Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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A Day In The Life Of A Connected Educator - Edudemic

A Day In The Life Of A Connected Educator - Edudemic | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Being a connected educator may be one of the newest but most important things a teacher should know about.
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Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Professional learning in a glance (or two)!
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New Teachers: How to Talk to Parents @Edutopia

New Teachers: How to Talk to Parents @Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

“"You don’t have kids, do you?” a parent asked me during my early years of teaching. She was right: I had no children at the time. I was offended, however, by the implication that my lack of progeny inevitably meant that my advice must be useless.

But it was.

It wasn’t my lack of children that made my advice useless. It was the fact that I had derived a solution to the problem (her child never turning in homework) that would work well in my world—not hers.

I’m not saying teachers need to be parents to be good communicators. We need to be empathetic. If I had thought more about what it was like to work three jobs (which I did in college) and try to carve out meaningful time to spend with the people you care about, I would have given that single mom completely different advice.

Over the years, I feel like I’ve improved at communicating with parents as I’ve made bigger efforts to put myself in their shoes. Here are the main things I’ve learned."

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10  Good Strategies to Foster A Growth Mindset Culture in Your Class

10  Good Strategies to Foster A Growth Mindset Culture in Your Class | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
In her celebrated book ‘Mindset: The New Psychology of Success’, Stanford university psychologist Carol S. Dweck makes a strong case backed up with  scientific evidence for the power of mindset in shaping one’s success or failure in almost every facet of our life.Those with a fixed mindset mentality tend to be limited in their learning scope believing that their inner traits and abilities are biologically determined. On the other hand, people with a growth mindset embrace change and tend to learn more from life experiences because for them concepts such as skills, abilities and competencies are not fixated  and can be developed through a process of error and trial.

In today’s post, we are sharing with you this handy infographic we created based on Marcus Guido’s post ’10 Ways Teachers Can Instill a Growth Mindset in Students’. Guido walks you through the different strategies you can use with your students to cultivate a growth mindset in your class and ultimately enhance students learning.  Read his post to learn more about each of the strategies featured here.
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Tina Jameson's curator insight, March 23, 6:01 PM
Nice visual to support concept of developing a 'Growth Mindset' in the classroom.
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An Interesting Infographic Featuring 20 of The Best YouTube Channels for Math Teachers

An Interesting Infographic Featuring 20 of The Best YouTube Channels for Math Teachers | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Below is an infographic we created for the post we published last week featuring some of the best YouTube channels for Math teachers. 'These channels provide a wide variety of videos, tutorials and animated courses covering different mathematical concepts from Algebra to Geometry.'"


Via Maria Margarida Correia
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, March 19, 10:14 AM
Good resource to check out.
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Getting Creative With Video in the Classroom @JonathanWylie

Getting Creative With Video in the Classroom @JonathanWylie | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
While watching the Oscars tonight, I was intrigued to see a promotion that Walmart was running to celebrate the craft of film making. I don’t normally pay a lot of attention to  commercials, but these ads managed to catch my attention, and I think that they have some interesting potential for teachers who are looking to add some creativity to video projects in their classroom.

Walmart contacted four award-winning directors, Seth Rogan and Evan Goldberg (Superbad, Neighbors), Antoine Fuqua (Southpaw, The Magnificent Seven), and Marc Forster (Monster’s Ball, The Kite Runner). They sent each of them a receipt with the same six items and challenged them to make a one minute movie that was centered around the six items on the receipt. You can learn more here, but take a look at the videos below to see what these talented directors came up with…
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10 Excellent Educational Websites for High School Students

10 Excellent Educational Websites for High School Students | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

Via Skip Zalneraitis
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Google Image Search Tips via Educators' Technology

Google Image Search Tips via Educators' Technology | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, March 19, 9:20 PM

Good stuff! Thanks to Filomena Gomes.

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5 Team Building Games That Can Teach Critical Thinking Skills

5 Team Building Games That Can Teach Critical Thinking Skills | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Team building games offer students fun opportunities to hone critical skills for success in the modern workplace. Students (and future employees!) that value teamwork are more motivated and creative. They’re also better at problem solving and communicating with one another and have a higher level of trust. We already know students love working in groups. Why not make a game of it?"


