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Medical Student

Medical Student | programs for medical | Scoop.it

Via Titom
Sunny Huang's insight:

I find this picture very interesting and funny. My goal is to be a surgeon, hopefully a cardiac sergeon. In order to be surgeon, many years of study are required. Being a doctor is not just about getting paid with good wages or wear cool uniforms, it's more about having the well and persistence to undergo difficult situations.

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U.S. Medical Research Accelerating Quest for HIV Cure | IIP Digital

U.S. Medical Research Accelerating Quest for HIV Cure | IIP Digital | programs for medical | Scoop.it
Finding a cure for HIV is among the great medical challenges of the age, and President Obama is directing the U.S. research community to accelerate its efforts toward that goal.

Via Ugtrendz
Sunny Huang's insight:

I think it's really important that people are accelerating in looking for cure for HIV. Many people die each year because of HIV. I hope one day I can join in to look for cure for HIV.

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Rescooped by Sunny Huang from Care coordination
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Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills Are Killing Us | TIME.com

Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills Are Killing Us | TIME.com | programs for medical | Scoop.it
How outrageous pricing and egregious profits are destroying our health care (3rd party (Big Insurer, Big hospital, Big Pharma) managed health care, aided by the gov't, is bankrupting us.

Via Ginny Dillon, Cheryl Acres
Sunny Huang's insight:

Medical bills are extremely expensive these days. Medical insurance can be very expensive as well. There are portion of the population that die because of expensive medical bills. I think everybody should have a chance of being cured even though they might be poor.

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Rescooped by Sunny Huang from OffStage
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Young actor suffers cardiac arrest on stage, now fights to help others - WDAF

Young actor suffers cardiac arrest on stage, now fights to help others - WDAF | programs for medical | Scoop.it

A young actor performing a scene in the middle of a musical goes into cardiac arrest while on stage. The 20-year-old actor, Jake Leet, was playing the fun-loving character, Donkey, during a performance of Shrek the Musical at the Theatre Lawrence when he went into cardiac arrest. Doctors are now saying it is a miracle he is still alive, and now his near-death experience is making a difference.


Via KCStage
Sunny Huang's insight:

I think it is really great to have somebody who can spread positive influence to young people today. With the positive influence, more people will see the hope in doctors and believe in themselves that they can get better. People that survives through the hard times will become very strong. This post is very encourageing.

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Biggest Innovations in Medical Technology in 2013

Biggest Innovations in Medical Technology in 2013 | programs for medical | Scoop.it

The field of medical technology is incredibly exciting these days. Each breakthrough has the potential to impact the lives of thousands of patients, sometimes changing the course of medical history and forever improving the human experience. Such can be argued for antibiotics, x-rays, vaccines, or even things as seemingly simple as disposable medical instruments (an extremely important sanitary innovation). Year after year, teams of research physicians and engineers work to advance our knowledge and abilities.


This article reviews some of the most influential medical innovations of the past year. From new insights in the treatment of diabetes to a new type of optical surgical procedure, incredible innovations and advancements have been achieved this year.


Implant Relieving Severe Headache Pain

A new type of neuromodulation therapy has emerged that seems to be an effective treatment for cluster and migraine headaches. Neuromodulation therapy treats a cluster of nerves behind the face that signal headache pain. This device, implanted in the face by way of the mouth, is positioned to stimulate the facial nerve that relieves headaches when stimulated. A separate device, placed on the cheek, activates the device, relieving pain in as quickly as five to ten minutes. 


Bariatric Surgeries Treating Diabetes

Doctors who have performed bariatric surgery, also known as gastric bypass, have noted in the past that many of their patients had gone into diabetes remission as they recovered from surgery. This evidence has some health care professionals advocating gastric bypass treatment as an early tactic for fighting diabetes, instead of as a last-resort effort.


Bee Venom Treats HIV

One toxin found in bee venom, melittin, has been found to destroy HIV particles. Researchers claim that the particles break apart the physical structure of the virus, but are too small to have an impact on other cells within the body. A proposed method for distributing the chemical is a topical virucidal agent.


Detecting Skin Cancer with a Hand-held Device

Caught at an early stage, the survival rate for melanoma is 99 percent. In advanced stages, though, that rate drops to a mere 15 percent.

The good thing about the skin and its relation to cancer is that we can observe it. Visual detection is the best way to prevent advanced stage melanoma. Therefore checking moles and other discoloration on the skin regularly can be the best form of early detection. If a patient notices a change and brings it to the attention of their dermatologist, this new device is able to scan the area and report to the physician whether or not melanoma is present within a few seconds. It works by analyzing a database of over 10,000 images alongside a structural scan of the skin using military-grade optical technology. Clinical trials show that this device is nearly 98% effective.


