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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | Education | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"

 

"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.

 

Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."

 

This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.

 

And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"

 

What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)

 

 

Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10

 

Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/

 

(Image credit: Behance.net)

 

 


Via Robin Good, João Greno Brogueira, Amanda McAndrew, Official AndreasCY, LaiaJoana, Rui Guimarães Lima, Ramon Aragon, Paulo Simões, Dennis T OConnor, Pam Colburn Harland, Sue Kowalski
Priscilla Der's insight:

This article is a reminder that as we are curating content as teachers so are students. Rather then memorizing or reciting textbook facts, students should be able to steer and set their own learning goals (this is where PBL) comes into mind. 

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Audrey's curator insight, August 13, 2013 5:01 PM

Brilliant.  This is an example of what is known as "flipping" where the student is directed to where information can be found, e.g. Youtube, websites, powerpoint, etc and set critical evaluative questions.

 

Home School Learning is an ideal example of students as curators of their learning. It is essential for children to learn to be in charge of their learning from pre-school in order to develop essential evaluative and critical analytical skills. audrey@homeschoolsource.co.uk.

 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 13, 2013 7:43 PM

I had a similar conversation yesterday and as I prepare my lit review this thinking has emerged. It is less about content and more about skills, attitudes, habits, practices, etc. in learning.

Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

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Six Scaffolding Strategies to Use with Your Students

Six Scaffolding Strategies to Use with Your Students | Education | Scoop.it
What’s the opposite of scaffolding a lesson? It would be saying to students something like, “Read this nine-page science article, write a detailed essay on the topic it explores, and turn it in by Wed
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Ideas for Classroom Seating Arrangements -

Ideas for Classroom Seating Arrangements - | Education | Scoop.it
What’s Here Need ideas for seating arrangements in your classroom? On this page, you’ll find tips on arranging student desks in four different formations, complete with photos from My Classroom Tours. You can click on most of the pictures to view the complete tour for that particular room. Whether you’re looking for a classroom seating …
Priscilla Der's insight:

This blog has tons of desk arrangement and seating plans done by a teacher who is now an educational consultant. Pros and cons of all of the arrangements including a stadium seating/angled rows with touching desks which I have yet to see before. Interesting. I think I will definitely experiment with these floor seating plans when I am in my own classroom to see which is most effective.

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7 Ways Teaching Has Changed

7 Ways Teaching Has Changed | Education | Scoop.it
This Is The World Teachers Must Adapt To: 7 Ways Teaching Has Changed by Terry Heick Teachers are the arbitrators of knowledge and culture. Knowledge…

 

7. A culture that can seem, well, distracted

 

And if we’re going to talk about the world teachers must adapt to, the idea of distraction has to be at least mentioned.

.

 

I’m not sure any of us fully understand the complexities of modern connectivity, information access, and the subjective idea of “distraction.” (After all, if five people are all at a table at Starbucks with their faces stuck to their phones, who’s to say their physical company rather than the respective apps that their own aren’t doing the distracting?)

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That said, things are certainly different than the BS era of yesteryear (that is, before smartphones). At any moment someone can bust out a digital screen and start smearing their fingers across it. And no one knows what they’re doing and so we assume the worst and say the world is going down in flames.

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And it very well could be. This is all new, so we don’t know. This is an era full of possibility, uncertainty, excitement, loss, and change.

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This is the world teachers must adapt to.

 

 


Via Gust MEES
Priscilla Der's insight:

This article relates back to Global Competency as teachers must stay current with societal changes and shifts. Relating to students and engaging students require teachers to stay current and in the know vs. sticking to traditional routes/techniques in which we were taught with. We must continuously adjust our teaching to fit the 21st century needs and keep re-adjusting to align these needs to the Common Core curriculum. 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 27, 1:58 PM


This is the world teachers must adapt to.


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Learning from Our Teaching Mistakes

Learning from Our Teaching Mistakes | Education | Scoop.it
We regularly tell our students “Don’t be afraid to make mistakes. You can learn from your mistakes.” Most of us work hard to create classroom climates where it’s okay to make mistakes.

Via Blaine Morrow
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More can be learned from our mistakes then from our triumphs. Mistakes open everyone to learning. Teaching is probably going to be full of mistakes my first year and reading this article helps to alleviate stress and anxiety I have from just imaging it all. While teaching our students to not be afraid to make mistakes and learn from them we should also do the same for ourselves. Re-evaluate our techniques and re-imagine/tweak them so they can be effective the next time they are implemented. Teaching is all but a trial-and-error process!