Via Chris Carter
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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 14, 8:05 AM
Here are 5 team building games to try out with your students that also develop critical thinking skills. Collaboration and team spirit await you!

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Gamification

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Gaming

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Critical-Thinking

 

 

Oskar Almazan's curator insight, March 14, 8:21 AM
Team building games offer students fun opportunities to hone critical skills for success in the modern workplace. Students (and future employees!) that value teamwork are more motivated and creative. They’re also better at problem solving and communicating with one another and have a higher level of trust. We already know students love working in groups. Why not make a game of it?
Andrea Mejia Medina's curator insight, March 18, 12:10 AM
Critical thinking is the most important skill to develop, since in these times of information at hand, we cannot believe everything we see, read, and hear, and that is why it is important to develop this ability as it allows us to be alert and question everything that comes from these means of information. Is a skill that moves a student from concrete ideas to abstract and inferred concepts. Critical thinking allows us to analyze outcomes, compare ideas, identify parallels, sequence events, synthesize information and draw conclusions from a given body of knowledge. Whether it is the proof behind a mathematics formula or an implied tone in an essay, critical thinking skills enable students to solve problems in the real world and on exams in school. Meghan Moll (2014) suggests five tools to develop the critical thinking skills necessary for success on every high school or college test and assignment. 1. Brain games: Recently, websites dedicated to training your brain have enjoyed increased popularity. Lumosity, for example, provides games that aid in improving memory and problem-solving. From timed matching games to order sequence memorization, websites like this can aid in cognition and the ability to ask, "What is the next step?" This skill is critical to learning how to approach complex problems on standardized tests like the ACT and SAT. Rather than playing time-wasting games when you have a lull in your day, search online for brain teasers and peruse the plethora of brain games at your fingertips. 2. Logic puzzles: Before the Internet, puzzles intended to exercise your brain were published in books. Collections of crossword puzzles, logic problems, riddles, sudoku, word problems and word searches can be found at your local bookstore or library. The puzzles in these books are a wonderful strategy to activate different parts of your brain for a round or two of mental gymnastics, and many collections even discuss what each puzzle is meant to target within the mind. 3. Board games: This suggestion may seem strange at first, but do not balk. Choose board games that require more than luck – namely, strategy – for players to win. Any game where players must carefully consider their next move, recognize patterns and remember details will aid in honing critical thinking skills. Certain games like Rubik’s Cube are single-player, while others involve multiple people. Checkers, chess and Mastermind are two-player games that challenge you to plan several steps ahead. Games like Boggle and Scrabble require analyzing information quickly and formulating words, while Clue and Risk test and strengthen your ability to anticipate and react to others’ moves, as well as infer motives. 4. Journaling: Daily reflection – such as maintaining a journal – is a simple way to revisit your day, but it is also a fantastic opportunity to explore ideas. Writing encourages you to expand upon your thoughts and form connections. A journal forces you to slow down and focus on just one or two ideas at a time, which hectic schedules don't otherwise allow. Use your journal to record important ideas and questions and narratives about your life. 5. Book clubs: Students who read for understanding find it far easier to think critically than those who rush to finish. Analyzing a book requires you to delve deeper and ponder complex questions. When reading, think about why the book was written the way it was, what motivates certain characters, and how plot developments may be symbols of foreshadowing. Locate a book club to hone these skills. You will read works you otherwise may not have, and you will learn to examine character development, plot, symbolism and a whole host of other features.
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22 Free yet Overlooked Online Teaching Tools for Teachers

22 Free yet Overlooked Online Teaching Tools for Teachers | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Teachers need help from right resources, tools and apps to make work easier and faster. Here are 22 free tools that teachers must use for their classes.

