Progressive Learning
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Progressive Education in the 40s

Progressive Education in the 40s | Progressive Learning | Scoop.it
A video demonstrating the Progressive Education movement.Have we changed?
JennaMRyan's insight:

This video depicts education in the 40s.  It opens with the children reciting Psalm 23.  They sat through endless classroom drills such as reciting multiplication tables.  The teacher would point to a state and say the name and the children would repeat the name.  It shows a young boy bent over while the teacher beat him with a stick on his back side.  At Columbia University President Kilpatrick shared how important learning by doing, learning about practical every day problems, and practical teaching.  "A child can dictate what he sees before he can read about it in a book."  Teachers show how learning can be fun.  The "project" is the best method of progressive teaching.  For instance, buying something at the store involves arithmetic.  Students prepare their own food and learn that butter comes from cream and cream comes from cows.  Managing the school store is an advanced exercise in practical business.  Real world application is accompanied by creative writing for a well rounded schooling experience.  John Dewey is depicted giving a speech in this clip stating we must prepare the children for their world, the world of the future.

 

I am so impressed with this video.  It sounds to me like this progressive education concept was revolutionary in the 40s.  There will always be skeptics when there is change, but through proven results, the real world application is way more effective for teaching and for learning.  The recitation that was happening prior to the progressive education movement was boring and not engaging.  Children must learn through experiencing things hands on.  This is helping me to grow in my experiences because I was working with children in my field placement on money and they just weren't getting it.  I feel that if they were to integrate social studies with their math curriculum by crossing some business principles and production with money by making a school classroom where they make and buy things and sell them, the students would come in to a better understanding of money.  Right now they are filling out worksheets with hypothetical scenarios on them and its just not clicking.  Children have to do to learn.

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Building Future Skills: a more progressive approach to STEM lessons

Building Future Skills: a more progressive approach to STEM lessons | Progressive Learning | Scoop.it
The E-learning advisors at the ICT Development Service strongly support the principle that creativity and education go hand in hand, but appreciate that this approach can be overlooked within the existing curriculum.
JennaMRyan's insight:

The Professional Development Centre at the Wegnock House is managed by ICT (Information & Computer Technology) Development Service.  The recommendation of the pilot study is "that teachers should be given better support and resources to enable them to lead and facilitate progressive STEM lessons."  The training programs the ICT offers is held at the Innovation Studio and about ten teachers complete a full day of hands on and theory.  Essentially teachers learn more creative methods of teaching and learning.  Thus far, hundreds of teachers have undertaken the training.  Seeing the studio in action, many schools have come to develop their own ideas based on the recommendations of the study.

 

I support the notion that teacher need proper training.  Training must be more than lectures they attend.  If we want teacher's classrooms to be hands on and interactive then we need to use best practices when training teachers, too.  STEM training in particular is especially difficult for some teachers and students to learn and teach well, so these subjects need to be especially hands on.  In these subject areas, lecture only goes so far.  Progressive classrooms start with progressive training.

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Progressively Worse : Education Next

Progressively Worse : Education Next | Progressive Learning | Scoop.it
JennaMRyan's insight:

Cheney states progressive education is a failure.  In a progressive classroom, children  “should be told as little as possible, and induced to discover as much as possible.”  It says the lessons start out in the concrete and end in the abstract.  Developmentalism says children can only learn certain things at certain stages in their development roughly based on the writing of Piaget.  By buying into this thinking we are basically treating children as though they can't really think.  Two problems are pointed out in this article.  First, the assertion that literacy and rationality are costly makes us lose the ability to generate metaphors.  Second, it's an issue that progressive educators regard literacy and rationality as "unmixed blessings."  Cheney concludes that it was admirable for Egan to take on such an important topic, but he should have depicted progressive thought a little more accurately.

 

In my opinion, I agree developmentalism is a little too ridged for the classroom.  The notion that students must learn a certain concept at only one stage in their development is compartmentalizing children's learning abilities too much.  Children are different and learn at different rates and I believe with proper instruction, they can learn at any stage in development.  I grew from this article because it opened my eyes to some flawed philosophy widely held in education.

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Building Future Skills: embedding hands-on learning in the curriculum

Building Future Skills: embedding hands-on learning in the curriculum | Progressive Learning | Scoop.it
... future skills and to consider the role of creativity and playful learning in the classroom.
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Why Academic Teaching Doesn’t Help Kids Excel In Life

Why Academic Teaching Doesn’t Help Kids Excel In Life | Progressive Learning | Scoop.it
Teacher Shelley Wright explains why a school system that revolves around academics fails to teach kids what they really need to know.
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Five Best Practices for the Flipped Classroom

Five Best Practices for the Flipped Classroom | Progressive Learning | Scoop.it

Ok, I'll be honest. I get very nervous when I hear education reformists and politicians tout how "incredible" the flipped classroom model, or how it will "solve" many of the problems of education. It doesn't solve anything. It is a great first step in reframing the role of the teacher in the classroom. It fosters the "guide on the side" mentality and role, rather than that of the "sage of the stage." It helps move a classroom culture towards student construction of knowledge rather than the teacher having to tell the knowledge to students.


