The promised land of technology
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Movies of the Future

Movies of the Future | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

EARLIER this month, at a symposium at the University of Southern California film school, George Lucas and Steven Spielberg predicted the collapse of most megabudget movies, and with it the end of Hollywood as it now exists. This sounds like bad news for popcorn sellers. But Mr. Lucas and Mr. Spielberg had intriguing ideas about what might come next.

Mr. Lucas predicted that blockbusters would eventually become big-ticket events, like ballgames and Broadway plays, and that the rest of the movie business would migrate to online video — a trend that’s already begun to happen.

 

Mr. Spielberg offered a more radical vision. At a time of ubiquitous screens — video, movie and computer — he predicted an end to on-screen entertainment. Instead, he said he thought we’d have a kind of enveloping, wraparound entertainment.

 

“We’re never going to be totally immersive as long as we’re looking at a square, whether it’s a movie screen or whether it’s a computer screen,” Mr. Spielberg said. “We’ve got to get rid of that and put the player inside the experience, where no matter where you look you’re surrounded by a three-dimensional experience. That’s the future.”

 

Though most people treat screens as a window, Mr. Spielberg seems to understand them as a barrier, one that prevents viewers — now “players” — from being fully, actively engaged in their entertainment.

 

The idea of immersive entertainment — in which you can lose yourself and in which the line between fiction and reality blurs — isn’t new at all. And its impact can be disorienting.

 

The title character in Cervantes’s 17th-century satire, “Don Quixote,” went tilting at windmills, for example, because he had immersed himself in the practice of reading. “He read all night from sundown to dawn, and all day from sunup to dusk until with virtually no sleep and so much reading he dried out his brain and lost his sanity.” Quixote’s endearing madness suggests the degree to which art in general and reading in particular might literally derange one’s faculties.

 

Centuries later, Orson Welles showed that radio could have similarly disturbing powers. When Welles broadcast a live radio dramatization of “The War of the Worlds” in 1938, thousands of listeners believed Martians had actually invaded New Jersey. Despite repeated announcements that the radio play was fiction, panicked listeners phoned police stations, rushed into churches to pray, even volunteered to take up arms. Some listeners packed their belongings and prepared to evacuate.

 

Today, of course, losing oneself in a book or broadcast is familiar and feels safe and even old-fashioned. And immersive entertainment has moved into the realm of video games and beyond, making strides in the direction Mr. Spielberg envisions.

 

The most advanced immersive entertainment on the horizon now may be the Oculus Rift, a strap-on virtual-reality headset. Virtual reality, a catchall term for digital simulations that can be experienced with goggles, earphones and, in some cases, gloves, enjoyed a brief vogue in the late 1980s; now, with far more advanced computer capabilities, it seems on the verge of a comeback. To demonstrate the Oculus Rift’s capacity, developers created a “guillotine simulator” that, even in its primitive form, seems to be a big — frightening — hit with those who have tried it. Twist your neck and you see crowds of spectators; look down and you see the basket waiting for your head. But at the end of the day, you’re just lying there with a box strapped to your face, staring into a pair of screens.

 

No one has yet managed to invent a technology that dispenses with screens entirely, as Mr. Spielberg envisions.

 

But Gene Roddenberry, who created “Star Trek,” offered a blueprint for this kind of entertainment in “Star Trek: The Next Generation,” the 1987 follow-up to his original series. In the pilot episode, the first officer of the Starship Enterprise enters the ship’s “holodeck,” a chamber specially outfitted to project a holographic simulation of reality; the first officer, for example, walks into the room and experiences a verdant woodland.

 

The fictional holodeck in “Star Trek” didn’t depend entirely on holographic illusion; it also relied on fanciful “matter replicators” capable of transforming energy into a chair you could sit in or tea you could drink. Thanks to sophisticated programming, it provided an extraordinary range of entertainment possibilities for the Enterprise crew: they could, for example, enjoy a simulated ride on the Orient Express or fight a simulated Battle of the Alamo.

 

Life-size holograms and energy-to-matter converters are probably a ways off. For the moment, the closest we have come to a holodeck-like experience may be immersive theater.

 

“Sleep No More” and “Then She Fell” are two current theatrical productions that dispense with the traditional stage and dissolve the barrier between performer and viewer. Instead, the audience interacts directly with the characters in the play.

