Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey
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Future of the Learning Space: Breaking Out of the Box (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu

Future of the Learning Space: Breaking Out of the Box (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu | Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey | Scoop.it
EDUCAUSE Review Online (What you need to know about School 2.0 classroom design http://t.co/JAIBbjPkol #edtech)

Via Anne Whisken
Stacey Jackowski's insight:

CLASSROOM CLIMATE PLAN

This article is geared more toward college classrooms, but can be applied to any classroom.  

Why should we continue to build ineffective learning environments?  We need to "break out of the box" of the traditional classroom environment.  This article had an interesting view of learning; the article introduces "the experience cone" of learning- all the retention modes of learning are at the top of the cone: reading, listening, watching movies..... these are all Passive learning behaviors.  An effective learning environment requires Active learning behaviors, such as simulating real life experiences and doing activities.  ACTIVE LEARNING BEHAVIORS SUPPORT PBL- STUDENTS ARE ENCOURAGED TO ASK QUESTIONS, DEVELOP ANSWERS, AND REFLECT ON WHAT THEY ARE LEARNING. 

I also really liked the list of characteristics given for our future classrooms-- the list covers technology availability, optimization for learning activities, emphasizes soft spaces versus hard/fixed spaces, and zoning classroom for sound and activity. THIS LIST PROMOTES WHOLE DEVELOPMENT BY ENCOURAGING AND PROVIDING AN ENGAGED, SUPPORTED, AND CHALLENGED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT.

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Creating Classroom Rules - Science NetLinks

Creating Classroom Rules - Science NetLinks | Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey | Scoop.it
In this lesson students will learn that different groups of people may have different rules by developing classroom rules.

Via Nicole Liebler
Stacey Jackowski's insight:

CLASSROOM CLIMATE PLAN

Routines, norms and rules should be a collaborative effort of the teacher and the students in order to ENCOURAGE RESILIENCE IN THE CLASSROOM- WHEN STUDENTS AND TEACHERS WORK TOGETHER THE PROCESS FOSTERS COMMUNICATION, PROBLEM SOLVING, RESPONSIBILITY, CREATIVITY, AND ADAPTABILITY AMONG THE CLASSROOM COMMUNITY.  We have discussed the importance of creating rules for each classroom on a yearly basis in many of my education classes.  This article really highlights great ways to do this with your students.  Using nursery rhymes, visuals such as crayon boxes and fun rule charts are effective ways to discuss why rules are needed and how to enforce rules not only in the classroom but also in life.  Asking students what rules they follow at home helps students learn about cultural influences and embraces diversity in the classroom THUS SUPPORTING GLOBAL COMPETENCE BY RECOGNIZING OTHER PERSPECTIVES.  I will definitely be using the crayon box idea in my classroom--what a great way for students to visualize the importance of each different color, but all together the colors make up a complete set of colors in a box of crayons ties into making rules that support and create a safe environment for everyone in the classroom.  CREATING A HEALTHY AND SAFE ENVIRONMENT IS ESSENTIAL TO SUPPORTING THE WHOLE DEVELOPMENT OF OUR STUDENTS.

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Nicole Liebler's curator insight, March 27, 2014 11:38 PM

CLASSROOM CLIMATE PLAN

 

In my future classroom, I will definitely utilize the opportunity for students to help construct the classroom rules. When students help to generate the rules, they take ownership of them, internalize them, and are more likely to follow them. This practice supports the whole child because students feel engaged, supported, safe, and proud. I agree with this article, that students should also participate in the construction of consequences, because students will deem them as fair and will hold themselves accountable. I like this article because it identifies the importance of discussing the different purposes of rules, the people who follow them, the ways rules differ in various places, and the people who construct rules. I agree that it is important for students to draw from their own personal lives and share rules that they follow outside of school, either in their homes or in the community. When students have the opportunity to share bits of their own lives, they feel more connected to the social community and feel that their voices are valued. When students help to establish rules, PBL features are emphasized because they are hearing others' perspectives, collaborating with peers to construct a consolidated list, and problem solving to handle disagreement among different viewpoints. I think students will feel like stronger members of their classroom communities if the sense of insubordination (from the teacher independently generating and assigning the rules) is reduced or eliminated. 