Via Cyndi Danner-Kuhn
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How to lead a brainstorm - TED.Ed

How to lead a brainstorm - TED.Ed | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Brainstorming was invented in the 1930s as a practical idea-generation technique for regular use by “creatives” within the ad agency BBDO. The skill began to gain a wider audience in 1942, when Alex Osborn — the “O” in BBDO — released a book called How to Think Up and sparked the imaginations of his fellow Mad Men.
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5 TED talks to watch when you're having a bad day - Business Insider

5 TED talks to watch when you're having a bad day - Business Insider | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
You're having one of those days when nothing seems to be going right.

It seems like the world is out to get you, and now you find that you've fallen into a major emotional funk.

What can you do? Resign yourself to getting crabbier and more despondent by the second -- and thus turn your bad day into a bad week?

No way. Instead, watch one (or all!) of these inspiring, feel-good TED Talks — and prepare for your bad day to turn right around.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, March 15, 8:23 AM
Don't wait for a bad day, test the waters one afternoon when you are waiting for the kids to get home or even when you are preparing supper. If it helps, then save the others for truly bad days
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14 Must-Read Anti-Bullying Books for Kids - WeAreTeachers

14 Must-Read Anti-Bullying Books for Kids - WeAreTeachers | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Bullying and cyberbullying is a difficult topic for everyone–students, parents and teachers, and it’s an increasing issue in classrooms statewide. In fact, 1 out of 4 teens are bullied and 1 out of 5 kids admit to being a bully. What’s even more startling is that 282,000 students are physically attacked in secondary schools…each month. 

With these statistics, it’s more important than ever to teach students about the negative effects of bullying, early-on. With the help of our awesome teacher community, we compiled these anti-bullying books (organized from youngest to oldest) that address teasing, friendship, self-esteem and more. 
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Grab a Piece of the Pi Using Cool Classroom Resources

Grab a Piece of the Pi Using Cool Classroom Resources | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Hey, math gurus! It’s that time of year again when teachers, students and mathematicians from all over the world honor the fun-loving irrational Greek figure pi (π). That’s right! March 14—or Pi Day—is just around the corner so be sure you don’t miss this opportunity to make a lasting impression on your math students!
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Young Adult Novels That Teach a Growth Mindset

Young Adult Novels That Teach a Growth Mindset | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Heroes in books and movies captivate kids, many of whom could teach a master class on these characters. The fresh perspective teachers can offer is how students themselves can and should be heroes.

As advocates of growth mindset, we can teach children that heroism does not require obsession with perfection or product. We should show students that we also value process and progress. Heroic stories can help: They teach students about mitigating mistakes, learning from loss, and overcoming adversity, all of which are key elements of growth mindset.
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Elementary Classroom Hacks: Big Ideas at Little Cost

Elementary Classroom Hacks: Big Ideas at Little Cost | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
It was my first year of teaching in my own classroom, and I was learning that teaching first grade requires a lot of creativity. It was also pretty clear from the beginning that customizing any classroom for teaching efficiency and student engagement could easily cost a lot of money. This is why I started to explore and practice the amazing and amusing art of classroom hacking.
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15 Ideas to Ensure That Project Based Learning is Grounded in Content and Standards by Michael Gorman

15 Ideas to Ensure That Project Based Learning is Grounded in Content and Standards by Michael Gorman | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"It is important that Project Based Learning provides students with wonderful opportunities that allow them to take part in a culture focused on rich activities and experiences. It promotes those important 21st-century skills while balancing this acquisition with important content knowledge and standards. The lessons and activities are intentional, aligned, and mapped to curricular standards. The standards and skills are constantly assessed in a variety of ways involving numerous stakeholders. Most of all, there is an alignment between standards, skills, and assessment. By incorporating these indicators teachers are ensured that they have provided a project process that is built on standards and proper skill acquisition. 


The four areas that serve as indicators for grounding PBL in standards are below. 