 

It is not surprising that such productions have been called “theater for the video game generation.” They combine the first person engagement of video games like “Grand Theft Auto” and “BioShock” with the warmth and emotional engagement of flesh-and-blood interactions.

 

“Sleep No More” is presented in a series of interconnected rooms, and it is viscerally engaging to stand a few feet away as Macbeth and Lady Macbeth hurl each other against the walls, or later as Macbeth cringes naked in a bloody bathtub. It feels personal and intimate in a way that conventional plays or movies cannot — and in a way that digital simulations can’t either.

In that sense, at least, the future Mr. Spielberg imagined is already here — at least in a limited way that is available just to a small group of people who can attend the performances. Now, if we just had some technology that would scale things up. Mr. Spielberg, we’re ready.

 

Frank Rose is the author of “The Art of Immersion: How the Digital Generation is Remaking Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and the Way We Tell Stories.”


Via James Keith
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I have been dreaming of my virtual-reality-holographic-matter-transformation-holodeck already for some time so Mr. Spielberg you did not invent anything new :). No seriously if this is the natural progression of entertainment industry then Holywood have something to fear. In many such productions there will be no possibility to retouche and cut. Because immersive reality show is a reality after all.

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The promised land of technology
Todays interesting ideas and inventions which I hope will form the future of mankind's technology.
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America’s biggest chip manufacturers have admitted that transistors are about to stop shrinking

America’s biggest chip manufacturers have admitted that transistors are about to stop shrinking | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
In the next five years, it will be too expensive to further miniaturize—but chip makers will innovate in different ways.
Miro Svetlik's insight:
Have we finally hit the top of Moore's law? I don't think so, we just have to look at different materials and concepts as a silicon. There is huge potential in Quantum and Bio computing ahead of us. Go explore!
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Unique optical trapping system offers way to launch high-power laser light

Unique optical trapping system offers way to launch high-power laser light | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Researchers have demonstrated, for the first time, that laser light can be used to manipulate a glass optical fiber tapered to a sharp point smaller than a speck of dust, in the middle of an optical fiber with a hollow core. ...
Miro Svetlik's insight:
This discovery can have a big impact not only on physics but on laser cutting and 3D printing.
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Researchers create super-efficient Wi-Fi

Researchers create super-efficient Wi-Fi | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Passive Wi-Fi consumes 1/10,000th the power of conventional wireless networks.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Finally some sensible solution to ever power hungry wifi connectivity, making it possible to incorporate wifi into small devices with low energy footprint.

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New polymer developed that can “remember” and shapeshift

New polymer developed that can “remember” and shapeshift | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
3D printing has truly evolved in the past year, but did you know that some 3D printers can even recreate the complex shapes of origami? But, what if you wanted to unfold your 3D printed crane or lotus flower and refold it into something else? This is easy using paper, but more difficult using the hard plastic of 3D printing.

 

Research by Qian Zhao and colleagues, published in the journal Science Advances, details a new method involving shape memory polymers, a unique class of polymers that can be “programmed” to assume certain shapes. After the polymer is programmed, its shape can be temporarily altered by subsequent heating. However, upon cooling, the polymer will return to its programmed shape, a process known as recovery. In other words, the plastic “remembers” the shape it was originally programmed to achieve.


Although this is a useful ability in itself, what if we wanted to change the programmed shape after it is already programmed, like unfolding  a crane origami and refolding  it into a lotus flower? Here, the authors revealed their experiments with a cross-linked polycaprolactone polymer system. This polymer showed a large degree of plasticity, meaning that it could be programmed to “remember” one shape, and then reprogrammed to remember another. In addition, this material can show cumulative plasticity, the ability to retain some of the characteristics of previously-programmed shapes, even when its shape is later changed to something completely different!


The unprecedented flexibility is shown in their first experiment, where a flat, square-shaped film was programmed to assume the shape of an origami bird. When heated, the bird became “elastic”, meaning it could be deformed into various temporary shapes, such as a plane.  Upon cooling, however, the polymer would return to the programmed bird shape. As describe above, this ability is not new. However, using a transesterification reaction catalyzed by a neutralized organic base, the authors were able to reprogram the recovered bird into a drastically different permanent structure – that of an origami sailboat. This boat, in turn, could be heated to create new temporary shapes, such as a windmill. Upon cooling, the shape then recovered to the sailboat shape.