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Watch it Wednesday: Using and Creating Routines to Promote Interactions

Watch it Wednesday: Using and Creating Routines to Promote Interactions | Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey | Scoop.it
Watch some ways to use classroom routines to build in opportunities for interaction. http://youtu.be/Vl7q_cxjLSg

Via PrAACtical AAC, Lauren Portalea
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CLASSROOM CLIMATE PLAN

This video clip shows an easy and effective way to include shy students in everyday classroom routines.  It is important to include all students in classroom routines.  This video suggests making individual student routines such as book returns, passing out papers, and conducting classroom surveys into partner activities.  Partner activities support the WHOLE DEVELOPMENT AND RESILIENCE OF STUDENTS BY CREATING A SAFE AND ENGAGED ATMOSPHERE THROUGH COMMUNICATION AND RESPONSIBILITY.   

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Lauren Portalea's curator insight, March 26, 2014 9:45 PM

One of Robin Parker's main goals in the classroom is to increase social interaction between students. She discusses simple classroom routines that can address her goal.  For example, many elementary school classrooms give students classroom jobs. Parker's modification is to give several students the same classroom job to encourage children to work together. This modification will not create a drastic change to classroom routines, but offers another opportunity for students to work together. This idea works perfectly with the ideas of Project Based Learning. PBL classrooms focus on learning through projects to become global citizens. When students work together they build the ability to create functional relationships.

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Motivation, Engagement, and Student Voice | Students at the Center

Motivation, Engagement, and Student Voice | Students at the Center | Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey | Scoop.it
Worth reading: Motivation, Engagement, and Student Voice | Students at the Center http://t.co/1txdWKMoLK #StuVoice

Via Joe Marlin
Stacey Jackowski's insight:

CLASSROOM CLIMATE PLAN

In the age of standardized testing and focus on test scores, it seems that educators have lost their focus; we need to go back to putting students in the center of learning, not test scores. SUPPORTING RESILIENCE AND WHOLE CHILD THINKING INCLUDE creating classrooms that motivate, engage, and value each students voice creates learners that Will do well on tests.  When students have a voice in their own learning experience they will become better learners, THIS SUPPORTS ALL OF THE TENETS OF PROJECT BASED LEARNING.  We as educators need to take a step back from always focusing on testing and scores and really focus on what our students need in the classroom to foster an engaging and motivating classroom environment. 

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Teaching Strategies | Facing History and Ourselves

We encourage teachers to use student-centered teaching strategies that nurture students' literacy and critical thinking skills within a respectful classroom climate. The strategies suggested here can be used with students of all ages with any academic content.


Via rmom352
Stacey Jackowski's insight:

CLASSROOM CLIMATE PLAN

I will definitely utilize this website for student centered teaching strategies in my future classroom! A plethora of ideas and links---cafe conversations, four corners, exit cards, graffiti boards, identity charts, word walls and more! Each link has a detailed description of the strategy activity and helps you as the teacher cater each activity to the specific set of students that you will be using it with.    USING STUDENT CENTERED TEACHING STRATEGIES FOCUSES ON PROMOTING RESILIENCE AMONG STUDENTS-- BOOSTING SELF ESTEEM,  ENCOURAGING CREATIVITY, COMMUNICATION AND INITIATIVE.  ALSO THESE STRATEGIES AND ACTIVITIES PROMOTE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS AND CHOICE, WHICH CAN THEN BE USED IN PROJECT BASED LEARNING ACTIVITIES.

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Priscilla Der's curator insight, April 6, 2014 10:09 PM

7 pages containing different teaching strategies to use in the classroom. Some strategies include: Chunking is one to help students with challenging texts of any length, KWL which assesses what we know/what we still want to learn,  and Wraparound which is used for students in a classroom to share their ideas about a question or text and can be provocative discussion starters. I think these would be good strategies to use/test out in my own classroom with different topics/subject matter. 

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Common Core & Ed Tech: What’s the Point? Using Essential Questions in the Classroom

Common Core & Ed Tech: What’s the Point? Using Essential Questions in the Classroom | Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey | Scoop.it
Stacey Jackowski's insight:
As we have been discussing the meaning and importance of essential questions, I have found that coming up with these questions can be difficult. This article gives focus on how to write and use essential questions. These questions should excite and provoke thought about a topic before the lesson is even started.
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How to Write Effective Driving Questions for Project-Based Learning

How to Write Effective Driving Questions for Project-Based Learning | Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey | Scoop.it
Andrew Miller is a consultant for the Buck Institute for Education, an organization that specializes in project-based curriculum.

