Programming and Creating with Technologies in Education
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Google and Apple Alums Invent Adorable Robots That Teach Kids to Code | Design | WIRED

Google and Apple Alums Invent Adorable Robots That Teach Kids to Code | Design | WIRED | Programming and Creating with Technologies in Education | Scoop.it
These adorable little robots have a big goal: teach kids computer programming.
Nadine Sheahan's insight:

This would be a wonderful resource in a classroom to facilitate students in learning to program. Through the use of these robots and iPad application, children are able to program the robots to move in certain ways, detect objects and follow simple or complex instruction sequences. Accessories can be added to give them special abilities which will provide opportunities for students to explore the variety of functions and develop solutions to solve problems. 

 

The best part about these Play-i robots is that they allow a hands on approach to programming where they can physically see their input taking place as an output performed by: 'Bo & 'Yana'. 

 

The purpose of educating students how to program is not just to produce a world of computer programmers, but innovative, creative and critical thinkers.

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Pivot Animator

Pivot Animator | Programming and Creating with Technologies in Education | Scoop.it
Nadine Sheahan's insight:

Pivot is an animation program that allows students to learn about coding by experimenting with simple step by step procedures to make a pivot move. This could be used in a maths lesson where students are learning about directions and needing to know about their left and right.

 

It also relates to the Technologies KLA of the Australian Curriculum  where students are required to represent a sequence of steps (ACARA, 2014; ACTDIP004). The educator could explain to their students that they want their pivot to move to the left or to the right and the student has to figure out how to make their pivot move in that particular direction.

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Education Apps – Apps for Coding on Tablets | UKEdChat.com - Supporting the #UKEdChat Education Community

Education Apps – Apps for Coding on Tablets | UKEdChat.com - Supporting the #UKEdChat Education Community | Programming and Creating with Technologies in Education | Scoop.it
Nadine Sheahan's insight:

 This article provides educators with a list of applications that can be used in the classroom to assist children in learning to code in fun and interactive ways.

 

Each of the suggested apps target a range of different skills students related to the Australian Technologies Curriculum. These include, but are not limited to: experimenting with simple step by step procedures to explore programmable devices, instruct objects or virtual objects to move in an intended manner i.e; following a path, develop problem solving skills and critical and creative thinking skills when presented with challenging situations. 

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Rules 101 - PuzzleScript Documentation

Nadine Sheahan's insight:

This is a resource that explains how to create games using PuzzleScript. It reminds me a little bit of pacman in terms of the retro layout of the games that can be produced. This could be a great resource to use in the older years if they have had prior experience with coding. It will enable students to be challenged whilst using the creative thinking and problem solving skills previously gained through engaging with programming. 

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10 Strategies To Get Your Students Coding

10 Strategies To Get Your Students Coding | Programming and Creating with Technologies in Education | Scoop.it
10 Strategies To Get Your Students Coding
Nadine Sheahan's insight:
This article acts a resource for educators by illustrating and explaining strategies to introduce coding into the classroom and the wider school community. If an educator can inspire students and other staff members to enter the world of code by making it exciting and less daunting then their chances of being able to implement the Technologies Curriculum more effectively could be possible.
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Children's Book 'Hello Ruby' Teaches 4- to 7-Year-Olds How to Code

Children's Book 'Hello Ruby' Teaches 4- to 7-Year-Olds How to Code | Programming and Creating with Technologies in Education | Scoop.it
Kickstarter-funded book 'Hello Ruby' will teach kids how to code, via an adventurous protagonist and interactive storytelling.
Nadine Sheahan's insight:

This Article and video takes you on the journey of one woman's dream to combine coding, software and storytelling in a children's book: 'Hello Ruby'. The author aims to make learning to code accessible for young children through the way of storytelling. She explains that 'Hello Ruby' goes beyond explaining coding and software as bits and pieces that make up a computer, but aiming to develop technology as a culture and new way of thinking. Children will learn about how to make smaller problems from big problems and sequencing and before they learn about programming vocabulary they learn about the art of programming through story telling.

 

Using this resource in the classroom will allow educators to pave the way for their students to begin thinking about programming and problem solving, enabling them to set the scene for implementing the Technologies Curriculum. As the author suggests in her video, storytelling has been used as a way to inspire the belief that something magical can be brought to life. Young children are more likely to remember a story and if prompted can refer to this when solving problems of their own. 

 

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15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer)

15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer) | Programming and Creating with Technologies in Education | Scoop.it
According to Code.org, 90 percent of U.S. schools are not teaching any computer science. Eyebrows have been raised this year as the U.K. passed a plan to educate every child how to code.

In my opini
Nadine Sheahan's insight:

This article illustrates the way in which educators can teach students how to begin simple programming. It also outlines the educational objectives for coding and the importance of programming for the future. It provides teachers with a list of websites or applications that students can use to describe or represent a series of steps for a purpose or to solve simple problems, essentially the beginning phases of programming (ACARA, 2014; ACTDIP004).

