Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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8 Things Kids should Be Able to Do with Technology ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

8 Things Kids should Be Able to Do with Technology ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"I just came across this graphic on Twitter and it straightforward picked my interest. I was contemplating the deep meaning it communicates and could not agree more. The message is clear: technology is a means and not an end.

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Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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Deep learning with Google tools: 20 ideas via @MattMiller

Deep learning with Google tools: 20 ideas via @MattMiller | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Packaging the abilities of several Google tools together can lead to deep learning around a single topic. Here are some ideas.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Energy and Calm: Brain Breaks and Focused-Attention Practices

Energy and Calm: Brain Breaks and Focused-Attention Practices | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
When presented with new material, standards, and complicated topics, we need to be focused and calm as we approach our assignments. We can use brain breaks and focused-attention practices to positively impact our emotional states and learning. They refocus our neural circuitry with either stimulating or quieting practices that generate increased activity in the prefrontal cortex, where problem solving and emotional regulation occur.
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5 Must Read Books On The Science of Learning

5 Must Read Books On The Science of Learning | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Learning is a complex cognitive phenomena that has been and is still the central theme of a wide variety of scientific studies. The overarching question ‘how we learn what we learn’ intrigued scientists across different disciplines and generated tons of literature on the topic. Informative insights coming out of these studies have not only demystified the workings of human cognition but have also shaped pedagogy and teaching methodology in unprecedented ways (e.g. multiple intelligence theory and learning styles). In this month's Books for Teachers, we are sharing with you five popular books on the topic of learning. You may want to bookmark and save them to read in your upcoming vacation. Enjoy
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, September 27, 10:46 AM
Old time technology called writing and reading offers some food for thought with these books.
Virgínia Mareco's comment, September 27, 4:46 PM
http://booksliteraryreviews.blogspot.pt/2016/07/the-book-on-mediums-o-livros-dos.html
Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, September 27, 11:33 PM
If you have some spare time (!) and are looking for some professional reading, then this list will be helpful.
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Putting the FORM in Formative Assessment

Putting the FORM in Formative Assessment | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Formative assessment works best when students understand what their learning looks like. Here are some guidelines for making it fun, organic, relevant, and meaningful.
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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, September 27, 11:34 PM
From one of my favourite regular reads, this post is about how to create meaningful formative assessment.
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Report - What Works Best reflection guide

"The What Works Best reflection guide is a practical resource for teachers and school executive staff. It gives schools explicit examples of what can be done to improve student engagement and achievement. Teachers can use this guide to reflect on their individual teaching strategies and to evaluate their own practice. The themes discussed can also be implemented through a whole-school approach.


Drawing on the evidence presented in CESE’s publications What works best: Evidence-based practices to help improve NSW student performance; Six Effective Practices in High Growth Schools; Student Wellbeing and Tell Them From Me case studies; this guide assists school staff to reflect on what’s working in their schools and what can be improved. "

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How to Infuse the Arts Into Core Curriculum (and Why It Matters)

How to Infuse the Arts Into Core Curriculum (and Why It Matters) | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
At School 21, each secondary-level PBL unit is co-taught by a content teacher and an arts teacher. I usually pair up with a history teacher. When I first encounter content from a humanities curriculum, I don't think about the list of names or dates that the students need to learn. With my background in professional theatre, I instinctively think about the stories that exist within the content. Approaching the content like an artist, I think about how I would bring this idea alive in the real world with an ensemble. How will I make it matter to my students? Using theatre in this way not only gives the students stories to which they can emotionally attach knowledge, but by turning these stories into theatre productions, we provide students with a world in which their knowledge lives on after the life of their play.

To learn content is one thing, but to fuse it with a challenging form of art compels students to research it, know it, and be it enough to reinterpret and communicate it. This practice brings an enjoyable, engaging process with high outcomes. In a time when schools are tossing aside the arts, I think we must realise that if we place art at the centre of our curriculum, the learning environment transforms classrooms into stages and galleries, facts into stories, and memories into legacies.