Via Sheryl Woods
Stacey Jackowski's insight:

Coming up with an idea can be very difficult.  Coming up with a driving question to lead a project can be even more difficult.  Sometimes the things that seem the easiest, are the most difficult.  This article was very helpful in how to develop driving questions. I loved the concept of a "tubric" (you will have to watch the video) as a tool to perfect and fine tune driving questions. 

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The Difference Between Projects And Project-Based Learning

The Difference Between Projects And Project-Based Learning | Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey | Scoop.it
The Difference Between Projects And Project-Based Learning

Via Greg Alchin, Yenoch Ng
Stacey Jackowski's insight:

Making a poster is not project based learning.  Choosing an engaging and thought provoking topic, relating it to the real world, using creativity.........now that sounds more like it.  I remember every year in elementary school picking a topic of interest and completing a science fair project.  I also remember the engaging process of completing the project, displaying and explaining my project to my peers and teacher, and even winning a couple ribbons in the science fair.  While this is not exactly what Project Based Learning is, it is similar and I have fond memories of learning that way.  I am excited to learn more about what exactly Project Learning is and how to design and implement projects with my future students.

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Greg Alchin's curator insight, November 4, 2013 5:25 AM

"They have clarified the difference between projects and project-based learning before. Projects are about the product, while project-based learning is about the process.

Yenoch Ng's curator insight, February 13, 2014 1:27 PM

This article provides helpful guidelines that describe how projects are different from project-based learning, since it is easy for me to confuse the two. It helped me realized that projects are not based on the real world tasks, but students dive into real world tasks and issues. Additionally, these guidelines will help me form project-based learning ideas for my future students.

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ECRP. Vol 1 No 1. From Themes to Projects

ECRP. Vol 1 No 1. From Themes to Projects | Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey | Scoop.it
In depth explanation of Sylvia Chard's project approach in #elementary #classrooms. All #schools should do this! http://t.co/4GtNEBrrw6
Stacey Jackowski's insight:

Click on the link above! The importance of children having input in the topics and themes of project based learning is essential.  The theme in this paper is shoes, and at first I thought to myself : What kind of essential questions can stem from the theme of shoes?  I was very interested to find out the numerous questions posed by several different elementary classes, that led to thought provoking conversation about shoes.  Student, teacher, and other outside guidance, all need to work together to collaborate during #PBL. 

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Danielle Howard's comment, February 20, 2014 6:58 PM
I love how a simple concept, like shoes, can lead to so many different projects. As an educator, I think I will be able to learn about/from my kids just by seeing what else they think of when they hear the word "shoes".
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Classroom Layouts: Seating Arrangements for Effective Learning ...

Classroom Layouts: Seating Arrangements for Effective Learning ... | Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey | Scoop.it
It is important for an instructor to establish a classroom structure from the very first session and adapt accordingly to facilitate lectures, promote discussions, encourage group activities, or solve any behavioral problems.

Via Rachel McGrath
Stacey Jackowski's insight:

CLASSROOM CLIMATE PLAN

No perfect classroom arrangement exists for all situations for sure.....but this article has a lot of great tips and information on easy and different arrangements for the classroom.  Each arrangement has different purposes, advantages and disadvantages.  I think it is important as a teacher to know how and when to reformat your classroom to accommodate students learning and to serve a specific purpose.  I liked that most of the arrangements in this article SUPPORTED A PBL ENVIRONMENT BY PROMOTING unity, high group involvement, and a sense of equality among the group.

ALSO,  CREATING A CLASSROOM SPACE THAT CAN BE FLEXIBLE, ORGANIZED, AND ADAPTABLE WILL SUPPORT RESILIENCE IN THE CLASS BECAUSE STUDENTS WILL LEARN HOW DIFFERENT CLASSROOM ARRANGEMENTS FUNCTION FOR DIFFERENT LEARNING EXPERIENCES.

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Rachel McGrath's curator insight, March 12, 2014 10:51 PM

I really like this site because it is an overview of three common classroom seat layouts that are used. The site talks about the advantages and disadvantages, whether collaboration is possible, and what is the focus. This is a really beneficial overview because when I am in my future classroom and trying to set up the chairs I can look at this website and decide what I want the atmospher to be like and go from there.