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The 21st century is challenging old notions of learning spaces

The 21st century is challenging old notions of learning spaces | Education | Scoop.it

Technology and collaborative work environments are changing the design of learning spaces.  The idea that students must be seated at desks working in rows is quickly becoming archaic. Technology and collaborative work environments are changing the design of learning spaces. Experts hope that the emerging paradigm will translate into improved learning spaces and influence future architectural design. Stephen Heppell and expert panelists recently spoke in Australia about physical spaces in The changing face of Education. Heppell, an international expert in the fields of learning, new media and technology, is known for his “eyes on the horizon, feet on the ground philosophy”. He has moved countless organizations into the digital age. One such project, Ingenium, created a learning space that adapted to the needs of different types of learners.  Kinaesthetic learners who might not benefit from traditional classrooms, for example, had ample space that allowed movement. The 21st century is challenging old notions of learning spaces…


Via Elizabeth E Charles, L2_S2S, Sue Kowalski
Priscilla Der's insight:

Classrooms should be spaces students do not want to leave. This article goes through the notions of embracing change to meet the needs of Generation Y. As some communities are hesitant to make the change from the traditional classroom spaces the article makes suggestions (variety of different furniture, comfy spaces, mood lighting, encourage community involvement-classroom is inviting for adults as well as students) that will encourage student engagement in the 21st century. 

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Eleni Zazani's comment, November 11, 2013 6:15 AM
Very thoughtful piece, thank you!
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5 Easy Ways To Reduce Student Stress In The Classroom - TeachThought

5 Easy Ways To Reduce Student Stress In The Classroom - TeachThought | Education | Scoop.it

"As educators we need to not only be cognizant of how our behaviour and expectations are affecting our students, increasingly we need to work to counteract the effects of outside stresses which may hinder success in the classroom. Of course we have no way of discerning the emotional state (and thus the readiness to learn) of each of the students in front of us. But with ever increasing numbers of kids who have difficulty self-regulating most teachers can bet on the fact that some (or many) of the students in front of them on any given day are in either a hyper-aroused or hypo-aroused emotional state. Here are 5 simple things that teachers can do to help students self regulate."

 


Via John Evans
Priscilla Der's insight:

Great tips on how to understand a student's perspective and to modify classroom climate and environment to meet these needs. De-clutter, building transitions between lessons, and allowing for movement/fidgeting are some key takeaways. 

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Want Better Project-Based Learning? Use Social and Emotional Learning

Want Better Project-Based Learning? Use Social and Emotional Learning | Education | Scoop.it
Today's guest blogger is Thom Markham, a psychologist, educator, and president of Global Redesigns, an international consulting organization focused on project-based learning, social-emotional learnin
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Three factors to consider... Caring relationships, the desire for meaning and the power of mastery. Caring relationships - refer to working with different individuals as a group with respect to recognizing and respecting that individual. The desire for meaning - setting goals which are relevant to the person's needs/desires. The power of mastery - achievement is the state of well being as people feel an intrinsic reward that perpetuates further achievement.

Positive experiences are built upon other positive experiences. Before starting a PBL, first establish a culture of inquiry, excellence and personal responsibility. 

 

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Classroom Architect

Priscilla Der's insight:

This is an online tool to help create a floor plan for your classroom that will help support PBL and learning goals. I find this tool to be helpful for teachers who want to have multiple classroom arrangements to fit their learning goals such as PBL, assessment-taking, and other learning goals. This tool allows teachers the ability to create classroom floor plans that are supportive to these goals.

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Key Factors in Creating a Positive Classroom Climate > Committee for Children

Key Factors in Creating a Positive Classroom Climate > Committee for Children | Education | Scoop.it
Priscilla Der's insight:

This article dissects three key factors in creating a positive classroom climate. The first factor is to develop and reinforce classroom rules and norms which gives students clear boundaries and opportunities to practice self-regulation and make good choices. The second is to promote positive peer relationships in the classroom and the article offers suggestions to do this through class meetings where topics are open to discussion with the entire class and planning relationship building games designed to help students get to know each other better. Lastly, nurture positive relationship with all students by greeting students by name every time they walk in the door, use warm inclusive behaviors reinforcing positive behaviors with positive words and asking students personal questions that help get to know them and what's happening in their lives.