 

Teaching people how to program will assist them in learning how to think (Steve Jobs) . ACARA (2014) and MCEEDYA (2008)  recognises the importance of students leaving school as critical and creative thinkers, enabling them to approach a range of situations as innovative problem solvers. Teaching them how to approach tasks creatively  via coding will allow students to develop the critical and creative thinking skills they require to be active and informed citizens. 

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9 Things Every Student Should Be Able to Do with Google Drive ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

9 Things Every Student Should Be Able to Do with Google Drive ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Programming and Creating with Technologies in Education | Scoop.it
Nadine Sheahan's insight:

This article illustrates the potential Google Drive has to increase productivity in education. It provides students with the opportunity to create presentations, drawings and store documents online. This article discusses 9 things that students should be able to do with Google Drive, but for a year three and four primary context, I would consider these functions to be most useful:  highlighting words or phrases that can be researched without having to open up a new window. This function would allow students to find more information regarding a particular topic without having to get confused with opening numerous tabs and then possibly accidentally closing the wrong one. It also allows them to share their work and provide feedback to others. For example, students could be working on editing skills. The teacher could use Google Drive by pairing students together and asking them to write an individual short story.  Students could then use Google Drive to edit their partners work. The teacher would have access to these documents and can check on student progress. 

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50+Ways - home

50+Ways - home | Programming and Creating with Technologies in Education | Scoop.it
Nadine Sheahan's insight:

This article discusses ways in which students can tell a story. Part of the Australian curriculum requires children to collect data and use digital systems to present that data creatively (ACARA, 2014; ACTDIP003). 

 

This article provides a wide range of resources that teachers can assist their students in using to tell stories or present information researched in class. The added bonus of using such resources is the ability to share those resources worldwide.

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5 Reasons to Teach Kids To Code

5 Reasons to Teach Kids To Code | Programming and Creating with Technologies in Education | Scoop.it
Learn the basics of programming by helping blueFuzz and his family navigate the Technomazes on the planet Smeeborg!
Nadine Sheahan's insight:

 

This is a poster that provides 5 reasons why educators should be teaching children how to code. This resource will allow educators to make explaining the reasons behind coding in their classrooms to parents and fellow educators.

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Brain is a Computer - Lesson - www.TeachEngineering.org

Brain is a Computer - Lesson - www.TeachEngineering.org | Programming and Creating with Technologies in Education | Scoop.it
Students learn about the similarities between the human brain and its engineering counterpart, the computer. Since students work with computers routinely, this comparison strengthens their understanding of both how the brain works and how it parallels that of a computer. Students are also introduced to the "stimulus-sensor-coordinator-effector-response" framework for understanding human and robot actions.
Nadine Sheahan's insight:

This is a resource for educators to teach children about how their brain acts in the same way a computer does. It provides a step by step guide and other resources that can assist an educator in implementing this lesson. 

 

This would provide a great introductory start to setting the scene for why children should be exposed to programming, as it acts as a tool for creative and critical thinking in problem solving situations, which is essentially what ACARA aims to do through the Technologies Curriculum.

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Storybird - Create

Storybird - Create | Programming and Creating with Technologies in Education | Scoop.it
Get inspired by beautiful artwork to create and share your stories.
Nadine Sheahan's insight:

Storybird is a website that allows students to create their own stories online using themes provided. This allows students to create a sequence of events using story slides (ACAR, 2014; ACTDIP004). This would be perfect to use in English when writing short stories or as a fast finish activity for students in the classroom.

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Kodable Pro app teaches children to code on iPad - Apps Playground

Kodable Pro app teaches children to code on iPad - Apps Playground | Programming and Creating with Technologies in Education | Scoop.it
Late last year, an app called Kodable launched on iPad, promising to help kids learn to program by working their way through dozens of lessons/levels, in a game-like structure.

It was free with 30 lessons, and more available as an in-app purchase (IAP). Now its developer has launched Kodable Pro, a paid version of the app that includes "all current and future content" without any need for IAP.
Nadine Sheahan's insight:

 

This article discusses the application 'Kodable' that teaches children to code using an iPad in a game like manner. Children have to work through each level by navigating their 'Fuzz' through the techno mazes. The application aims to teach children logic, problem solving and critical thinking skills by giving children a new problem to face in each level and work out how to manoeuvre their fuzz to get them through the maze.

 

Using this application in the classroom will allow students to experiment with entering instructions to move their 'Fuzz' through the maze. This could be taken one step further by asking students to explain their thought processes and the strategies they used to assist them in working out how to navigate their 'Fuzz' out of the maze. This could also be turned into a learning activity where students have to come up with step by step instructions to assist another student in succeeding in a level within the application. (ACARA, 2014; ACTDIP004). 

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Code Club

Code Club | Programming and Creating with Technologies in Education | Scoop.it
Use the ROBO-BOOGIE tool to create the best dancing robot!
Nadine Sheahan's insight:

This website allows students in the early years to engage in simple coding. Children have to program the robots dance moves by adjusting the movement bars appropriately. This will also assist students in learning their left and right whilst engaging in programming.