If you want to bring art into your classroom, I offer these suggestions as a starting point.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, September 29, 9:33 AM
I can envision how these thoughts can be utilized in many classrooms. Thematic lessons and project based learning immediately come to mind. Bring the art, music, and tech teachers into your collaborative planning sessions and allow the creativity juices to flow.
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Brains in Pain Cannot Learn! - @Edutopia

Brains in Pain Cannot Learn! - @Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

E"ducators and students are carrying in much more than backpacks, car keys, conversations, partially-completed homework, and outward laughter. Buried deep in the brain's limbic system is an emotional switching station called the amygdala, and it is here that our human survival and emotional messages are subconsciously prioritized and learned. We continually scan environments for feelings of connectedness and safety. I am learning that the students who look oppositional, defiant, or aloof may be exhibiting negative behavior because they are in pain and presenting their stress response.

Over 29 percent of young people in the U.S., ages 9-17, are affected by anxiety and depression disorders (PDF). The thinking lobes in the prefrontal cortex shut down when a brain is in pain."

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Printable Upper and Lowercase Alphabet Puzzles | From ABCs to ACTs

Printable Upper and Lowercase Alphabet Puzzles | From ABCs to ACTs | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"We’ve obviously spent quite a bit of time over the past few months, learning the letters of the alphabet in our home preschool.

What with creating our alphabet book, working our way through our Spot & Dot pages, and even enjoying some basic coloring in our alphabet coloring book, I think it’s safe to say that we’ve gotten plenty of practice in."

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7 Tips for Creating an Irresistible Curriculum - Fractus Learning

7 Tips for Creating an Irresistible Curriculum - Fractus Learning | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Every student has made this claim at least once before. As students make their way through their academic career, they often question the importance and applicability of their lessons. It is not only evident in this common statement, but also in the many blank stares and falling heads as students fall asleep. Is our content doomed to boredom? How can we present it so that students are excited to learn?

Below, I will share with you some questions to ask yourself to help you create a curriculum that students will not be able to get enough of!
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, September 16, 6:03 AM
Asking yourself these questions before and during planning is the appropriate action if you truly want your lessons to be effective for your students.
Patricia Thomson's curator insight, September 20, 5:14 AM

A few sensible tips.

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TED Talks: Education Revolution | PBS Programs | PBS

TED Talks: Education Revolution | PBS Programs | PBS | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"TED Talks: Education Revolution focuses on how education is changing to adapt to our new digital world, examining what the classroom might look like in the future and the impact of online teaching, with talks from innovators in the field of education."


Premieres on PBS Tuesday, September 13th!

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Take A Deep Dive Into Content Areas | Professional Development

Take A Deep Dive Into Content Areas | Professional Development | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Our expertly curated collections of content encourage you to look closely, ask questions, make connections to your own practice, and learn from and alongside inspiring educators and thought leaders.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, September 12, 9:01 AM
TeachingChannel.org is always one of my "go to" resources but this "Deep Dives" feature is an absolute awesome resource. I found value in each of the categories: Setting Up Your Classroom; Class Culture; New Teacher Survival Guide; Growth Mindset, etc.  New learning for me: Teaching From the Walls and Supply Area for Each Student Desk Configuration. Too many to mention all.
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The Greatest Resource Available to Teachers - Fractus Learning

The Greatest Resource Available to Teachers - Fractus Learning | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
I am not great at marketing. It is not where my strengths as a writer lie. But I have discovered an amazing resource for teachers that I cannot keep to myself. I am here today to tell you about a resource that will improve your teaching overnight. Even new teachers will be able to see instant results as they draw on years of accumulated experience.

It doesn’t matter where you teach, what you teach or whom you teach: If you are a teacher, you need to know about this incredible resource. I guarantee it will change your life as a teacher! This invaluable resource is overlooked by so many but should not be ignored by any teacher. What is it, you ask?

The greatest resource available to teachers must be expensive, surely. Perhaps it is a glossy, import quality textbook? Perhaps it is an intensive course of training that will take months of your time and great effort? Or perhaps it is some service you must subscribe to and pay monthly fees for? In fact, it is none of these things. The greatest resource available to teachers is…

Teachers. That’s right: other teachers.

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Victor Ventura's curator insight, September 10, 8:27 AM
A Professional Learning Community is invaluable!
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An Educational Debate: 10 Progressive vs. Traditional Teaching Ideas by @mraspinall

An Educational Debate: 10 Progressive vs. Traditional Teaching Ideas by @mraspinall | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
I want to start this post by admitting progressive teaching has nothing (per se) to do with technology. Instead it is a pedagogical shift in the teacher’s mind. Yup – I used the word pedagogical. For those who know me, I’m not a fan of the word, but it applies here.

