a little bit exagurated and impacts more the boys are already missing a father figure at home. The final point is to give much more detailed attention to individual boys in the learning process and as well empower teacher to do so.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 2, 2013 8:50 PM

For years we have hear "no child left behind" but what do the stats say about the boys? This infographic looks at some of the issues that may be affecting the boys coming through the education system. Are we leaving them behind?

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Yahoo Japan develops 3D search engine-printer

Yahoo Japan develops 3D search engine-printer | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Yahoo Japan Corp. has developed a voice-activated Internet search that links to a 3D printer, letting users look online for blueprints to deliver solid objects in a few minutes, the company said.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

According to this news, we are not that far away from having implemented a Matter Compiler featured in Neal Stephenson's Diamond Age (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Diamond_Age).
Oh I really love to live in this century...

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Torrex, Metro Commander, 8 Zip, Files & Folders- Now Free on Windows Store

Torrex, Metro Commander, 8 Zip, Files & Folders- Now Free on Windows Store | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
If you are using Windows 8 on your laptop or desktop, you might be using the Windows Store to install apps. We have reviewed quite a lot of Windows 8 apps on this blog.

Via Allmyapps
Miro Svetlik's insight:

However silly it may sound at first these two panel file managers are just much more embodying the concept of working with files than window concept. Unfortunately human vision can much better deal with ordered information on the places where expected. I have been using these two panel file managers from my Amiga times and still find as most efficient way to deal with files. I will be definitely giving this app a try.

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Space clean-up satellite takes off with Swiss Space Systems

EPFL's CleanSpace One satellite aims to clean up space by deorbiting debris. Thanks to a partnership with Swiss Space Systems - S3, the first janitor satellite will be deployed in 2018 using their revolutionary waste free and cost-effective launch system.

 

 


Via Stratocumulus
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Finally we are doing something about the pollution of Earth's orbit. I hope this will be a long term sustained activity.

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New element on periodic table confirmed

New element on periodic table confirmed | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Researchers in Sweden have confirmed a short-lived but super-heavy element dubbed ununpentium as its unofficial name.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I am afraid they will have to produce bigger amounts of this element and make sure it is stable for longer time. Actually I think it would be possible to create even heavier elements but their stability is an issue.

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Gingko App - A new kind of word processor

Gingko App - A new kind of word processor | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Tree documents for clarity focus and flow

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Looks pretty neat. I strongly believe in self organizing content. Hopefully I will come with some brilliant idea to incorporate such self organization method in my Content Management System.

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Hindie Becker Dershowitz's curator insight, September 3, 2013 4:39 PM

 A Tree is your brainstorm with cards and then you can join them into a paper.  Free for 3 "trees"  $9 a month for more Trees. 

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The Small and Speedy New Computer to Power “Flying Laptop” - IEEE Spectrum

The Small and Speedy New Computer to Power “Flying Laptop” - IEEE Spectrum | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
University of Stuttgart develops a computer for pint-sized satellites
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Modular sattelites with faster computing units are a must in order to offer low orbit coverage to smaller companies. The uses are countless I just hope these sattelites will have also plan to get back to the earth. Or ideally they would sort of stick on each other and form bigger objects which are easier to spot and collect.

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Amazing Photo Technique Reveals Water Like You've Never Seen It Before | Wired Design | Wired.com

Amazing Photo Technique Reveals Water Like You've Never Seen It Before | Wired Design | Wired.com | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
These photos use a novel process that captures the movement water directly, instead of just documenting the light bouncing off it.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

These are really beautiful. It is incredible how complex beautiful structures can be formed from liquid and then accented by refraction. Beauty of the physics is in detail.

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33rd Square | False Memories 'Incepted' Into Mice

33rd Square | False Memories 'Incepted' Into Mice | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
The film 'Inception' may be getting closer to becoming real. Using optogenetics, researchers have planted false memories into the minds of mice.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

People are already quite a time obsessed with understanding how memory works in the human brain. This experiment opens up new possibilities in this field. A successful solution to this problem would have a huge, even dangerous impact. Lets hope it will be used only to help the people with memory disorders.

