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Programme, Project and Change Management
Wisdom, experience, information, ideas and thoughts gathered from the web on business programme, project and change management.
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Rescooped by Harry Cannon from The Science and Art of Motivation
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Kotter Change Communication Gap > One-Way Traffic Doesn't Motivate Change

Kotter Change Communication Gap > One-Way Traffic Doesn't Motivate Change | Programme, Project and Change Management | Scoop.it

For the past 20 years, corporate communication specialists have tried as hard as they can to tailor the message to the frontline... Unfortunately, this violates the Platinum Rule of Organizational Change:


Change is a threat when done to me,but an opportunity when done by me.


Managers often say, "but when I get everyone together to hear their perspective, it devolves into a complaint session." This brings us back to the Golden Rule of Organizational Change:

If you're not getting the response you need, 
change the stimulus. (YOU)


...this means "ask better questions" and/or structure your meetings to move beyond the complaints to a constructive place.


- See more at: http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/07/kotter-change-commuication-gap.html?utm_medium=facebook&utm_source=twitterfeed#sthash.HP9c7pKP.dpuf


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Harry Cannon's insight:

Managers need facilitation skills, a clear purpose and an honest ear.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 30, 2013 10:06 AM

If the meetings are structured by those without participative change expertise, the results may be what is described on Ron's change website.


Involvement and engagement is not for the inexperienced with process tools and results.  

Those who ARE deeply experienced with vision, strategy, project development and execution may NOT have the expertise for engaging in a to z two-way communication
 through all stages, to overcome the low success rate with change inititatives.


 ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 30, 2013 10:10 AM

Participative processes throughout a project make a huge difference here.  See the next  post for an example of the new and changing management structures for how and why.  


(Originally posted on the Science of Motivation curation stream.) 


~  D


PS:  If you are in an organization that uses yearly performance appraisals, that may be a big indicator of the problem.

Rescooped by Harry Cannon from Change Management Resources
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3 Key Partners in Change Management Execution

3 Key  Partners in Change Management Execution | Programme, Project and Change Management | Scoop.it

There are three basic key players in strategy execution: the leader, the program manager and the change management lead.

What if we partnered?

It all starts at the beginning.

 

....It might open productive conversations and whole new working relationships with them. They may want to negotiate a few parameters in the beginning to get comfortable with this dynamic, but that should be quite achievable.

 
Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Harry Cannon's insight:

Collaboration in programme change. Why is this not the norm yet?

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 19, 2013 4:54 PM

Great stuff from Gail on execution success focused on roles & relationships => partnering to deliver & sustain.  ~  Deb

Rescooped by Harry Cannon from Change Management Resources
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Getting Stronger through Stress: Making Black Swans Work for You

Getting Stronger through Stress: Making Black Swans Work for You | Programme, Project and Change Management | Scoop.it

"...our focus in modern times on removing or minimizing randomness has actually had the perverse effect of increasing fragility."



Excerpts - Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: 


...we all need to find ways to harness the power of randomness, volatility and extreme events to help us grow and develop more of our potential.

 

Focusing on Black Swans

 

Nassim Nicholas Taleb writes about black swans [including] three books: Fooled by Randomness, The Black Swan and, now, Antifragile.


Black Swans, in Taleb’s parlance, are “large-scale unpredictable and irregular events of massive consequence.’


The latest book focuses on approaches that enable us to thrive from high levels of volatility, and particularly those unexpected extreme events.

It...willl...prove infuriating to most of our economic, educational and political elites, for he argues that these elites have played a major role in making us increasingly vulnerable to volatility and Black Swans.


...The quest for antifragility

The real opportunity, in Taleb’s view, is to learn and grow from volatility and unexpected events – not to return to where you were, but to become even better as a result of the exposure and experience.   

 

He makes an important point: biological systems in nature are inherently antifragile – they are constantly evolving and growing stronger as a result of random events. In contrast, man-made systems tend to be fragile, they are the ones that have a hard time coping with random events.  


Taleb highlights a key paradox: our focus in modern times on removing or minimizing randomness has actually had the perverse effect of increasing fragility.