Via Nik Peachey
JennaMRyan's insight:

In Kevin Miller's blog on flipped classrooms, he cautions leaders who believe the flipped classroom model is going to save America's schools.  While he admits it's a great first step in changing the role of the teacher in the classroom, he knows it will surely fail unless the educator is really prepared and approaches it correctly.  He suggests five areas to focus on if you plan to implement the flipped classroom model in your school.  They are the following: Need to know, engaging models, technology, reflection, time and place.  Miller insists that the flipped model will fail if the video content the teacher presents in recorded format is not something the kids have a "need to know."  He also suggests teachers use engaging models in class such as "project-based learning (PBL), game-based learning (GBL), Understanding by Design (UbD), or authentic literacy."  Next, he cautions that technology and the potential that students lack access to proper resources will hinder the success of flipping the classroom.  He also states the student engagement should go beyond watching a video, but include some kind of reflection activity in which children are directed to process the information they just took in.  Finally, he warns educators that the proper time and place are critical because teachers need to make sure that the style of learning in their environment is conducive to this flipped model.


My reflection of this blog is that I believe Miller presents realistic hurdles that educators should plan ahead for.  Some of his points may see pessimistic, however, I believe his points are quite valid and will serve educators well if they heed his warnings.  Miller seems experienced and gives those considering the flipped model of education some good points to ponder.  In my teaching, I feel this model could be successfully implemented once a month if I am aware of the socioeconomic status of my students and inquire about the resources they have access too.  It's really not fair to expect students to go home and watch an online video lecture that relates to the activity in class if they don't have access to a computer.  Demanding they go to a library is just no realistic for some children and families.  I believe this type of progressive learning has its place and purpose in education, but Miller's blog shows that it's really still just emerging into a valid classroom model and should be approached hesitantly for now.  I feel extremely intrigued and challenged by this model classroom and I would love to implement aspects of a flipped classroom in the future.

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Getting The Lecture Out Of The Room: An Argument For Blended Learning

Getting The Lecture Out Of The Room: An Argument For Blended Learning | Progressive Learning | Scoop.it

"Justified or not, lecture stands as perhaps the single symbol of non-progressive learning. The visual is clear enough for most. A sage-on-stage stands and delivers wisdom and expertise while attentive learners jot down what they can that sounds important for later exploration."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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Still in Favor of the Flip - Inside Higher Ed

Still in Favor of the Flip - Inside Higher Ed | Progressive Learning | Scoop.it
Still in Favor of the Flip
Inside Higher Ed
Members of the didactic camp oppose flipping the classroom to preserve the role of the lecturer, while the progressive camp instead advocates for a move toward project-based learning and inquiry.

Via Chris Carter
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Chris Carter's curator insight, October 30, 2013 12:05 PM

Beyond the smoke and mirrors.

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Progressive Learning

Progressive Learning | Progressive Learning | Scoop.it
JennaMRyan's insight:

This video is an introduction to a progressive learning program that schools can implement in their classrooms.  Different components of the program include prizes for perfect attendance, their own email address, and e-mail mentorship relationships.  These mentorships are academic coaches who work from home and mentor students because they are former teachers themselves.  Everyday the student has someone with whom they can talk who they never meet.  The students say they talk about life, too.  It serves a school that has children who don't do well in regular public school classrooms.  They wanted to show impressive results with some of the most difficult students so they can show the importance of personal interventions.  They end up opening up to the anonymous individual on the other end of the line who can give insight to the actual classroom teacher.

 

I am somewhat skeptical of people who communicate with students during school.  These satellite teachers essentially only communicate with students via email.  The program shows students opening up so much more to these people they never see face to face than they did to their actual teacher.  I would totally support additional mentorships in the classroom.  There needs to be some kind of accountability for the things said in the emails.  Assuming everything goes well with that relationship, I can really picture this program being a huge interest to the students because this day and age is so technologically driven.  Students see really motivated by their mentor teachers.  I think it's a cool idea and I would love to implement some mentorship in my classroom via email somehow.

 

http://vimeo.com/13312656

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Progressive Education.mov

JennaMRyan's insight:

Progressive education movement was founded in 1883 in Chicago.  Francis W. Parker studied Pestalozzi and Frogo who said "learning should emanate from the interests and needs of the child and the most appropriate curriculum was an activity based one that encouraged children to express themselves freely and creatively.  They wanted to incorporate natures studies, field trips, art, and social activities all while keeping the child at the center."  Dewey wanted to ditch the rigid subject-centered curriculum in favor of a child-centered curriculum.

