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Programme, Project and Change Management
Wisdom, experience, information, ideas and thoughts gathered from the web on business programme, project and change management.
Curated by Harry Cannon
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Rescooped by Harry Cannon from The Science and Art of Motivation
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Kotter Change Communication Gap > One-Way Traffic Doesn't Motivate Change

Kotter Change Communication Gap > One-Way Traffic Doesn't Motivate Change | Programme, Project and Change Management | Scoop.it

For the past 20 years, corporate communication specialists have tried as hard as they can to tailor the message to the frontline... Unfortunately, this violates the Platinum Rule of Organizational Change:


Change is a threat when done to me,but an opportunity when done by me.


Managers often say, "but when I get everyone together to hear their perspective, it devolves into a complaint session." This brings us back to the Golden Rule of Organizational Change:

If you're not getting the response you need, 
change the stimulus. (YOU)


...this means "ask better questions" and/or structure your meetings to move beyond the complaints to a constructive place.


- See more at: http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/07/kotter-change-commuication-gap.html?utm_medium=facebook&utm_source=twitterfeed#sthash.HP9c7pKP.dpuf


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Harry Cannon's insight:

Managers need facilitation skills, a clear purpose and an honest ear.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 30, 2013 7:06 AM

If the meetings are structured by those without participative change expertise, the results may be what is described on Ron's change website.


Involvement and engagement is not for the inexperienced with process tools and results.  

Those who ARE deeply experienced with vision, strategy, project development and execution may NOT have the expertise for engaging in a to z two-way communication
 through all stages, to overcome the low success rate with change inititatives.


 ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 30, 2013 7:10 AM

Participative processes throughout a project make a huge difference here.  See the next  post for an example of the new and changing management structures for how and why.  


(Originally posted on the Science of Motivation curation stream.) 


~  D


PS:  If you are in an organization that uses yearly performance appraisals, that may be a big indicator of the problem.

Rescooped by Harry Cannon from Change Management Resources
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Cure Your Company's Allergy to Change, Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield Examples

Cure Your Company's Allergy to Change, Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield Examples | Programme, Project and Change Management | Scoop.it

"The HBR post cites several case studies illustrating why many transformations fizzle, then two examples for how to turn it around."

 

Excerpted:

 

______________________

   

But they're not failing fast to learn. They're just failing more. It's definitely not a learning organization.

______________________

 

A health insurer demonstrates a repeated pattern of 3- to 5-year cycles where it launches a change program, takes awhile for managers to get behind it, and then more time to get it funded. A program gets funded for a year but then everyone loses interest, and it gets defunded and dies.

 

Recently they're failing faster; the three- to five-year cycle is moving to two to three years. But they're not failing fast to learn. They're just failing more. It's definitely not a learning organization.

 

Just about everyone in the company agrees the culture is dysfunctional:

   

Some point to politics - competition between the COO and CFO blocking each other's progress.  The CEO also had a way of questioning and stress-testing people that discouraged risk-taking => a "play it safe" mentality. Executives who want quick wins scope projects to be done in a year. Most change programs there needed multiple years, so by the time a program extends beyond year one, executives move onto a new initiative.

 

What countermeasures are there to break a tragic change cycle like this?

 

______________________

   

Adopting improvement methods such as "agile" or "lean" can change the culture so that results and trust are prized over process and contracts.

______________________

 

Successful efforts at health insurance companies Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan offer insights:

 

Organizational realignment — The structure of an organization determines the incentives that drive identity, behavior, and employee understanding of roles and responsibilities and priorities, as well as a sense of ownership and accountability.

 

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan's tried a more traditional functional management structure but then found it lost customer focus.

  

It appointed leaders to run market segments with profit and loss responsibility with the focus of changing the product mix and improve profitability.  By organizing by customer, cross-functional changes became much easier to implement, and there was a dramatic turnaround in business results.    

Improvement methods — a platform for doing work nimbly and at low cost included:

  

Adopting improvement methods such as "agile" or "lean" can change the culture as employees are empowered  so that results and trust are prized over process and contracts.  Tactics such as daily huddles drove immediate wins and helped entrench a culture of empowerment.

 

Employee engagement — Employees fundamentally want themselves and the company to be successful, so successful change agents listen to their needs and help them transition.

 

Aetna describes how new CEO John Rowe and the senior team "sought out employees at all levels — those who were well connected, sensitive to the company culture, and widely respected — to get their input on the strategy, design and execution of intended process changes."

 

Executives at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan went into the field to gather input and communicate their commitment to change. Employees were trained in improvement methods ("Lean"), with every employee going through two sessions in accountability training.

 



Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Harry Cannon's comment, November 1, 2012 8:30 AM
See article in HBR Jul-Aug 2012 by Katzenback et al.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, November 3, 2012 5:10 PM
Thanks Harry. I appreciate the link.