Cataract Surgery at one Quadrillionth of a Second

Femtosecond laser technology will help improve the outcome in the more than 1.6 million annual cataract surgeries that are performed in the US annually. The apparatus, which separates the tissue by ablating and cleaving it, instead of cutting it, operates in one quadrillionth of a second. Its speed and precision help reduce swelling post-op, allow less time to be spent on the eye, and help the surgeon be more accurate with the implant. Optical surgeons across the globe are eager to implement this new device in order to improve their practice.



More at the original at : http://medcitynews.com/2013/12/biggest-innovations-medical-technology-2013/


Via Parag Vora, nrip
Sunny Huang's insight:
These days medical technologies are growing really fast. With the amount of hard work and effort scientists, researchers, and doctors have put in, many medical problems are being solved. I can't wait to enter the medical field and see what my knowledge can do to save people's lives.
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Accelerated Medical Programs Are Not for Everyone

Related posts: Accelerated Nursing Program Licensed Vocational Nursing Programs Guaranteed in full College Nursing Grant Prime Medical Universities – There’s Extra To Medicine Than Grey’s Structure Occupational Treatment University’s Ot Assistant...
Sunny Huang's insight:

I truly agree with the idea the writer is trying to express. There are always more to learn in the Medical field and not just some simple topics. In order to be successful in a designated field, learning new things is always required.

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Programs

Programs | programs for medical | Scoop.it
SUNY Downstate Medical Center is one of the nation's leading urban medical centers, serving the people of Brooklyn since 1860. (Summer 2014 Opportunities to student interested in Health and Science with SUNY Downstate Medical Center.
Sunny Huang's insight:

This SUNY Downstate Medical Center has served many people since 1860. I would like to go visit sometimes and I'll learn alot from the this experience.

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Rescooped by Sunny Huang from RMs Future of Healthcare
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Travel medical apps to aid chronic patients when travelling

Travel medical apps to aid chronic patients when travelling | programs for medical | Scoop.it

Travelers with chronic ailments like diabetes or high blood pressure have long struggled to remember when to take their pills as they cross time zones. Or they may have had a hard time finding emergency care in a foreign country or communicating about complicated health conditions.

But there are now a rapidly growing number of mobile health and medical apps that aim to deal with those types of situations.

¶ Travelers can tap into technology before the trip begins, by storing information that can help ensure the right care is delivered if health issues crop up. Some put their medical history, latest EKG, chest X-ray or list of allergies and medications on a flash drive marked with a red cross, and attach it to a necklace, bracelet or keychain. Those who have had cardiac or other surgery may create a simple image using the free app drawMD for iPad devices that shows the exact location of a stent, for example, or an implant or bypass. For travelers who prefer a traditional method of communicating, a laminated card lists important information and physician contacts.

¶ The Transportation Security Administration has a printable card available on its Web site for those who want to make their medical condition known discreetly to a security agent and discuss or undergo any screenings in private.

¶ Medical devices contained in their own bags do not count toward carry-on bag limitations, though not all airport employees know this. Mellanie True Hills, founder of StopAfib.org, a nonprofit group dedicated to helping those living with atrial fibrillation, says she is often stopped by check-in, security or gate agents and told that the machine that helps with her sleep apnea puts her over the carry-on bag limit and that she will have to check one of her pieces of luggage. The agents relent, Ms. Hills said, when she produces a laminated copy of the applicable T.S.A. regulation she has printed from the agency’s Web site.

¶ Dr. Robert Glatter, attending physician at Lenox Hill Hospital’s department of emergency medicine in Manhattan, suggested that travelers with chronic ailments look for specialists and hospitals at their destinations before they leave home. For those who have not planned ahead but need urgent care, phone apps can help locate nearby medical help. The Emergency Medical Center Locator, a free iPhone app, uses the phone’s GPS to find nearby centers. The app lists nearly 2,400 medical centers in 101 countries, and users can select from six specialty areas, including trauma, eye and cardiac care. While not every medical center is listed, the ones that are have been approved by credentialing societies like the American College of Cardiology.

¶ Time zone changes can be extra challenging for patients, like those with diabetes, with a 24-hour monitoring schedule. Phone apps like Glucose Buddy and GluCoMo remind users to track and record their blood sugar levels.

¶ WellDoc’s DiabetesManager, available on a variety of mobile and Web-based platforms, provides feedback based on glucose, medication, food and exercise information that patients enter, advising them on the actions they should take to adhere to their treatment plan. Anand K. Iyer, president of WellDoc, is a diabetes patient who travels frequently himself. He contrasts the feedback to a radio’s traffic report. “It’s nice to know if there’s a backup, but what I really want to know is the best route home,” he said. “If I’m told my glucose is too high or low, I want to know what actions I can take.”