In their next experiment, they programmed a flat film of polymer five consecutive times. During the first four deformations, the film was given different surface features by stretching and embossing. Each plastic deformation built on the previous one, creating a progressively more complicated pattern on the surface of the film.  In the last stage, the film was programmed to roll into a tube so that the surface pattern lined the inside of the tube. Therefore, one could even add textures on surfaces that aren’t actually accessible in the final shape.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Miro Svetlik's insight:

New materials are new frontier of 3D printing I believe. Advances we can make with new materials will be differentiators in 3D printing industry in next decade.

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Google, NASA: Our quantum computer is 100 million times faster than a normal PC

Google, NASA: Our quantum computer is 100 million times faster than a normal PC | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
But only for very specific optimisation problems.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I've predicted this to happen some two years ago. Now it is slowly becoming the truth. Welcome in brave new world of Quantum computing.

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Physicists say energy can be teleported ‘without a limit of distance’

Physicists say energy can be teleported ‘without a limit of distance’ | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
A team of physicists has proposed a way of teleporting energy over long distances. The technique, which is purely theoretical at this point, takes advantage of the strange quantum phenomenon of entanglement where two particles share the same existence. The researchers, who work out of Tohoku University in Japan, and led by Masahiro Hotta,describe their ...
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Again a step closer to the teleportation ;-). If we would manage to teleport energy as described here we can exploit sun or even our earth core for clean and practically limitless energy for our civilization.

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The AI Revolution: Road to Superintelligence - Wait But Why

The AI Revolution: Road to Superintelligence - Wait But Why | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
The topic everyone in the world should be talking about.

Via Xaos
Miro Svetlik's insight:

We all talk about exponential future and why we have to keep our eyes glued on AI but I did not read an article yet so comprehensively written on this topic. I find it summarizes most threats to humanity and helps us partially understand what might come.

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Productivity Future Vision - YouTube

Learn more at: http://microsoft.com/productivityvision How could emerging technologies transform the way we get things done 5-10 years in the future? Watch K...

Via Geoffrey Aubert
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I remember when Microsoft announced some years ago their efforts to patent transparent touch screens with ability to let feel a texture of surface. I knew they were busy on something cool. They are still going the same way as is apparent from this productivity video. I hope they will be able to execute their vision.

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Building interleaving and spaced practice into our pedagogy | Great Maths Teaching Ideas

Building interleaving and spaced practice into our pedagogy | Great Maths Teaching Ideas | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Interleaving should be a very important part of learning process, specially because our cognitive process is not designed for monotone information processing. Variety of topics and playful teaching should be a norm not an exception in a modern school system.

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East Asia is More “Transhumanist” than the USA & Europe - BrighterBrains.org

East Asia is More “Transhumanist” than the USA & Europe - BrighterBrains.org | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Transhumanism is a “Western philosophy” - it’s roots can be traced to FM-2030 (born in Iran, but lived and taught in New York, Los Angeles, and Miami) and Max More (born in England, founded Extropy Institute in California, currently CEO of Alcor in Arizona). Transhumanism today is primarily identified with Humanity Plus, a nonprofit affiliated with two California groups - Singularity Institute and Foresight Institute, plus Utah’s Mormon Transhumanist Association.…
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Interesting observations on state of Western and Asian trans-humanism. We need to acknowledge trans-humanists not as a class but a natural step to evolution brought by the research and technology. Humans have tendency to improve their life by medicaments or drugs for ages. This need to be stronger, more efficient or just smarter can change with the help of technology to much more radical changes. Our technology have reached the level where we can alter basic building blocks and programs of life. East Asian society is probably more prepared for this next step than the western one. Hopefully we will recognize the importance of the fact that our society must open it's eyes and try to understand pragmatic trans-humanism as a possible next step in the evolution of human.

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'Fibonacci quasiparticle' could form basis of future quantum computers

'Fibonacci quasiparticle' could form basis of future quantum computers | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
(Phys.org)—Topological quantum computing (TQC) is a newer type of quantum computing that uses 'braids' of particle tracks, rather than actual particles such as ions and electrons, as the qubits to implement computations. Using braids has one important advantage: it makes TQCs practically immune to ...
Miro Svetlik's insight:

New type of quantum computing using braiding anyons to implement logical gates. This is next step towards fault-tolerant quantum computing.

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Global quantum communications—no longer the stuff of fiction?

Global quantum communications—no longer the stuff of fiction? | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

Neither quantum computers nor quantum cryptography will become prevalent technologies without memory systems able to manipulate quantum information easily and effectively.