 

The article also suggests checking in and asking students on how they feel about their classroom and making the necessary adjustments based on student feedback. I will definitely use this in my own classroom to adjust the environment to meet my student needs and promote a positive classroom environment. 

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Creating a Positive Classroom Environment

Looks at the benefits of creating a positive classroom environment and strategies to achieve this.
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The physical space is the groundwork for the type of classroom you want to run. --desk arrangements and student placement are vital to student and teacher success. 


I found the desk arrangements to be most helpful as it explained the significance of each arrangement: 

Desk in groups facing each other - Help stimulate student discussion

Desks in single or double rows - Good for demonstrations and independent work

Desks in U-shape - Are recommended

Desks in workshops - Suited for students who have developed management skills


Student placement should place students in areas of the classroom best suited to their needs (distracted students up front or away from windows, doorways, or high-traffic areas). 

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The Role of PBL in Making the Shift to Common Core

The Role of PBL in Making the Shift to Common Core | Education | Scoop.it
Editor's note: John Larmer, Editor in Chief at the Buck Institute for Education (BIE), contributed to this post.

The Common Core has embedded within it some Big Ideas that shift the role of teachers
Priscilla Der's insight:

Here Project Based Learning is compared to Common Core initiatives  and they both closely relate to one another! The blog provides different ways to integrate PBL into Common Core which is a tremendous sigh of relief to most pre-teacher candidates looking to join the classroom soon with all the reforms amongst us these days.

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What is Global Competence? | Global Teacher Education

What is Global Competence? | Global Teacher Education | Education | Scoop.it
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Global Competency starts with training teachers for the global age. This graphic organizer allows for better comprehension of how Global Competency can be implemented in the classroom especially for pre-teacher candidates as the information out there is sometimes overwhelming. This chart specifically outlines different aspects pertaining to the four modes: Investigate the World, Recognize Perspectives, Communicate Ideas, and Take Action.

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Tweet from @seamus82414

Tweet from @seamus82414 | Education | Scoop.it
An interesting infographic. Maybe social reform and economic reform need to happen before education reform... pic.twitter.com/Tx1klLubEW
Priscilla Der's insight:

This picture is related to the Common Core State Standards. "We cannot treat these schools(disadvantaged) in the same way that we would schools in more advantaged neighborhoods or we will continue to get the same results." After viewing this among all the education reforms we have currently in action it calls for social and economic reform as well. Standardizing curriculum as in the Common Core, does that really equate to equality in schools? 

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EDCI397: Classroom Climate Plan on Pinterest

EDCI397: Classroom Climate Plan on Pinterest | Education | Scoop.it
See what Priscilla Der (derpriscilla) has discovered on Pinterest, the world's biggest collection of everybody's favorite things.
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Some visuals to help promote a positive classroom environment. I find Pinterest to be an extraordinary resource for finding visual material/content for curating. 

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Teaching Ashley: My Prezi on creating a positive classroom environment!

Teaching Ashley: My Prezi on creating a positive classroom environment! | Education | Scoop.it
Priscilla Der's insight:

This is a blog created by a pre-teacher candidate on her journey of becoming an elementary education teacher. I found her Prezi to be extremely helpful as it address multiple issues that promote a positive classroom environment that of student-teacher relations, the social and emotional well-being, and bullying.

 

Helpful suggestions include:

Being consistent -- with praise and while enforcing rules/punishments. Maintain emotional objectivity in the classroom as students draw from your actions. Reframe student's behaviors in your mind and analyze why they might be acting that way (in your classroom and beyond). Cooperation and concern means getting to know your students! Show affection by greeting students and showing you care. Incorporate student interests in the lessons. Be mindful of your own physical actions as students draw from them. Open discussions about bullying in the classroom (including talk about circumstances/situations that may happen) and to generate rules together as a class. 

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Teaching Strategies | Facing History and Ourselves

We encourage teachers to use student-centered teaching strategies that nurture students' literacy and critical thinking skills within a respectful classroom climate. The strategies suggested here can be used with students of all ages with any academic content.


Via rmom352
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7 pages containing different teaching strategies to use in the classroom. Some strategies include: Chunking is one to help students with challenging texts of any length, KWL which assesses what we know/what we still want to learn,  and Wraparound which is used for students in a classroom to share their ideas about a question or text and can be provocative discussion starters. I think these would be good strategies to use/test out in my own classroom with different topics/subject matter. 