Ashlee David's curator insight, March 13, 2014 10:07 AM

This article really helps a teacher plan out the desk layout. For the most part I want my students' desk arranged in groups of 4 or 5. I believe students should be exposed to global competency and PBL. Having the students' desk group allows them to work together to solve common problems. But this article has made me realize that for some activities and lessons grouping the desk my not be the best choice. When I am doing a whole class discussion or lesson the u-shaped layout feels more effective. I even saw some layouts of the more traditional classroom that could work. If I wanted groups of only 3 I can put the desk in rows but have them in sets of 3. Also with more desk layout ideas I can give my students more options of how they want to do group work and how they want to sit. I want my students to have choices in their education. This article provides areal views of the seating arrangements to help visualize how you would want your desk in your own classroom.     

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Learning to learn in the Primary classroom : Primary - Macmillan ELT

Learning to learn in the Primary classroom : Primary - Macmillan ELT | Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey | Scoop.it

By systematically drawing our pupils' attention to study skills and everyday learning habits as part of regular classroom routines, we will be helping to build confidence and self-awareness, not only applicable to language learning but also across the whole curriculum. 


Via Director Of Young Learners
Stacey Jackowski's insight:

CLASSROOM CLIMATE PLAN

The saying "learning to learn" has popped up in many of discussions in class; so simple and so necessary.  This article has some fantastic ideas to facilitate learning to learn.  Children are visual learners and love to be engaged to think and be be creative.  I will use a lot the ideas in this article in my classroom.  Starting the routine of writing lists and activities on the board each day and then allowing the students to cross off activities when completed is a great way to involve students in the learning process; also when students cross something off the list you can ask them to reflect on the activity to reinforce what they learned. CONSISTENT DAILY ACTIVITIES PROMOTE WHOLE CHILD DEVELOPMENT BY KEEPING STUDENTS ACTIVELY ENGAGED AND CHALLENGED EVERY DAY.

The "mind maps", "I can flowers", and remembering/recycling strategies in this article are all great ideas for the classroom. THE "I CAN FLOWERS" ARE A GREAT WAY TO ENCOURAGE CREATIVE AND COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT, THUS SUPPORTING RESILIENCE IN EVERY STUDENT. THE REMEMBERING/RECYCLING STRATEGY COULD EASILY BE TURNED INTO A PROJECT BASED LEARNING ACTIVITY THAT ALSO TIES INTO GLOBAL COMPETENCE---STUDENTS COULD GET INVOLVED IN A SCHOOL SUPPORTED RECYCLING PROGRAM AND COME UP WITH WAYS TO INCREASE RECYCLING-THUS PROMOTING VOICE AND CHOICE AND COMMUNICATING IDEAS.

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POSTER: 7 Easy Icebreakers You Can Do With Post-It Notes

POSTER: 7 Easy Icebreakers You Can Do With Post-It Notes | Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey | Scoop.it
We all love post-it notes, don't we?! Did you know that there are tons of activities you can do with them in your classroom? Well, check out 7 such activities below: we have created this HI-

Via Emma Herrod
Stacey Jackowski's insight:

CLASSROOM CLIMATE PLAN

Similar to the icebreaker activities that we do in EDCI, this list of fun and engaging icebreakers using post it notes encourages students to get to know one another aside from doing school work together.  These kind of getting to know each other activities SUPPORT WHOLE CHILD THINKING AND are very important to create a SAFE comfortable classroom environment. The activities spark conversations among students and the teacher that might not occur otherwise FACILITATING GLOBAL COMPETENCE WHEN STUDENTS ARE  RECOGNIZING OTHER PERSPECTIVES AND COMMUNICATING IDEAS.  

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Emma Herrod's curator insight, June 29, 2013 1:11 PM

A very nice and easy-to-read set of warmers or icebreakers using Post-It Notes. Some of these would be perfect for that last minute class you have to cover for a colleague. 

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An Essential Question for Developing Student-Centered Classrooms

An Essential Question for Developing Student-Centered Classrooms | Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey | Scoop.it
Many classrooms could benefit by making students more responsible for things that teachers are accustomed to doing for them, principal Tom Bonnell says.

Via Grant Montgomery, Poornima Menon
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CLASSROOM CLIMATE PLAN

"What are you doing in your classroom now that you could turn over to your students to do?"