     * Curricular Content and Standards 

     * 21st Century Skills 

     * Formative and Summative Assessment 

     * Intentional and Aligned"



Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Ricard Garcia's curator insight, March 23, 4:00 AM
Good tips to give solid foundations to PBL... best way to prove it is not just playing time
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An Idea to Innovation to Best Practice

An Idea to Innovation to Best Practice | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
A question that was posed recently was challenging the notion of “innovation” in education, and how it challenges best practice.  “Best practice” can often be seen as the en…
Via Ines Bieler, Dean J. Fusto
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What Keeps Students Motivated to Learn? - MindShift

What Keeps Students Motivated to Learn? - MindShift | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Educators have lots of ideas about how to improve education, to better reach learners and to give students the skills they’ll need in college and beyond the classroom. But often those conversations remain between adults. The real test of any idea is in the classroom, though students are rarely asked about what they think about their education.

A panel of seven students attending schools that are part of the “deeper learning” movement gave their perspective on what it means for them to learn and how educators can work to create a school culture that fosters creativity, collaboration, trust, the ability to fail, and perhaps most importantly, one in which students want to participate.
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25 Mini-Films for Exploring Race, Bias and Identity With Students :: NY Times

25 Mini-Films for Exploring Race, Bias and Identity With Students :: NY Times | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"How do we get students to consider perspectives different from their own? How do we get them to challenge their own biases and prejudices? If, as Atticus Finch famously said, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view … until you climb into his skin and walk around in it,” how do we get our students to do that?

"Teachers traditionally turn to literature, history and current events to open up these conversations, but it’s always helpful to have a bigger toolbox to tackle such important and difficult issues. That’s why we pulled together these 25 short New York Times documentaries that range in time from 1 to 7 minutes and tackle issues of race, bias and identity.

"To help teachers make the most of these films, we also provide several teaching ideas, related readings and student activities.

"In the comments, we hope you’ll share how you use these films in your own classroom."


Via Jim Lerman, Lars-Göran Hedström
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Oskar Almazan's curator insight, March 17, 9:20 AM
"How do we get students to consider perspectives different from their own? How do we get them to challenge their own biases and prejudices? If, as Atticus Finch famously said, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view … until you climb into his skin and walk around in it,” how do we get our students to do that?
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20 Ideas for Professional Development in the Digital Age - ETALE

20 Ideas for Professional Development in the Digital Age - ETALE | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

What is professional development?  It is pretty much anything that helps one develop professionally. At the heart, professional development is about growth and learning.  In the field of education, it seems like many quickly think of educational opportunities that mimic what they see in their schools. As a result, they turn professional learning and education into schooling.  The problem with that is that schooling is too limiting.  In this age, there are many other exciting and high-impact learning opportunities for teachers that extend beyond traditional notions of schooling.  When we hear the phrase “professional development,” certain practices likely come to mind, things like in-services and conferences. In the digital age, there are countless other opportunities for professional development and restricting one’s thoughts to just a few options limits our insight into what is possible for our students.  With that in mind, here is a brainstorm of 20 options available to educators today. This is far from an exhaustive list, but it is enough to start exploring the possibilities.  Feel free to suggest others in a comment to this post.

 

Learn more:

 

Professional Development: WHY EDUcators And TEACHers Can’t Catch UP THAT Quickly AND How-To Change It

 

LEARNing To LEARN For MY Professional Development | I Did It MY Way

 

  


Via Gust MEES
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Ines Bieler's curator insight, March 18, 8:24 AM
I am Co-Keynoting next fall and we've chosen as our topic the necessity of sustained, engaging ProD. How to start it and how to grow it. Our focus is a little different but this article does hit upon several of the means that we are gathering. Thank you! In the end, we are convinced that it comes down to relationships. The teachers need to respect each other professionally and care for each other personally. If you have that, you have every ingredient necessary for a successful PD program. Any of these 20 program ideas can work if you have those relationships. 
Victor Ventura's curator insight, March 18, 9:46 AM
Anything goes in PD. Make it work for you in terms of time, location, in person/online, source, funding, and your preference for individual, small team, district, or strangers. 
Danny Castaño's curator insight, March 21, 12:22 AM
We can found in this article 20 different ideas in order to go beyond traditional practices since we are in a digital area with new desires and expectations from students about their learning process and for that we need to grow professionally as teachers. We can highlight some of the most relvevan ones such as "The Webinar with live sessions, Video Tutorials even when is one of the most common strategies,  is really helpful to our professional development, Graduate Courses and Programs online as well to get more knowledge about topics of interest, and other such as Accountability Partners, Training Programs and so on. We need to keep in mind that teachers can't never stop learning.
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The key to deep learning? Listen more, risk more, learn more - Alan November