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Parallella: a Linux-based parallel-processing supercomputer for just $99

Parallella: a Linux-based parallel-processing supercomputer for just $99 | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

Parallella, the US$99 Linux supercomputer “for everyone” is coming in a few months for the select users who ordered one-off Kickstarter. Adapteva announced at the Linux Collaboration Summit that the very first Parallella boards are up and running and the 6300 users who paid US$99 for one should get the parallel-processing units fairly soon.

 

For supercomputing, users have long relied on Linux-based machines to get the job done. It’s all down to parallel computing, which Adapteva describes as “a problem as hard as any that computer science has faced”. The team was inspired by the Arduino and Raspberry Pi, two wildly successful and commercially inexpensive  hardware projects.

 

Parallella may have an exceptionally complicated origin, but the consumer unit seems to be simple as Raspberry Pi. The “credit card” sized board will run off an SD card (preloaded with a Linux-based OS, Ubuntu in this video) and work with mostly any display that can output HDMI. The intro video shows off Adapteva CEO Andreas Olofsson’s creation being operated by his young daughter. With very little hassle, we can see how quickly the board boots and runs as it turns an LED TV into a powerful computer.

 

In the video introduction, Olofsson says “We love designing chips. Parallel computing needs to be open, we want to do introduce a completely open-source toolset to enable next-level computing.”

 

The hardware specifications for US$99 seem to be unconstrained by cost. Parallella runs on a dual-core ARM A9 CPU, 1GB RAM, an Epiphany Multicore Accelerator (16 or 64 cores), comes with two USB 2.0 ports, ethernet, HDMI and ships with the free Epiphany development tools made up of a C compiler, multicore debugger, Eclipse IDE, OpenCL SDK/compiler, and runtime libraries. The video below demonstrates the impressive processing power of the US$99 supercomputer as it “handily beats an x86 based processor on a key mathematical kernel while consuming a fraction of the power.”

 

The team admits that parallel computing is the only way forward, and that we shouldn’t have to wait for the industry to “come around” to this fact. Commitment is what drives team-Parallella forward. “Together we can launch a full on attack on the daunting problem of converting the software industry to parallel over the next few years after 70 years dominated by serial programming,” says the Kickstarter page. Parallella quickly reached its funding goal of US$750 000, almost reaching an impressive US$900 000.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Excellent, I always wanted to have at least 4 such boards to really begin tinkering with neural nets. Who know maybe I will order some.

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The biggest opportunity in mobile right now isn’t on smartphones

The biggest opportunity in mobile right now isn’t on smartphones | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Facebook has noticed something that other companies would do well to heed: The biggest opportunity right now isn’t in smartphones, where users are bombarded by the fruits of an ever-more-competitive market for apps and mobile services.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

They are very dead right on this assumption. Third world does not have money for top notch devices but lot of people who want to use the net. And they will undergo any burden of advertising as far as the service is free. I hope for these young people that as soon as their economy will boost they awareness about advertising will rise.

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Windows 9

Windows 9 | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I cannot but commence desktop efforts of Microsoft, these previews of Windows 9 possible desktop show that they really try to implement innovative ideas. However it still makes me think about my older custom desktop themes in enlightenment 0.17.

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Surprisingly simple scheme for self-assembling robots

Surprisingly simple scheme for self-assembling robots | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
In 2011, when an MIT senior named John Romanishin proposed a new design for modular robots to his robotics professor, Daniela Rus, she said, 'That can't be done.'
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I am certain that this is the future for domestic robotics. Basically all appliance will reconfigure it self into most useful shape for given task.

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Intel researcher debuts 3D-printed, open source robot Jimmy ...

Intel researcher debuts 3D-printed, open source robot Jimmy ... | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Meet Jimmy the 21st Century Robot. The artificial intelligence, or brains, of the robot is open source. So is the design and the technical description for printing him out as a 3D object. So feel free to clone the robot.

Via Scott Turner
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Probably I should have a go at it with my kids. I think instead of computers as a dreamed of toy in my childhood, my children will crave these sort of robots. Let's look towards the future.

