Progress - Humans move forwards - we'll get there!
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Progress - Humans move forwards - we'll get there!
Progress, learning, sciences, art, invention, creativity - new, or a new version and it makes you feel good hearing about, it fits
Curated by Roger Ellman
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Tribeca Film Festival: Filmmaker and Futurist Jason Silva On How Humans Are Hardwired for Story and Cinema

Tribeca Film Festival: Filmmaker and Futurist Jason Silva On How Humans Are Hardwired for Story and Cinema | Progress - Humans move forwards - we'll get there! | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Roger Ellman's insight:

Jason Silva's bubbling, boiling contagious and enthusiastic deliberations are themselves, charged with energy and inspiring stories.

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, April 22, 2014 1:02 AM


Paula Bernstein:  "As part of Tribeca Film Festival's "Future of Film" series, on April 22nd filmmaker and futurist Jason Silva will be muse about how humans are hardwired for story and cinema" ...

Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist's curator insight, April 22, 2014 3:56 AM
As part of Tribeca Film Festival's "Future of Film" series, tomorrow, April 22, filmmaker and futurist Jason Silva (dubbed the "Timothy Leary of the Viral Video Age" by The Atlantic) will muse about how humans are hardwired for story and cinema. 
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Of Hellabytes and Recombinant Innovation: The Second Machine Age

Andrew McAfee argues that we are advancing so rapidly that our progress is no longer about a difference in degree, but a difference in kind. Along with Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew is the co-author of The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies


Via Szabolcs Kósa
Roger Ellman's insight:

Fair 4.5 minutes video address ( 30% information 70% inspiration) on our step up to new progress levels - rather than just mulitplication etc, and the new shapes of progress building upon progress. Not a revelation, but good to be supported and reminded that we are moving on!

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IBM Research creates new foundation to program SyNAPSE chips

IBM Research creates new foundation to program SyNAPSE chips | Progress - Humans move forwards - we'll get there! | Scoop.it

Scientists from IBM unveiled on Aug. 8 a breakthrough software ecosystem designed for programming silicon chips that have an architecture inspired by the function, low power, and compact volume of the brain.
The technology could enable a new generation of intelligent sensor networks that mimic the brain’s abilities for perception, action, and cognition.
Dramatically different from traditional software, IBM’s new programming model breaks the mold of sequential operation underlying today’s von Neumann architectures and computers.
It is instead tailored for a new class of distributed, highly interconnected, asynchronous, parallel, large-scale cognitive computing architectures.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
Roger Ellman's insight:

Chip breakhtroughs are most important in getting our progress meters revving faster for all areas of technology. The benefits of the faster processing of date and/or the faster processing of complex control routines are enormnous.

 

Roger

SuperbWorld - ServingExperience

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IT's curator insight, August 18, 2013 1:27 PM

Vědci z IBM představili průlomový software "ekosystemu" určený pro programování křemíkových čipů.

Tato technologie by mohla umožnit novou generaci inteligentních senzorových sítí, které napodobují mozkové schopnosti jako je vnímání, učení a činnost. V budoucnosti už nebude místo pro obyčejný mozek bez využití této a futurističtější technologie.

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New Technology Inspires a Rethinking of Light

New Technology Inspires a Rethinking of Light | Progress - Humans move forwards - we'll get there! | Scoop.it

After the joy of the birth itself, parenthood sometimes brings the unwelcome news that a newborn has jaundice and must wear goggles and be placed under special lights. Imagine how different this experience might be if there were no goggles, just a warm blanket covering the tiny body, a healing frequency of blue light emanating from its folds.
That comforting scene, already a reality in some hospitals, is evidence of the fundamental rethinking of lighting now under way in research labs, executive offices and investor conferences. Digital revolutionaries have Edison’s 130-year-old industry, and its $100 billion in worldwide revenue, in their sights. Color, control and function are all being reassessed, and new players have emerged like a wave of Silicon Valley start-ups.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
Roger Ellman's insight:

Pleasing and forward progress, a good combination

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This Material Will Power the Future — If Somebody Can Profit From It

This Material Will Power the Future — If Somebody Can Profit From It | Progress - Humans move forwards - we'll get there! | Scoop.it

Since 2010, graphene has been on the fast track. It is being groomed for a role in materials that typically take years and sometimes decades before they develop into products that transform the way people do things in everyday life. On a recent visit to the University of Manchester, which remains the center of the graphene “revolution,” physicists and engineers are trying hard to move their home-developed technology off the lab bench and into commercial products. To do it, they’ll have to develop a graphene “killer app” that possesses distinct advantages over existing technologies — and doesn’t cost too much to manufacture.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
Roger Ellman's insight:

It is worth reading any detailed article on the progress of developing Graphene applications and this one is another to check off the list. Graphene is going to be VERY important....soon.