Related posts by Deb:


3 Things That Cause Ethical Breakdowns in Workplace Culture: Timing a Reminder is Everything   Agile Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through the Sharp Rocks   Strategic Agility: Adapting to Now & Next

   


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Harry Cannon's insight:

Are we becoming too risk averse, in projects and society? We seem less tolerant of failure, which makes us less able to deal with the setbacks that do occur.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 8, 2013 2:28 PM

Resilience, Robustness? - Nope.  The blog author references another author who uses nature to describe "Antifragility."   I see a parallel with the concept of Agile systems, including learning agility and "unlearning."  ~  Deb


Photo credit:  by Tamsin Slater, Flickr CC

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 10, 2013 2:00 PM

This post was originally Scooped in Agile Learning.  It also seems a very useful perspective for Change Management Resources with the concept "Anti-Fragile" compared to resilience and resistance.  ~  Deb


Photo credit:  By Tamsin Slater

Rescooped by Harry Cannon from Change Management Resources
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The Irony of Empowerment in Change: Kotter Theory vs. Practice

The Irony of Empowerment in Change:  Kotter Theory vs. Practice | Programme, Project and Change Management | Scoop.it

As I thought about Push in the context of Kotter's model, I imagined the table you see above.  

In most "less than successful" change projects, the Tops drive steps 1, 2, and 3.  Step 4 is the Tops using HR or Communication to PUSH "their" change downhill.  


________________________

I found it ironic that what Kotter envisioned as empowerment is often the stage where resistance takes over.________________________

Because participation is normally restricted in steps 1, 2, and 3, the Middles & Bottoms lack ownership.  People support what they help create.  People do NOT support what they do NOT help create.  
I looked at Phillip's (McKinsey early 80s) change management model and thought about Kotter's 8 steps.  This is what it looks like to me:  

- See more at: http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/05/kotter-theory-vs-practice.html#sthash.04w2HumJ.dpuf


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Harry Cannon's insight:

I like Kotter, but any approach can be misused I guess.

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Harry Cannon's comment, July 30, 2013 3:59 AM
Perhaps some see Kotter's steps as a formula? Follow the steps and it will work. But missing the poont about real and honest engagement and listening.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 30, 2013 10:12 AM
Yes, Harry, exactly! There are also communication problems in being too formulaic, Ron's companion post just added.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 7, 2013 11:17 AM

Ron has a helpful series on understanding how to fully use a change model for change leadership.  Both he and I are of the "Whole Scale Change" school of engagement for change, via the late Kathie Dannemiller, a respected consultant formerly from Ford and the University of Michigan. 

Ownership and productive tension of leadership at all levels can make a real different if change readiness and culture change are in the context of what is next and needed for your organization.


From Change Management Resources ~  Deb

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Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools)

Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools) | Programme, Project and Change Management | Scoop.it

"Just 30 percent of these tools deliver as intended. Why?  ...They’re misused by most organizations."


As Jeremy Hope and Steve Player reveal in Beyond Performance Management, while many tools are sound in theory, they’re misused by most organizations. 

For example, executives buy and implement a tool without first asking,

"What problem are we trying to solve?”  

And they use tools to command and control frontline teams, not empower them—a serious and costly mistake.
 

Issue No. 251 of Your Weekly Staff Meeting highlights a new book from Harvard Business Review Press on how to select the right management tool—at the right time. The authors describe 40 tools in detail.

Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Harry Cannon's insight:

Sounds like one to read. Certainly seen tools misunderstood and mis-used.

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Suchitra Mishra's curator insight, July 1, 2013 11:15 PM

Anyone who has led an ERP system implementation will be nodding her head along with this interesting 2 in one post - a book review + author's insight into tools and change management....

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 2, 2013 4:45 PM
I'm 1/3rd into this book and it is REALLY on target. Great resource. Thanks for the comments from Suchitra and Harry. I so agree with the "not doing may be smarter" based on a solid review of what the needs and problems are.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 29, 2013 3:47 PM
Ok, I've about finished the book. It does contribute in many helpful ways to breaking out of industrial mindsets that hamper creativity, innovation and collaboration sorely needed in organizational thinking today. It is a helpful checklist for assessing blind spots and "keeping up with the joneses" when such "best practices" in corporate measurement and reporting are not necessary and, even worse, a drain on productivity. Highly recommended!