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Stacey Jackowski's curator insight, April 6, 7:12 PM

CLASSROOM CLIMATE PLAN

I will definitely utilize this website for student centered teaching strategies in my future classroom! A plethora of ideas and links---cafe conversations, four corners, exit cards, graffiti boards, identity charts, word walls and more! Each link has a detailed description of the strategy activity and helps you as the teacher cater each activity to the specific set of students that you will be using it with.    USING STUDENT CENTERED TEACHING STRATEGIES FOCUSES ON PROMOTING RESILIENCE AMONG STUDENTS-- BOOSTING SELF ESTEEM,  ENCOURAGING CREATIVITY, COMMUNICATION AND INITIATIVE.  ALSO THESE STRATEGIES AND ACTIVITIES PROMOTE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS AND CHOICE, WHICH CAN THEN BE USED IN PROJECT BASED LEARNING ACTIVITIES.

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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | Education | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"

 

"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.

 

Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."

 

This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.

 

And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"

 

What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)

 

 

Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10

 

Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/

 

(Image credit: Behance.net)

 

 


Via Robin Good, João Greno Brogueira, Amanda McAndrew, Official AndreasCY, LaiaJoana, Rui Guimarães Lima, Ramon Aragon, Paulo Simões, Dennis T OConnor, Pam Colburn Harland, Sue Kowalski
Priscilla Der's insight:

This article is a reminder that as we are curating content as teachers so are students. Rather then memorizing or reciting textbook facts, students should be able to steer and set their own learning goals (this is where PBL) comes into mind. 

more...
Audrey's curator insight, August 13, 2013 5:01 PM

Brilliant.  This is an example of what is known as "flipping" where the student is directed to where information can be found, e.g. Youtube, websites, powerpoint, etc and set critical evaluative questions.

 

Home School Learning is an ideal example of students as curators of their learning. It is essential for children to learn to be in charge of their learning from pre-school in order to develop essential evaluative and critical analytical skills. audrey@homeschoolsource.co.uk.

 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 13, 2013 7:43 PM

I had a similar conversation yesterday and as I prepare my lit review this thinking has emerged. It is less about content and more about skills, attitudes, habits, practices, etc. in learning.

Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

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11 Essential Tools For Better Project-Based Learning

11 Essential Tools For Better Project-Based Learning | Education | Scoop.it
11 Essential Tools For Better Project-Based Learning
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Some helpful tools to help PBL in the classroom. Mindmeister for mapping out ideas sounds like a good tool to use for brainstorming process. Presentation tools like Myhistro and Pixton for creative storytelling sounds promising as well.

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Focus on Social, Emotional Skills in Classroom Tied to Academic Gains

Focus on Social, Emotional Skills in Classroom Tied to Academic Gains | Education | Scoop.it
Classroom programs designed to improve elementary school students’ social and emotional skills can also increase reading and math achievement, according to a n

Via Mel Riddile
Priscilla Der's insight:

I remember learning that emotional intelligence and good emotional management skills was a better predictor of student achievement and success later in life according to research. Good social and emotional management skills taught leads to healthy individuals who can in turn thrive in the classroom. The research done here is called "Responsive Classroom" which is a widely used emotional learning program. The success of RC is evident in schools that have administration that supports RC and in turn teachers were supported in implementation, thoughtful school leadership is important to success. A supportive team and principal is the key to success for all students and teachers to thrive in the classroom.

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Cinzia Bruno's curator insight, March 9, 4:29 PM

I found it interesting that this article divulges that a study found that improving students' social and emotional skills can help increase achievement in mathematics and reading skills for students with various socioeconomic backgrounds. The article discusses an approach called Responsive Classroom that targets social and emotional learning. I found this approach very beneficial in that as teachers create learning environments that are well managed and caring, in addition to developing relationships within the classroom while also supporting student self-control, teachers will positively affect student achievement. As a future teacher, one of my priorities will be to establish a classroom environment that is safe, positive and engaging, and aim to form meaningful connections/relationships with my students.  I will focus on integrating social and emotional skills within the academic curriculum. 

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How to Make Your Classroom a Thinking Space

How to Make Your Classroom a Thinking Space | Education | Scoop.it
Editor's note: The following is an excerpt from Thinking Through Project-Based Learning: Guiding Deeper Inquiry by Jane Krauss and Suzie Boss. It was published this month by Corwin.
Take a moment an
Priscilla Der's insight:

Suggestions and advice to make modifications in the classroom to fit PBL. A few good suggestions include: Whiteboard paint, students can write on their desks or the floor with dry-erase markers, and providing them with mini-whiteboards (cut from melamine shower board )to use while tackling problems that may require multiple attempts to solve.