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Brazil looks to break from US-centric Internet

Brazil looks to break from US-centric Internet | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil plans to divorce itself from the U.S.-centric Internet over Washington's widespread online spying, a move that many experts fear will be a potentially dangerous first step toward fracturing a global network built with...


Via LeapMind
Miro Svetlik's insight:

A controversial news from Brazil. On one way opposition is right that internet should be decentralized and free but on the other hand it is true that huge percentage of internet services are US based. So who is to decide what should be done. Hopefully internet will escape local legislation and a control by its own wild growth because if any geocentric instance will try to take the control or impose the rules, freedom of digital communication will die painful death. 

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Animations: This Thing Called Science

Animations: This Thing Called Science | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
We're thrilled to launch our next series of animations: This Thing Called Science. This series follows on from Critical Thinking, showing the way we think scientifically by considering skepticism, ...

Via Beth Dichter
Miro Svetlik's insight:

These cartoons are really sweet and very well done. Nice way to explain the though process behind the science, make sure to see at least one of them.

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mtmeme's curator insight, September 13, 2013 9:09 AM

Great series for introduction to scientific concepts and research methods. When we are aware of sources of bias we can devise ways to test for it or eliminate it. 

Hanis's curator insight, July 22, 2014 3:50 PM

Learn more about Science by first understanding the Scientific Process. These videos above make it much more easier to understand the topic. 

Derek McCormack's curator insight, October 8, 2014 11:35 PM

Bridge 8 are good peeps

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Researchers claim 'almost instantaneous' quantum computing breakthrough

Researchers claim 'almost instantaneous' quantum computing breakthrough | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

Silicon is great, but we're tickling the edges of its speed limit. As a result, researchers at Oregon State University have been plugging away at a


Via LeapMind
Miro Svetlik's insight:

This sounds really interesting and if true it would improve the speed of conventional computing by a great margin, not even talking about energy saving.

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Did Life Come to Earth From Mars?

Did Life Come to Earth From Mars? | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Mineralogical clues point to the idea that the early Earth, starved of oxygen and submerged by a vast ocean, needed molecules from Mars to kick start life (Did Life Come to Earth From Mars?
Miro Svetlik's insight:

This is an interesting out-of-the-box idea. Though there is a need for better explanation how were basic compounds of life transferred from Mars to the Earth considering that Mars had an atmosphere. Well still worth of researching.

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33rd Square | System That Merges Human and Artificial Intelligence Awarded US Patent

33rd Square | System That Merges Human and Artificial Intelligence Awarded US Patent | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
A research team have devised a system that merges human and computer intelligence to support decision-making in crisis situations. The invention recently received a US patent.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I have a feeling that we will see humans augmented with artificial intelligence sooner than autonomous humanoid robots driven by AI. The human acceptance treshold will be most likely lower for such extensions than for robots.

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Christopher Strevens Nuclear Reactor - PESWiki

Christopher Strevens Nuclear Reactor - PESWiki | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

Four years ago, then 66-year-old inventor from London, Dr. Christopher Strevens, began posting a website with instructions of how to build his "fusion reactor", which he says: "Creates helium from hydrogen.

 

It also captures the power given off during the reaction as electrical power."

 

He also posted several videos to YouTube showing his prototype in operation, and showing the different color of gas from before versus after; as well as showing spectral analysis that indicates that the hydrogen that he puts into the system has transmuted to helium -- a nuclear phenomenon.

 

He said: "I found that when I increased the exciter power to 800 Watts the output rose to 2,000 Watts [2.5-times overunity], and when I isolated the reactor from the exciter this power remained. The spark gap regulator became active keeping the power at this level. I only allowed this for a short time before reconnecting the exciter and turning the power down and the reaction ceased."


Via Sepp Hasslberger
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Quite a kitchen science here ;-) it does pretty much show that to pursue your scientific interests you do not need always a big lab with cohort of apprentices.

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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, August 27, 2013 6:50 PM

Plasma fusion with transmutation of hydrogen into helium ... brings to mind the question: Why is it that garage inventor with limited means seems to be able to achieve what has been eluding the best of our fusion scientists with billions in funding. Are the scientists working on a wrong theoretical basis?