Via LeapMind
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Easy to implement quantum memory is a key to next development in this area of computing. I hope this will enable quantum devices to go mainstream.

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What Does Wi-Fi Sound Like?

What Does Wi-Fi Sound Like? | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
A project called Phantom Terrains sniffs out signals and translates them into an augmented soundscape.

Via Alessio Erioli
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Ever wondered how it sound when computers are communicating? Well Wifi is waves afterall only not audible to us. This is an interesting attempt to make it more reachable and maybe even artistic in some way.

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Isabelle Lefebvre's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:02 AM

Tout à fait adapté à une illustration de l'ISEN.

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Airbus Subsidiary Designs World’s First 3D-Printed Aluminum Motorcycle | Aluminum Insider

Airbus Subsidiary Designs World’s First 3D-Printed Aluminum Motorcycle | Aluminum Insider | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Airbus Subsidiary Designs World’s First 3D-Printed Aluminum Motorcycle | Aluminum Insider
Miro Svetlik's insight:
Laser sintering is an exciting technology and provides reliable 3D metal structures. Unfortunately this technology is also complex and expensive. I hope we can provide novel way to print metal objects.
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You can now 3D print one of the world’s lightest materials

You can now 3D print one of the world’s lightest materials | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it

Aerogels are among the world’s lightest materials. Graphene aerogel, a record holder in that category, is so light that a large block of it wouldn’t make a dent on a tiny ball of cotton. Water is about one thousand times more dense. The minimal density of aerogels allows for a number of possible applications, researchers have found, ranging from soaking up oil spills to “invisibility” cloaks.

 

Now, scientists from State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo and Kansas State University report in the journal Small that they have found a way to 3D print graphene aerogel, which has only been used in lab prototypes. This technology will make the material much easier to use, and open it, and hopefully other aerogel materials, up to wider applications.

 

Graphene is just a single layer of carbon atoms. Since it was isolated for the first time in 2004, it has been touted as a wonder material for its strength, pliability and conductivity. Aerogel is essentially a gel where the liquid is replaced by air. Graphene aerogel is known to be highly compressible (so it can bear pressure without breaking apart) and highly conductive (so it can carry electricity efficiently). The very structure of the material that gives it these properties, however, makes it difficult to manufacture using 3D printing technology.

 

SUNY Buffalo and Kansas State University researchers came up with a solution. They mixed graphene oxide—graphene with extra oxygen atoms—with water and deposited layers on a surface at -25°C. This instantly froze each layer, and allowed the undisrupted construction of the aerogel, with ice as its support.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Miro Svetlik's insight:
3D Printing aerogels containing graphene? This material gets some interesting properties. While it is quite hard to manufacture in a controlled fashion I believe it will open the way for compressible circuits.
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NASA, Made in Space think big with Archinaut, a robotic 3D printing demo bound for ISS - SpaceNews.com

NASA, Made in Space think big with Archinaut, a robotic 3D printing demo bound for ISS - SpaceNews.com | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Within five years, companies could begin in-orbit manufacturing and assembly of communications satellite reflectors or other large structures, according to Made in Space, the Silicon Valley startup that sent the first 3D printer to the International Space Station in 2014.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

3D printing in space is inevitable and should be one of our priorities as mankind if we want to settle the solar system. We at ContentWise are excited to see what technology will Made In Space create in order to build big structures in zero gravity. http://contentwise.info/printrod

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Creative people’s brains really do work differently

Creative people’s brains really do work differently | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
What makes highly creative people different from the rest of us? In the 1960s, psychologist and creativity researcher Frank X. Barron set about finding out. Barron conducted a series of experiments on some of his generation’s most renowned thinkers in an attempt to isolate the unique spark of creative genius. In a historic study, Barron...
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Messiness of artistic people scientifically deciphered and the answer as we could of guess already is complexity. Many facets, many expressions, many experiences, keep iterating... and be a beautiful human 

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ContentWise - PrintRod

ContentWise - PrintRod | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I would like to introduce our PrintRod, our portable - high volume - low resolution 3D Printer prototype. We believe that mass adoption of 3D printing is kept back by inability to print larger objects anywhere and with low energy footprint. Check it out at http://contentwise.info/printrod/ .

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Chemists Invent New Letters for Nature’s Genetic Alphabet

Chemists Invent New Letters for Nature’s Genetic Alphabet | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Scientists hope that new genetic letters, created in the lab, will endow DNA with new powers.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

It would be quite interesting if we can extend and improve our genetic code. Certainly with current boom in biotechnology it wont take long to consider this kind of improvement.