Do I consider myself a progressive teacher? As often as possible. Do I consider myself a traditional teacher? Sure, sometimes. If we were to construct a giant Venn diagram I’d be in the middle – somewhat.
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365 Creative Writing Prompts - ThinkWritten

365 Creative Writing Prompts - ThinkWritten | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
If you want to become a better writer, the best thing you can do is practice writing every single day. But we know sometimes it can be hard to think of what to write about! So we put together this list of 365 creative writing prompts to give you something to write about daily. Whether you write short stories, poems, or like to keep a journal – these will stretch your imagination and give you some ideas on what to write about!
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, September 29, 12:10 PM

Prompts are useful. I'm more comfortable using writing prompts if I know my students can generate a prompt of their own.  One way to promote this skills is to always offer students the option to come up with their own prompt.

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Got Calm? 3 Tech Tools That Make it Easy for Educators to Try Mindfulness - Fractus Learning

Got Calm? 3 Tech Tools That Make it Easy for Educators to Try Mindfulness - Fractus Learning | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Traditionally, mindfulness has been taught, learned and practiced through independent self-study or through working with an expert. But these days, new technology solutions are springing up to help parents, teachers and other caring adults more easily share mindfulness with children. And while there has been some pushback from the community regarding the efficacy of digital mindfulness tools, there’s no arguing with the fact that by leveraging technology, a wider and more diverse generation of folks are gaining access to the benefits of mindfulness.

Wondering what all the hype is about? Here are three technology solutions that will give you a taste of what mindfulness can do for you and the young people in your life:
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An Appeal to My Child’s Kindergarten Teacher

An Appeal to My Child’s Kindergarten Teacher | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Educators face challenges, funding issues, and problems beyond their control. But for each student and family, it’s all about the relationship they will have with their child's teacher.
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Why Educators Must Innovate #IMMOOC - Leading, Learning, Questioning

Why Educators Must Innovate #IMMOOC - Leading, Learning, Questioning | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Here’s my worry: Schools that don’t innovate are going to look like this, and it likely won’t take 15 years to happen. In all likelihood, it’s probably happening more places than we’d like to admit right now.

If we don’t change, we’re going to end up looking like that picture appears to us now–irrelevant, a relic of the past. For some (maybe even many) what we were doing now will be nearly unrecognizable in the not so distant future. In hindsight, some of what we understood as best practice not too long ago seems that way.

We can’t control the fact that our schools will continue to grow, but if we don’t start getting some movement now and gaining momentum today, we’re going to end up so big and so settled in that our own inertia will keep us from moving forward. With each day that passes without innovation, we only make it harder to make change happen in the future.
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GwynethJones's curator insight, September 26, 7:06 AM

Change matters. Innovation happens, with purpose.

Victor Ventura's curator insight, September 26, 9:02 AM
Whatever it takes to be effective is on the board for discussion and use. Innovation doesn't necessarily mean new! Public School Education, as we know it, is at a crossroad. It is crucial that all parties involved, be ready and willing to meet the expectations of our communities.
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8 Reflective Questions To Help Any Student Think About Their Learning - TeachThought

8 Reflective Questions To Help Any Student Think About Their Learning - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Why the brain actually benefits from reflection is a matter of neurology, but the extensive research is clear: Prediction, reflection, and metacognition are pillars for the thoughtful classroom. The questions below were created to be, as much as possible, useful with most students at most ages and grade levels with a little rewording.

Perhaps most crucially, by shifting their reflection from content to thought, students have the chance to put themselves back at the center of the learning process. When they reflect, students reimagine what happened in both 1st and 3rd person–as they were seen, and as they saw through their own eyes. How? A sample response for a 7th or 8th grader might be:

I guess I was most creative today when we were given a chance to create our own metaphors for the ways rain forests help the planet “breathe.” Why? Maybe because it forced me to think about something visually, which meant we could come up with our own answers! 

In reflecting, the student had to think both about their own feelings (when they felt something), and how they might be perceived (what others might consider ‘creative’).
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Helen Teague's curator insight, September 24, 8:14 AM
great scoop on the importance and power of reflection
Victor Ventura's curator insight, September 24, 8:55 AM
Prediction, Reflection, and Metacognition. We can make this a regular practice in any grade level classroom. These questions and others can provide the pathway.
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14 ways to create great classroom video with Screencastify

14 ways to create great classroom video with Screencastify | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"One of my favorite classroom video creation tools is Screencastify. It’s a Chrome extension … a little program installed into the Google Chrome web browser in the top right corner.