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The Possible Parallel Universe of Dark Matter

The Possible Parallel Universe of Dark Matter | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
As researchers learn more about dark matter's complexities, it seems possible that our galaxy lives on top of a shadow galaxy without us even knowing it.

 

All known particles make up only a small fraction of the energy density in our universe, yet the Standard Model is extremely complicated: three forces, one Higgsed, one confining, plus quarks and leptons organized into three generations. This model—the components of the visible universe—
deviates markedly from any apparent principle of minimality. Yet, when considering the 85% of the matter in the universe that is dark, our usual response is to turn to minimal models of a cold, collisionless particle: a WIMP, perhaps, or an axion.

 

Two recent advances hint at just how much we have been missing about the dark side. In January 2012, Christoph Weniger, a physicist at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, started noticing hints of a strange type of radiation around the center of our galaxy. To his excitement, he realized that the glow could be a signal of dark-matter particles smashing into each other and, in the process, transforming from something invisible to something visible. If so, it might finally be possible to go beyond simply deducing where dark matter gathers, and start learning how it actually behaves.

 

The other shoe dropped earlier this year, when a group of Harvard University theorists, including Lisa Randall and JiJi Fan, formulated a new theory of dark matter. One of the oddest things about Weniger’s detection, Randall notes, is that it was possible at all. “The signal would be too small for you to see under most reasonable models of dark matter,” she says. But Randall and her collaborators realized they could tidily explain the observation if there were a second type of dark matter out there: one that is not as diffuse as the dominant component of dark matter, but can interact with itself, just like visible matter. Clumps of this interacting kind of dark matter could form a disk, collapsing into a plane that could produce a correspondingly concentrated signal like the one Weniger saw.

 

Acknowledging that dark matter might have some of the same kind of diversity as visible matter may seem a minor adjustment. But it’s one that has, as Randall narrates in an excited staccato, “super-dramatic consequences.” If one variety of dark matter can clump together, it could form a panoply of previously unimagined dark structures. It could ball up into dark stars surrounded by dark planets made of dark atoms. In the most extravagant leap of possibility, this new kind of dark matter might even allow the existence of dark life.

 

Getting mainstream scientists to move past their light-matter chauvinism and take that shadow world seriously will require some highly convincing evidence. Weniger frets that the Fermi observations are too ambiguous to do the trick. “What one needs is more data with the same experiment to establish that the signal is there,” he says. 

 

Harvard astronomer Douglas Finkbeiner is making an independent analysis of the Fermi data and likewise is finding that his results hang halfway between verification and falsification. “It’s the most frustrating possible outcome,” he sighs. “One option is that the signal is just not as bright as we thought it was.” 

 

Randall is ready to forge ahead regardless of the fate of this particular observation. “The gamma ray line may not stay, but this just turns out to be independently such an interesting scenario, with so many interesting implications,” she says. And if our galaxy really does live right on top of a shadow galaxy, there are other ways to prove it.

 

Researchers are working on a new European space observatory called Gaia, scheduled to launch this autumn, which should perform a particularly telling test. Gaia will map the locations and velocities of about 1 billion stars within the Milky Way. Searching for anomalous motions could shade in the outlines of an invisible, dense disk of dark matter pulling on those stars. 

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Miro Svetlik's insight:

This is a nice one and I like the idea, however I am asking myself what features are causing dark world weigth to be so much more than barryonic matter? Symmetrical anti particles idea is condemned to the fairyland.

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NASA Announces Results of Epic Space-Time Experiment - NASA Science

NASA Announces Results of Epic Space-Time Experiment - NASA Science | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
NASA has announced the results of an epic physics experiment which confirms the reality of a space-time vortex around our planet.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

We have again pushed our knowledge of universe structure even further. What other surprises might still wait for us in the fabric of time.

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The future of programming - O'Reilly Radar

The future of programming - O'Reilly Radar | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Programming is changing. The PC era is coming to an end, and software developers now work with an explosion of devices, job functions, and problems that need different approaches from the...
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Yes this will only stress the fact that good programmers are not only solving technical problems but are in fact linguists-translators. Because hands down how many programming projects you have ever working on used only one language?

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