Project on Civil Right and Historical Land Marks
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Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site (U.S. National Park Service)

Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site (U.S. National Park Service) | Project on Civil Right and Historical Land Marks | Scoop.it
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From Tuskegee Alabama

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Welcome To Our Exhibits

Welcome To Our Exhibits | Project on Civil Right and Historical Land Marks | Scoop.it
Tuskegee Human & Civil Rights Multicultural Center
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"Welcome to the Tuskegee Human and Civil Rights Multicultural Center's Exhibits Section. Our permanent Exhibits are categorized by three major sections. Each section identifies a key role in the formation of Tuskegee/Macon County and its history. Most of our exhibits are interactive, which allows you to bring to life some of the unique experiences that help transform Tuskegee and Macon County."
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The Stand in the School House

"The Stand in the Schoolhouse Door took place at Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama on June 11, 1963.George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama, in a symbolic attempt to keep his inaugural promise of "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever" and stop the desegregation of schools, stood at the door of the auditorium to try to block the entry of two black students, Vivian Malone Jones and James Hood.[1]

The incident brought George Wallace into the national spotlight."

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ciara's curator insight, February 6, 2014 2:26 AM

On a scorching june day in 1963, James Hood and Vivian Malone became the first black students to enroll successfully at the university of alabama defying Governor George Wallace Jr.’s symbolic — and vitriolic — ‘‘stand in the schoolhouse door.’’ this is an eample of racial sergregation going on in the south of this time frame

De'Andre King's curator insight, February 2, 2015 9:54 PM

This stand created a very insecure statue between blacks and whites. I feel like the Governor showed a public display of sentiment and he had no right. As a political leader you should not verbally or physically take sides in community disputes, but aim to peacefully negotiate the result.

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Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church & Parsonage: Montgomery, AL

Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church & Parsonage: Montgomery, AL | Project on Civil Right and Historical Land Marks | Scoop.it

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Bloody Sunday, Revisited

Bloody Sunday, Revisited | Project on Civil Right and Historical Land Marks | Scoop.it

by LINCOLN CAPLAN, NY Times


March 7, 1965, became known as Bloody Sunday in the annals of the civil rights struggle in America. That day, around 500 people set out to march the 54 miles from Selma, Ala., to the state capital in Montgomery in support of what would become the Voting Rights Act.

The voting rights movement was transformed into a national cause when the marchers were stopped on the Edmund Pettus Bridge as they left Selma. A state trooper told them they were “an unlawful assembly” and ordered them to disperse. When they did not, they were attacked by about 150 troopers and others who wielded billy clubs and tear gas. Fifty-eight people were treated for injuries at a local hospital, including Representative John Lewis, then 25 and chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, for a skull fracture.

Two weeks later, after a federal judge ruled they had a constitutional right to march, the group set out again, under National Guard protection. It was 25,000 strong by the time the march ended on March 25 in Montgomery. That summer, the Voting Rights Act became law.

A commemoration of the march is scheduled to begin Sunday in Selma, led by Mr. Lewis and Vice President Joseph Biden Jr., and will end in Montgomery on Friday. Its urgent purpose is to underscore why the Supreme Court must uphold a central provision of the Voting Rights Act, which is now under challenge in Shelby County, Ala. v. Holder. That provision — Section 5 — applies in Alabama and other places where voting discrimination remains much worse than elsewhere in the country. It requires that any change in voting rules be preapproved by the Justice Department or a special court in Washington. Without this provision, there would be no way to prevent new efforts to block blacks and Hispanics from voting or to reduce their electoral power.

The justices heard oral argument on the Shelby County case last Wednesday. This week’s events in Alabama should remind them of the enormous cost many Americans have paid to win the right to vote, and why that remains under persistent threat and must be defended.

 

[see historic footage]


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Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church & Parsonage: Montgomery, AL

Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church & Parsonage: Montgomery, AL | Project on Civil Right and Historical Land Marks | Scoop.it
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"Dexter Parsonage Museum, historic home to twelve pastors of the Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church from 1920-1992, was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. It was restored in 2003 by the Dexter Avenue King Memorial Foundation, Inc., under the direction of church members, acting as an Authentication Committee."

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Rosa Parks at Mme. Tussauds

Rosa Parks at Mme. Tussauds | Project on Civil Right and Historical Land Marks | Scoop.it
Her arrest led to the Montgomery Bus Boycott http://t.co/8uLbCNlwmb #CivilRights #waxmuseum

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Peggy Terrell's curator insight, July 20, 2013 10:03 PM

Wax Museum Rosa Parks

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16th Street Baptist Church bombing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

16th Street Baptist Church bombing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama was bombed on Sunday, September 15, 1963 as an act of white supremacist terrorism. The explosion at the African-American church, which killed four girls, marked a turning point in the United States 1960s Civil Rights Movement and contributed to support for passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.


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Letter from a Birmingham Jail [King, Jr.]

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These are Dr. Martin Luther King's letters from the Birmingham Jail, April 16, 1963

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G.W. Carver Interpretive Museum - Dothan - Alabama.travel

G.W. Carver Interpretive Museum - Dothan - Alabama.travel | Project on Civil Right and Historical Land Marks | Scoop.it
The G.W. Carver Interpretive Museum is rich in history! Once a Greyhound Bus Station, the building was purchased by Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. in 2000 and transformed into a landmark that honors the legacy and impact of Dr. George Washington Carver and many other African-Americans.
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Tuskegee Airmen National Museum

Tuskegee Airmen National Museum | Project on Civil Right and Historical Land Marks | Scoop.it
The Tuskegee Airmen were dedicated, determined young men who enlisted to become America's first black military airmen, at a time when there were many people who thought that black men lacked intelligence, skill, courage and patriotism.
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Viola Liuzzo Historic Marker - White Hall - Alabama.travel

Viola Liuzzo Historic Marker - White Hall - Alabama.travel | Project on Civil Right and Historical Land Marks | Scoop.it
Viola Gregg Liuzzo, a housewife and mother from Detroit, drove alone to Alabama to help with the Selma march after seeing televised reports of the attack at the Edmund Pettus Bridge.
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Civil Rights Division Home Page

Civil Rights Division Home Page | Project on Civil Right and Historical Land Marks | Scoop.it
The Civil Rights Division provides contact information, as well as detailed information on federally prohibited discrimination, its cases and other activities, and how to file a complaint.
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Rosa Parks Museum and Children's Wing - Montgomery - Alabama.travel

Rosa Parks Museum and Children's Wing - Montgomery - Alabama.travel | Project on Civil Right and Historical Land Marks | Scoop.it
A state-of-the-art museum depicting events that started the bus boycott and early Civil Rights movement. Provides an interactive, multi-media presentation, also an affiliate of Troy State University.
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Civil rights figure, first black probate judge William McKinley Branch dies in Alabama at 95

Civil rights figure, first black probate judge William McKinley Branch dies in Alabama at 95 | Project on Civil Right and Historical Land Marks | Scoop.it
The Rev. William McKinley Branch, an iconic figure in the 1960s-era civil rights movement in Alabama, has died. He was 95.
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