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More AI for developers as Expect Labs releases the MindMeld API

More AI for developers as Expect Labs releases the MindMeld API | Progress - Humans move forwards - we'll get there! | Scoop.it

Expect Labs, makers of the MindMeld app for dynamically suggesting content in response to the topics in a spoken conversation, is opening its artificial intelligence engine to the world via the new MindMeld API. It’s the latest example of just how powerful APIs are becoming and offers yet another glimpse into how intelligent we will expect applications to be in the years to come.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
Roger Ellman's insight:
Some AI news will be action taking place right now, some will be premature and some will surprise us by happening NOW or decades ahead - so glance at all ideas - that's best for keeping abreast!
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Terry Yelmene's curator insight, March 1, 2014 7:37 PM

This API can enable automated curation and should be considered as a real advantage in some dev projects.

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Paul Allen and the Machines: Teaching the next generation of artificial intelligence

Paul Allen and the Machines: Teaching the next generation of artificial intelligence | Progress - Humans move forwards - we'll get there! | Scoop.it

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen has been pondering artificial intelligence since he was a kid. In the late '60s, eerily intelligent computers were everywhere, whether it was 2001's HAL or Star Trek's omnipresent Enterprise computer. As Allen recalls in his memoir, "machines that behaved like people, even people gone mad, were all the rage back then." He would tag along to his father's job at the library, overwhelmed by the information, and daydream about "the sci-fi theme of a dying or threatened civilization that saves itself by finding a trove of knowledge." What if you could collect all the world's information in a single computer mind, one capable of intelligent thought, and be able to communicate in simple human language? 

Forty years later, with nearly 9 billion dollars to Allen's name, that idea is beginning to seem like more than just fantasy. Much of the technology is already here. We talk to our phones and aren't surprised when they talk back. A web search can answer nearly any question, undergirded by a semantic understanding of the structure of online information. But while the tools are powerful, the processes behind them are still fairly basic. Siri only understands a small subset of questions, and she can't reason, or do anything you might call thinking. Even Watson, IBM'sJeopardy champ, can only handle simple questions with unambiguous phrasing. Already, Google is looking to the Star Trek computer as a guiding light for its voice search — but it's still a long way off. If technology is going to get there, we'll need computers that are better at talking and, more crucially, better at reasoning.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
Roger Ellman's insight:

Food, or a at least a snack.., for thought

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Molecular Nuclear Medicine: making personalized treatment a reality

Molecular Nuclear Medicine is a medical specialty using trace amounts of active substances, called radiopharmaceuticals, to create images of organs and lesions and to treat various diseases, like cancer. This documentary explains how SPECT and PET work, and how Radio Metabolic Therapy can treat cancer. A 22' journey from the history of radioactivity and cancer to the most modern Theragnostic techniques.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
Roger Ellman's insight:

Going forward...you will be your onw person in medical treatments, as you are if you allow it out of the bag, in all other areas! Progress..

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Tiny Chiplets Are a New Level of Micro Manufacturing

Tiny Chiplets Are a New Level of Micro Manufacturing | Progress - Humans move forwards - we'll get there! | Scoop.it

Under a microscope, four slivers of silicon — electronic circuits called chiplets — perform an elaborate, jerky dance as if controlled by a hidden puppet master. Then on command, they all settle with pinpoint accuracy, precisely touching a pattern of circuit wires, each at just the right point of contact.
The technology, on display at Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center, or PARC, is part of a new system for making electronics, one that takes advantage of a Xerox invention from the 1970s: the laser printer.
If perfected, it could lead to desktop manufacturing plants that “print” the circuitry for a wide array of electronic devices — flexible smartphones that won’t break when you sit on them; a supple, pressure-sensitive skin for a new breed of robot hands; smart-sensing medical bandages that could capture health data and then be thrown away.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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