The key to deep learning? Listen more, risk more, learn more - Alan November | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Have you ever taught a lesson really, really well—but not all of your students got it right on the test? Or, as a student, were you ever surprised that you completely blew a question on a test? Stacey Roshan is one of those teachers who cannot accept that her students fail when the material has been covered in class. Stacey’s response to this universal dilemma is to leverage emerging technologies to learn more about how, when, and why her students make mistakes—and her techniques have led to deep learning of difficult math concepts.
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Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, March 23, 4:13 AM
Een inspirerende kijk op 'dieper leren'
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Can you solve it? Pi Day puzzles that will leave you pie-eyed - theguardian

Can you solve it? Pi Day puzzles that will leave you pie-eyed - theguardian | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Hi guzzlers.

Tomorrow is Pi Day – March 14 – the annual excuse for the mathematical community to circulate puns about buns. I mean to honour pi, the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter, which to two decimal places is 3.14, hence 3/14, as the Americans write tomorrow’s date.

In recent years Pi Day has gone from a geeky American eccentricity to a global celebration of maths, and I’m getting my r’s in a day early with two puzzles from the brilliant minds at Brilliant.org. (That’s r for radius, obvs.)
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9 Ways To Support A Culture Of Wellness In Your School -

9 Ways To Support A Culture Of Wellness In Your School - | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"General wellness is an important concept for leading a healthy life wrapped up in a generic term. What does wellness look like and how can you encourage it in a class setting? Sketch-noter Sylvia Duckworth created the graphic above to share tips for supporting a culture of wellness in schools. 

Children spend a significant amount of each week day in a classroom, making it not only a place to learn academics but also an opportunity to teach life skills that will serve them beyond the schoolyard, like self-care, community involvement, and fostering a sense of connection and belonging. "

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Victor Ventura's curator insight, March 14, 11:47 AM
Focus on the central graphic- It tells it all!
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Relax! 7 ways to decompress after a long school day - Teachonomy

Relax! 7 ways to decompress after a long school day - Teachonomy | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
As teachers, we spend an enormous amount of time and energy during the school year trying to make sure we do our jobs well. Many of us don’t even sit down or relax until summertime rolls around.  There has to be a better way!
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, March 13, 8:23 AM
We absolutely need to find ways to relax daily. My favorite is to take 2-3 mile walk and listen to music on my iPod. Takes 30-40 minutes. 
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The 43 best websites for learning something new - Business Insider

The 43 best websites for learning something new - Business Insider | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
With so much learning content available, exploring only the best stuff on the web is crucial for your time and sanity.

We’ve saved you all those hours of painful Google searching with this list of great knowledge sources, inspiring blogs, tools, communities and course platforms that will help you discover fresh ideas or master new skills.

The final list was manually compiled by our expert panel from +250 nominees based on a scoring system analysing learning experience, content quality, and price.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, March 13, 8:18 AM
This is intriguing, you need to check out the list and couple of the recommended websites.
JASON CAVNESS's curator insight, March 13, 10:03 PM
There are so many avenues to learn.
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What Teachers Should Know About ADHD & ASD

What Teachers Should Know About ADHD & ASD | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Teachers are critical in helping children affected by ASD or ADHD, as they are positioned to communicate with parents/caregivers and practice appropriate classroom intervention.
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10 Tips For Launching An Inquiry-Based Classroom - MindShift

10 Tips For Launching An Inquiry-Based Classroom - MindShift | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
It takes time to build up a strong inquiry-based teaching practice, to learn how to direct student questions with other questions, and to get comfortable in a guiding role. But when Laufenberg talks about what it takes, she makes it sound easy. We’ve broken her advice down into digestible tips for anyone ready to jump in and try for themselves.
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