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The Dumbest Question You Can Ask a Scientist

The Dumbest Question You Can Ask a Scientist - How to Fly a Horse - Medium
No one who knows the history of science would ask this question.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

Kevin perfectly summarized what is the value of science and research. To me immediately came Peter Thiel's analogy of 0 to 1 (http://zerotoonebook.com). This is a perfect explanation why people do not get the value of research, it offers no tangible insight how it might impact not only economy but a mankind as such.

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What is the real cost of your online attention? – Tom Chatfield – Aeon

What is the real cost of your online attention? – Tom Chatfield – Aeon | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
It costs nothing to click, respond and retweet. But what price do we pay in our relationships and our peace of mind?
Miro Svetlik's insight:

A thoughtful article about 'Attention Economic' and as well examination of our purpose in adjusting our focus to information feeds competing for our attention. Author touches as well on something I call fractal zoom or complexity vs detail paradigm. With focus, things become more detailed and complex every time we manage to get closer to them. Maybe we shall sometimes focus more to ourselves and things we do to our surroundings as to try to catch all news around us in fear not to miss anything.

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How To Master Your Third Arm

How To Master Your Third Arm | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Because in a virtual world, why should you only have two?
Miro Svetlik's insight:

I am happy there are scientists (Lanier) which do not think in an conventional 'Virtual Reality' constraints. One big truth we seem to oversee when dealing with virtual that it is 'virtual' and it does not have to necessarily imitate our worldly experiences. Through experiments like this we can maybe find a better more efficient way to control the events in Virtual Reality.

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CyberPower’s Fang Trinity redefines the concept PC with off-the-shelf components | ExtremeTech

CyberPower’s Fang Trinity redefines the concept PC with off-the-shelf components | ExtremeTech | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
High concept PCs are a common sight at CES, but CyberPower's Fang Trinity is one heck of an interesting build. The company says it plans to launch the chassis inside three months, using standard, off-the-shelf components.
Miro Svetlik's insight:

It is quite a time I have seen a PC that would catch my eye. Well this concept has it all :) simplicity of common replaceable components, design which made me think of 'The Battlestar Galactica' and power enough to be current. Hopefully it will make it to the shelfs.

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45-year physics mystery shows a path to quantum transistors

45-year physics mystery shows a path to quantum transistors | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
An odd, iridescent material that's puzzled physicists for decades turns out to be an exotic state of matter that could open a new path to quantum computers and other next-generation electronics.

Physicists at the University of Michigan have discovered or confirmed several properties of the compound samarium hexaboride that raise hopes for finding the silicon of the quantum era. They say their results also close the case of how to classify the material—a mystery that has been investigated since the late 1960s.

The researchers provide the first direct evidence that samarium hexaboride, abbreviated SmB6, is a topological insulator. Topological insulators are, to physicists, an exciting class of solids that conduct electricity like a metal across their surface, but block the flow of current like rubber through their interior. They behave in this two-faced way despite that their chemical composition is the same throughout.

The U-M scientists used a technique called torque magnetometry to observe tell-tale oscillations in the material's response to a magnetic field that reveal how electric current moves through it. Their technique also showed that the surface of samarium hexaboride holds rare Dirac electrons, particles with the potential to help researchers overcome one of the biggest hurdles in quantum computing.

These properties are particularly enticing to scientists because SmB6 is considered a strongly correlated material. Its electrons interact more closely with one another than most solids. This helps its interior maintain electricity-blocking behavior.

This deeper understanding of samarium hexaboride raises the possibility that engineers might one day route the flow of electric current in quantum computers like they do on silicon in conventional electronics, said Lu Li, assistant professor of physics in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and a co-author of a paper on the findings published in Science.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Miro Svetlik's insight:

New compounds like this are much needed to simplify the production or even make breakthrough for new kind of quantum circuits. If we harness their properties quantum computing will be again a step closer to the mainstream.

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The Myth Of AI | Edge.org

The Myth Of AI | Edge.org | The promised land of technology | Scoop.it
Miro Svetlik's insight:

An incredible article about the myths & reality of AI threats. If the real AGI will ever be implemented there is a big chance it will have no interests as we imagine. These are our own projections based on anthropomorphic thinking. AGI will have a impact on our reality, however it will not step out as a divine presence like in the myths.

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