¶ The app RxmindMe Prescription/Medicine Reminder and Pill Tracker for iPods and iPhones does what its name says and reminds travelers when to take their medicine. Users put in their medication names or search the database, and then specify when they want to be reminded to take them. The app can notify the user when medications need to be reordered, and the device’s camera can add a photograph of the pill.

¶ For travelers who put all their pills in a plastic bag instead of taking separate pill bottles (this is not recommended) the free app Epocrates can help identify them by taking the user through a list of questions about the pill’s color, shape and markings. The app can also be used to double-check the identification of any pills received on the road or review possible side effects or drug interactions.

¶ Dr. Myles Druckman, vice president of medical services for International SOS, which assists multinational organizations with customized health plans for their global travelers, said travelers needed to plan what they would do if their trip was extended. He suggested bringing an extra week’s supply of medicine. “No one knows when an overnight trip will turn into a multiday volcano ash delay,” he said.

¶ Because of language barriers or differences in equipment or supplies, travel to other countries, especially developing nations, can bring an extra set of challenges in a health crisis. Some companies contract with travel assistance providers like International SOS, which has offices in more than 70 countries, to help employees who fall ill or need medical advice. Local offices can deal with issues by phone, give health advice or refer the employee to the appropriate hospital, clinic or doctor. International SOS also offers a phone app that sends general health and security information pertinent to the traveler’s itinerary, noting, for instance, if there is an outbreak of a particular disease in the area.

¶ Apps are also available for doctors in case they are called upon to provide curbside or in-plane assistance. EyeChart can help evaluate patients who complain about their vision and uHear about their hearing. NeuroMind can take physicians through a series of questions to help diagnose a patient who has had a head trauma or is unresponsive.

¶ New apps are appearing every week, and they vary in quality. Paul Cerrato, who reviews medical apps as the editor of InformationWeek Healthcare, said, “Some apps have major research behind them and others don’t seem to have done their homework.” Mr. Cerrato recommended that patients consult with their health care provider to choose the best app for their situation.

¶ While most of the medical apps today record, remind and refer, the future holds more diagnostic uses like the iBGStar Blood Glucose Monitoring System, which features a small meter that plugs directly into the iPhone or iPod Touch. Patients insert a test strip into the meter to take a blood sugar reading, and the information is automatically synced with the app. Another is a blood pressure cuff that can attach to a smartphone. Both can send results to a home physician from a hotel room or business meeting across the world. “These apps are really game changers,” Mr. Cerrato said, “for everyone.”

 ahp as Health Aide


Via Chaturika Jayadewa, Randy Matheson
Sunny Huang's insight:

Many people have smart phones or tablets these days. Medical apps that can be installed into a device will make things easier and quicker. So doctors can have more time to look at different cases. I look forward to more medical or science related apps.

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Medical students at UW learn practical skills with unique tools - The Seattle Times

Medical students at UW learn practical skills with unique tools - The Seattle Times | programs for medical | Scoop.it
Medical students at UW learn practical skills with unique tools
The Seattle Times
Medical students at UW learn practical skills with unique tools.

Via Sergey Ruseev
Sunny Huang's insight:

I'm glad to see how the school of my dream have all these unique lessons. It is always good to practice before handling real situations. With the amount of practice, when the real situation comes, doctors will be more prepared and calm. I can't wait to see those unique tools!!

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Rescooped by Sunny Huang from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
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Medical Ignorance, Arrogance and Brutality A Danger To Babies | Vaccination Information Network

Medical Ignorance, Arrogance and Brutality A Danger To Babies | Vaccination Information Network | programs for medical | Scoop.it
“Injury to mothers and their young is the basest form of cruelty.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
Sunny Huang's insight:

I was a little shocked after I read this article. Even though doctors save lives, sometimes doctors can also cause people's deaths. It is important that doctors know what they are doing. A simple mistake in deciding treatments or

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Medical Student

Medical Student | programs for medical | Scoop.it

Via Titom
Sunny Huang's insight:

I find this picture very interesting and funny. My goal is to be a surgeon, hopefully a cardiac sergeon. In order to be surgeon, many years of study are required. Being a doctor is not just about getting paid with good wages or wear cool uniforms, it's more about having the well and persistence to undergo difficult situations.

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Rescooped by Sunny Huang from Study in china - Good Education for Student
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Why Study in China, Medical University programs, Good Education for Students

Why Study in China, Medical University programs, Good Education for Students | programs for medical | Scoop.it
Why Study in china Medical university programs, other educational programs guide, china schools admission for foreign students, engineering college education,

Via studychina
Sunny Huang's insight:

As a Chinese, at a certain level I don't agree with the idea of the artical. But in some sense, I so agree with the writer that China is a very academic country. Students usuallly compete with each other on schools.

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