I love it because you can:

* record video with your webcam OR record what’s happening on your screen. 


* record a specific web browser tab, the entire web browser or your computer’s desktop. 


* choose between cameras and microphones if you have more than one plugged in. 


* include the system audio (sounds the computer makes) or turn them off. 


* upload directly to Google Drive or YouTube"

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Making Math Meaningful with Virtual Math Manipulatives

Making Math Meaningful with Virtual Math Manipulatives | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Use the real world to teach without the mess of physical manipulatives. In brief, virtual math manipulatives are powerful tools for math teachers everywhere. On the whole, many teachers don’t understand how to use them. So, today, you’ll get a simple tour of virtual math manipulatives from expert David Wees.
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Horse Algebra Goes Viral! - @DaveBurgess

Horse Algebra Goes Viral! - @DaveBurgess | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
When a math problem goes completely viral on the internet…I sit up and pay attention. This is an absolutely amazing problem to spark a math discussion in  your class. It looks deceptively simple. Let me tell you something…it isn’t! Don’t get overconfident! Take your time and give it a shot right now!
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8 Basic Steps Of Project-Based Learning To Get You Started - TeachThought

8 Basic Steps Of Project-Based Learning To Get You Started - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
The process of designing and implementing project-based learning can be fairly complex. A big part of that complexity is the shift toward inquiry that uncovers learning as you use PBL to flip Bloom’s Taxonomy. With that said, it’s often helpful to break this process down into basic steps to help teachers and schools get started with the caveat that PBL planning and implementation is not a simple, linear process. Readers should keep in mind that some of these “steps” can occur simultaneously as the reality of the messiness of learning and planning for deeper learning kicks in.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, September 16, 5:58 AM
The PBL Chart and the description are helpful, but it made me realize that PD is this area would be necessary for me to implement it in my classroom.
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Refreshing your on- and offline spaces with a bit of library eye candy — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch

Refreshing your on- and offline spaces with a bit of library eye candy — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"There’s redecorating and there’s just plain old decorating.


When it comes time for a bit of library refreshing, in the form of posters and bulletin boards, there are so many wonderful shared options. In the spirit of fall refreshing, I thought I’d refresh on of my posts, Fall decorating: a round-up of smart (and free) posters, from a few years back.


As I mentioned back then, every year, as we move back into our libraries and classrooms, we search for meaningful, inspiring, attractive visuals to fill our display cases, to grace our bulletin boards, to embed on our websites and most importantly, to engage and inspire those who visit."

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Tracey Robertson's curator insight, September 12, 5:56 AM
Thank you this is very helpful.
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Favorite Portals for Pedagogical Planning (and a new curation tool) — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch

Favorite Portals for Pedagogical Planning (and a new curation tool) — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
In prepping for my on-campus course this semester I felt the need to freshen up my face-to-face discussion strategies. Digging around, I discovered some fabulous pedagogical portals well worth visiting for educators, both newbie and veteran.  Take a look if you and your partner teachers seek a little inspiration for engaging learners in meaningful conversations and a few new activities.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, September 12, 9:09 AM
Great Resource, so many valuable resources. Check out, Cult of Pedagogy and one particular activity, "How to Play Crumple and Shoot."
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Study Says Making Art Reduces Stress, Even If You Kind Of Suck At It

Study Says Making Art Reduces Stress, Even If You Kind Of Suck At It | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
The next time you’re blessed with that familiar, overwhelming sensation of stress — when your anxieties turn from passing sensations in the brain to rude house guests overstaying their welcome — I highly recommend breaking out your construction paper, model clay, glitter glue, feathers and pipe cleaners. 

“I’m not an artist!” you might protest, recalling the ambivalent grin your parents flashed while hanging your elementary school masterpiece on the refrigerator all those years ago. But, no matter. Honestly, it does not matter. Science says so. 

More specifically, Girija Kaimal, assistant professor of creative arts therapies at Drexel University, says so. Kaimal recently led a study examining the effects of making art on stress-related hormones in your body.

The results, published in Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, titled “Reduction of Cortisol Levels and Participants’ Responses Following Art Making,” found that 45 minutes of creative activity significantly lessens stress in the body, regardless of artistic experience or talent.
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Karine Buriez's curator insight, September 14, 6:26 AM
Une étude montre que pratiquer une activité artistique réduit le stress, même chez les personnes qui n'ont pas d'expérience ni talent particulier.