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20 Google Docs Secrets for busy teachers and students.

20 Google Docs Secrets for busy teachers and students. | Programming and Creating with Technologies in Education | Scoop.it
Google Docs has revolutionised the way we create and edit content on the
web.  It is a genuine collaboration tool like nothing that has come before
it.

Up to 50 people can simultaneously edit a spreadsheet, presentation or
document at no expense, and it is available on all mobile and desktop
platforms.

Today we are going to look at 20 great tips every teacher and student
should be using to get the most of the collaborative learning opportunities
Google Doc’s offers.

Allow editing without signing in: If you’re sharing a document with
classmates who don’t have a Google login, just make it available to edit
without signing in.

Chat away: In Google Docs, you can see anyone who is currently editing the
document, and if needed, send a message to chat with them.

Embed Docs anywhere: Get a link to your document or spreadsheet, and you
can embed or publish it anywhere, including Facebook or a class blog.

Insert facts: Using Google Spreadsheet, it’s easy to insert facts, like a
countries’ population, which is simply pulled through the Google search
engine.

Create graphs: Visuals are great tools for getting your point across. Using
charts in Google Spreadsheets, you can create your very own
information-sharing graphs.

Create forms: Gather research information; ask for opinions, and more by
creating Forms in Google Docs.

Convert PDFs to images and text: Use Google Docs to make PDFs easily
editable.

Save to different file types: You can easily save your documents and
spreadsheets to commonly used file types like DOC, XLS, CSV, and HTML.

Using Google Docs in the Classroom Grd 6-8 By Steve Butz

Automatically add email addresses: If you have Google Apps, the email
addresses of the people who fill out the form will automatically be saved.

Hide chat: Keep everyone quiet during your presentation by clicking the
left side of the chat module.

Track edits and changes: In Google Docs you can go back and forth between
edits that you or collaborators made.

Remove collaborators: If you want to take someone off a project, click none
next to the name of the person you want to remove.

Turn it into a webpage: Download your document in HTML, and you can share
it as a webpage with a minimal amount of hassle. A great starting point for
students wishing to create a website.

Change ownership: Switch ownership of Google docs as project leaders
change.  You might need to transfer ownership of a document to a staff
member or student.  It’s easy.

Share an entire folder: If you’ve got a collection of documents to work on
together with students or staff, just open up a shared folder that everyone
can access and contribute to.

Adding video: Remember Google owns YouTube, so they know video.  You can
embed video in documents, slides, and more to dress up your presentation.

Track visits: Using Google Analytics, you can track how much traffic a
published document is receiving.  This is really useful if you need
feedback on whether your audience is actually getting involved.

Revert back to old versions: If your group doesn’t like a certain set of
changes made, it’s very simple just to revert back to automatically save
previous versions in the revision history.

Get Google Drive – Google Drive is the central place to manage all of your
online profile with Google and syncs with a number of devices.

Google Docs and Google Drive is an ever-evolving product that has provided
heavy competition for products such as Microsoft Office.  I am sure there
are many other useful tips you might be ware of and would love you to post
them below.
Nadine Sheahan's insight:

Google Docs is a useful resource for both educators and students to utilise in the classroom. Google Docs allows students to present and share data creatively to a wide range of audiences which relates to the processes and production skills of the Australian Curriculum (ACTDIP003).  

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An introduction to Google Apps in the primary school classroom - YouTube

Nadine Sheahan's insight:

This is an introductory video about the use of Google Apps in a primary school setting. The video discusses a number of uses for the system and I can see the benefits for both students and teachers. 

 

Here are some of the uses I found most interesting:

 

- students’ have the ability to communicate with other students safely and securely via email. The system has a filter which does not allow students to send emails if they have used inappropriate language. I find that to be rather helpful, as the use of inappropriate language can often be a concern for student communication, particularly online. 

 

-  Google Apps also allows students to create websites. The video explains how this can benefit student learning through the use of sharing information and providing feedback to their peers. Part of the Australian Curriculum: Digital Technologies for year three and four requires students to investigate how information systems are used in communities and explain what needs are being met. Students have the opportunity to investigate how their websites are used as part of their classroom community and provide feedback to their peers about how other's website meets their learning needs. Students can then use this feedback to adjust their websites. 

 

- Google Docs is another aspect of Google Apps for education that I found quite interesting. I had heard about it last year in the EDC3100 ICT course, but I didn't familiarise myself with its uses. Google Docs provides students with their own storage area online. It also allows them to share documents with others. The video discussed how it could be used for the purpose of homework, which made homework more engaging for students and made it easier for the teacher to mark. I thought this was quite an interesting approach particularly in relation to homework. Personally, I think it could be an invaluable tool. Students would be able to keep all of their homework in one place, it would be accessible anywhere,  students are able to receive the teachers help instantaneously if both parties are online and students would be more engaged and less likely to lose their homework. 

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