The seven guidelines principles of the Progressive education association:

1. The child's freedom should develop naturally

2.interest provides motivation for all work

3. The teacher acts as a guide in the learning process

4. The scientific study of pupil development

5. Greater attention was paid to everything that affects the child's physical development

6.cooperation between the school and home and meeting the natural interests and activities of the child 

7. The progressive school was supposed to be a leader in educational movements.

 

I agree these seven guiding principles.  This video gave me some insight into how old this concept of progressive, child-centered education really is.  The desired for progressive education was really born from parents recognizing that schooling the "old fashioned way" really wasn't meeting their children's needs.  I personally feel that when this develop because people are passionate about finding a better way to do things for their children, they will stick because there is a real, felt need for them.  This video challenged me to see what things are happening a certain way today that might need to be changed and addressed to continue to adapt to meet the changing needs of the children schools serve.

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Arendt's argument against progressive education | Wide Awake Minds

Arendt's argument against progressive education | Wide Awake Minds | Progressive Learning | Scoop.it
Ideas about education policy, philosophy, and practice, with a special focus on self-education and lifelong learning.
JennaMRyan's insight:

Arendt is strongly opposed to progressive teaching practices.  She has three main mistaken assumptions at heart of progressive education.  First, she claims that when children are left to their own devices to learn there tends to either be conformism or juvenile delinquency.  Second, teacher's authority rests in their knowledge of content and pedagogy developed only as a derivative of that knowledge.  Third, she thinks that vocational education is a reflection of the school's inability to make the children acquire normal prerequisites for standard curriculum.  She concludes that progressive education removes the responsibility of adults in the classroom.  She says the best preparation for the child for the world of work is creating a habit of work and not-playing.  Teacher’s authority rests in their assumption for the responsibility for the world.

 

I disagree with the article.  According to Arendt, adults need to assume responsibility for the world and teach children accordingly.  I don't think progressive classrooms are going to cause the world to be "overrun and destroyed."  She says we can best prepare our children by creating a habit of work and not-play and I strongly disagree with this statement.  While there is something to be said for disciplined time and study, children can learn more effectively if they learn by playing.  You have to speak kids' language and that means give them opportunities to play and explore and set them up to learn while doing so.  While I agree, it is risky to take classic lecture out of classrooms entirely; there is a way to find a happy medium that will allow children to learn on a more developmentally appropriate level.

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Reinventing School From the Ground Up For Inquiry Learning

Reinventing School From the Ground Up For Inquiry Learning | Progressive Learning | Scoop.it
Can inquiry-based and project-based learning exist in a traditional industrial-age school? It may be time for schools to invent fresh ecosystems designed specifically for inquiry.
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The Flipped Classroom: Turning the Traditional Classroom on its Head

Many educators are experimenting with the idea of a flipped classroom model. Find out what it is and why everyone's talking about it.
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Examining Current Teaching Practices

Examining Current Teaching Practices | Progressive Learning | Scoop.it

The first video shows a traditional teacher-centered approach, and the second video shows how you can use progressive withdrawal to gradually shift the burden of responsibility for the learning from the teacher, where it traditionally is, to the student where it belongs.


Via Karen Bonanno
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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, April 17, 2013 5:09 AM

The second video is a classic demonstration of how you can teach required content and 21st-century higher order thinking skills (in this case, Bloom’s Taxonomy. 

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The Paradigm Shift: 4 Goals Of 21st Century Learning

The Paradigm Shift: 4 Goals Of 21st Century Learning | Progressive Learning | Scoop.it

As academic standards shift, technology evolves, and student habits change, schools are being forced to consider new ways of framing curriculum and engaging students in the classroom, and project-based learning is among the most successful and powerful of these possibilities.

 

As both a planning and a learning tool, project-based learning challenges teachers to make new decisions about how they plan student learning experiences, while simultaneously empowering students to take a more active role in the learning process.

 

In this context of trying to make since of exactly what progressive learning was, in 2009 I sketched out a graphic that visualized 9 Characteristics of 21st Century Learning, and recently created a follow-up framework, The Inside-Out Learning Model.


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, November 2, 2013 9:31 PM

This is an effective model to review and adapt to the learning environment that you have in place.

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Why Kids Need to Tinker to Learn

Why Kids Need to Tinker to Learn | Progressive Learning | Scoop.it

"The Maker Movement http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/tag/maker-movement/ ; has inspired progressive educators to bring more hands-on learning and tinkering into classrooms, and educator Gary Stager would like to see formal schooling be influenced by the Maker Movement, which has inspired young learners to tinker, to learn by doing, and take agency for their learning."


Via John Evans
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Lisa Carey's curator insight, August 27, 2014 4:28 PM

Action & Expression!

Michael MacNeil's curator insight, August 28, 2014 11:07 AM

The Maker movement taps into the very heart of learning adding purpose and practice to pedagogy,  a heutagogical approach.  How's that for an educational classification?