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4 Keys To Designing A Project-Based Learning Classroom -

4 Keys To Designing A Project-Based Learning Classroom - | Education | Scoop.it
What are the keys designing a project-based learning classroom? It starts with the teacher.
Priscilla Der's insight:

Some important life lessons that start in the classroom and extend success later in life are: how to creatively solve problems, stay focused, work as part of a team, and organize their thoughts in a way others will understand. PBL is the answer to helping students develop these skills. 4 things teachers need to keep in mind: (1) Learning spaces set the tone; (2) Think information access; (3) Use technology for purpose;  and (4) See yourself as the ultimate resource. 

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Building a Positive, Trusting Classroom Environment | Edutopia

Building a Positive, Trusting Classroom Environment | Edutopia | Education | Scoop.it
Teacher and blogger Jose Vilson shares three suggestions for building a positive, trusting classroom environment.

Via Jon Samuelson
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Refrain from using the word "wrong" - Start the year off by accepting their errors and misgivings as you learn their style of learning. Remember that everyone makes mistakes and this in turn encourages resiliency for students and teachers. I can only imagine my first year teaching to be made with lots of mistakes, but these are all opportunities to learn and better myself the next time I teach. Take arguments outside - Teachers have nothing to gain and everything to lose when going back and forth on an argument with a student in class. This was helpful advice as I imagine there will be situations like this in every classroom. Management techniques/advice is greatly appreciated! Reading your students - What type of affirmation works for them and when it is appropriate. I have definitely had very different classroom experiences and sometimes felt the need to compliment each student, but this can lead to students who constantly need  affirmation and they will never build self-sufficiency this way. Be supportive, but not overly coddling. 

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The Elements Of A Literacy-Rich Classroom Environment

The Elements Of A Literacy-Rich Classroom Environment | Education | Scoop.it
The Elements Of A Literacy-Rich Classroom Environment
Priscilla Der's insight:

These suggestions advocate elements that promote a literacy rich classroom environment which is important for all types of learners --from english language learners to native english speaking learners. Literacy rich environments have  word walls, student work, content posters and a classroom library which promote speaking, listening, reading, and writing in a variety of authentic ways. Walking into different classrooms I first notice what is on the walls around me and if it is engaging or not. The most memorable classrooms have been the ones which are visually engaging and interesting. I would like to think... "If I'm not interested, how will my kids be?". I recently went to a school for a read aloud event and I noticed the difference in classrooms and how attractive walls capture my attention and keep me interested over bare classroom walls where teachers do not exert the extra effort. 

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Teaching resilience: Reflection - @kdwashburn

Teaching resilience: Reflection - @kdwashburn | Education | Scoop.it
“I’m so stupid. I’ll never get this!” The message looped inside Kent’s mind, its echoes blinding him to any way forward. When his teacher came by, she assu
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"One teacher, taking the time and interest to dig for the source of a problem, can make a significant difference". Resiliency is being self-aware. Guiding students through the process of self-awareness and redirecting their mental energies creates a powerful learning opportunity. As we talked about in class, resilience is a desirable trait not only in the classroom, but for life. This article gives good pointers as how to approach different situations in the classroom in order to engage your students and make connections with them in terms of a teacher-student relationship.

 

Ask anyone if they have ever had a horrible or bad day at school and somehow they get through it and are better for it later. Encouraging students to be conscious of themselves and to redirect these negative thoughts/feelings to something positive is essential for creating resilient 21st century students. There's been many times where I might doubt myself or create unnecessary anxiety when in school and somehow become able to work it all out with the encouragement of my teacher and peers. 

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Common Core Standards: Is This A One-Size Fits All Type Of Education? - Dumbing Down Our Kids

Common Core Standards: Is This A One-Size Fits All Type Of Education? - Dumbing Down Our Kids.
Priscilla Der's insight:

Debate over the controversy of the one-size-fits all Common Core standards. Is Common Core rigorous and challenging? The opposing mother makes good points as to whether this curriculum is preparing students for college. As a pre-teacher candidate, I understand that all students are different in abilities, experiences, and skills. Is it fair to mandate a set of standards when you know children have such variation in abilities. Certainly my EDCI280 has shown me that there are all types of children with all different types of abilities, so the question here is: should teachers strictly teach to these standards regardless of their student's background or should they take note of the variations and teach accordingly?

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