Many teachers do a lot of daily tasks on the classroom that could really be given to students to do.  Assigning daily tasks to students helps create a strong sense of community in the classroom SUPPORTING WHOLE CHILD THINKING AND RESILIENCE.  WHEN everyone has a role in the classroom community STUDENTS ARE ENGAGED, CREATIVE, COMMUNICATE IDEAS, AND ARE SUPPORTED.  Establishing these daily roles also help free up time for the teacher to give more attention to her students daily needs.  I remember in elementary school having different responsibilities in the classroom, such as passing out papers, filing, cleaning up.... and I think it also helped me with learning about responsibilities, both on an individual and group level.  I ALSO THINK THAT STUDENTS WILL BEGIN TO SEE ALL OF THE WORK THAT A TEACHER DOES ASIDE FROM TEACHING THE CLASS AND WILL THEN BE ABLE TO RECOGNIZE AND HOPEFULLY APPRECIATE ANOTHER PERSPECTIVE  OF THE CLASSROOM. 

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Differentiated Instruction In The Classroom – How Why What and Where

Differentiated Instruction In The Classroom – How Why What and Where | Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey | Scoop.it
 Characteristics in successful learning environment:

-          Positive Classroom climate.

-          Peers should acknowledge each other as all having special talents tha...

Via Ginger Lewman
Stacey Jackowski's insight:

CLASSROOM CLIMATE PLAN

This article has a nice list of characteristics that promotes positive norms and routines in the classroom.  Everyone has different talents--lets embrace and acknowledge each others strengths and deficits---this is a very important lesson to teach in school and in life AND IN DOING EMBRACING WHOLE CHILD THINKING AND RESILIENCE BECAUSE STUDENTS SELF ESTEEM WILL BE NURTURED, THEY WILL FEEL SAFE AND SUPPORTED, AND WILL LEARN TO BE EMPATHETIC TOWARDS OTHERS. When students are comfortable with their own and their peers strengths and weaknesses, they will then be more comfortable asking questions and participating in class.  Another important part of establishing classroom norms is making sure that you the teacher are modeling positive and wanted behavior, otherwise you cannot expect your students to do the same. 

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Global Competency Isn't Just a Buzz Word

Global Competency Isn't Just a Buzz Word | Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey | Scoop.it
Dana Mortenson, founder of World Savvy, discusses the skills children will need to thrive in a fast-changing world.

Via Bob Manning
Stacey Jackowski's insight:

 

This image from the founder of World Savvy quickly drew my attention.  I, like many other individuals, am a visual learner.  In #EDCI397 we were asked to think of a "logo" that encompassed Global Competency, Resilience and Whole Development and we came up with some great ideas.  I think this image is also a great representation of these three important topics.   

 

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Learners Should Be Developing Their Own Essential Questions

Learners Should Be Developing Their Own Essential Questions | Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself" J.Dewey | Scoop.it

"Having essential questions drive curriculum and learning has become core to many educators' instructional practices.  Grant Wiggins, in his work on Understanding By Design, describes an essential quetion as:  

A meaning of “essential” involves important questions that recur throughout one’s life. Such questions are broad in scope and timeless by nature. They are perpetually arguable – What is justice?  Is art a matter of taste or principles? How far should we tamper with our own biology and chemistry?  Is science compatible with religion? Is an author’s view privileged in determining the meaning of a text? We may arrive at or be helped to grasp understandings for these questions, but we soon learn that answers to them are invariably provisional..."


Via Beth Dichter, kathymcdonough, Tibshirani
Stacey Jackowski's insight:

This quote is so true.  Learning how to ask essential questions is a skill that we can carry with us for the rest of our lives and facilitates a lifetime of learning. 

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Begoña Iturgaitz's curator insight, September 29, 2013 5:45 PM

Still thinking about a MUST at any classroom?

Patrice Bucci's curator insight, September 29, 2013 7:00 PM

So true... I cringe when I am in classrooms with the packaged program "essential question" of the week on the board...and very often those "essential questions" lack cognitive clarity for the students

Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, January 8, 2014 1:33 PM

A great summary of why questioning still matters.  We've been talking about metacognition a lot this year in the library.  Learning how to develop questions is a large part of learning how you learn and think.

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Highlights from PBL World 2013

The 2nd annual PBL World brought together over 500 educators who understand that Project Based Learning is a key strategy for creating an effective and engag...
Stacey Jackowski's insight:

Wow! What a great resource for educators. I think seminars like this are what we need in order to really grow and improve in the area of PBL.  When we as educators can "experience and live the projects" in these kind of seminars, it can inspire and spark even more innovative ideas for our classrooms.  A seminar like this could be scaled down to just include teachers in one particular school and would be just as effective.

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Rachel McGrath's comment, February 19, 2014 11:19 PM
I think your insight is spot on, it is important to collaborate all together. I feel like some of the best ideas come from a room where all of these brains that are invested and motivated come together and end up with this awesome product.