Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2012: The Flipped Classroom

Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2012: The Flipped Classroom | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
“Flipping the classroom” is hardly new. But with all the hype surrounding both Khan Academy and MOOCs, it’s hardly surprising that the practice became incredibly popular this year."
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A look at both sides of the Flipped Classroom ...

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Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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Five Things Teachers Are Ready to Ditch in 2017 - John Spencer @spencerideas

Here's a fun, tongue-in-cheek list of things to ditch in education as we move into the new year. (Hint: bottle-flipping is one of them)
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Nurturing Intrinsic Motivation and Growth Mindset in Writing

Nurturing Intrinsic Motivation and Growth Mindset in Writing | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
It's the first writing conference, four weeks into the year, with this blond senior. He stiffly leans back from me as far as the metal desk will allow, exuding cynicism, too cool for meeting with teachers about his writing. I can see he doesn't trust me yet or know why we conference, and he's afraid. He says, "So, what is this meeting about then?" And we begin.
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I Think Every Teacher Should Read This Book. Here’s Why. - WeAreTeachers

I Think Every Teacher Should Read This Book. Here’s Why. - WeAreTeachers | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Learn how this English teacher has pulled together amazing advice and wisdom for his students based on the book The Humans by Matt Haig.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, January 21, 8:03 AM
A recommendation from a fellow teacher.
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Helping Struggling Students Build a Growth Mindset - @Edutopia

Helping Struggling Students Build a Growth Mindset - @Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Veteran researchers present five strategies—like maintaining success files and allowing choice—to help struggling students develop a positive attitude needed for success.
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A top futurist predicts the largest internet company of 2030 will be an online school

A top futurist predicts the largest internet company of 2030 will be an online school | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Futurist Thomas Frey claims Google and Facebook won't be the largest online companies by 2030 — rather, an education company that may not exist yet.

Via Maggie Verster
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14 Resources on Teaching a Growth MindsetASCD Inservice

14 Resources on Teaching a Growth MindsetASCD Inservice | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Research shows that teachers can greatly influence student mindsets. Learners who believe they can grow their basic abilities are more motivated and successful than students who believe their abilities are fixed. Here is a curated list of resources just released on ASCD myTeachSource that show you effective feedback strategies and how you can create a risk-tolerant, pro-growth learning environment from top education experts.
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Joanne Glantz's curator insight, January 15, 11:08 PM

The Growth Mindset rage is the best positive motivational trend in recent years. It focuses us on the effort and not the ability which opens the door to learning.

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Circuit Playground meets Scratch—Physical Computing for Kindergartners

Circuit Playground meets Scratch—Physical Computing for Kindergartners | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Circuit Playground meets Scratch—Physical Computing for Kindergartners
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Teaching 'Truthiness': Professors Offer Course On How to Write Fake News (EdSurge News)

Teaching 'Truthiness': Professors Offer Course On How to Write Fake News (EdSurge News) | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
It sounds like a fake news story: Two professors plan a free online course on how to write fake news.

But this course is real—as well as an act of satire. It’s called “How to Write and Read Fake News: Journalism in the Age of Trump,” and it’s being offered as a kind of performance art to draw attention to the problem of the influential falsehoods that are spreading online. The course is the latest offering from a long-running satirical project called UnderAcademy College, whose previous courses included “Grammar Porn” and “Underwater Procrastination and Advanced Desublimation Techniques.”
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The Science Behind How Sleep Makes You Smarter

The Science Behind How Sleep Makes You Smarter | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
I’m a science geek. I like to know why a particular approach to life or technique for success works. Otherwise, I tend to glaze over when faced with another “X Ways to Achieve Y Results” article. In the absence of research or evidence, I’m less likely to pay attention and less motivated to make a change in my life.

Maybe that’s just me. But I’ll assume you’re also a “but how do we know that really matters?” person and lay it out for you -- on the subject of sleep.

Sleep is free, available to all, beyond good for us and largely ignored as the foundation of physical health and mental energy. It’s the first thing that gets cut when life is busy and the last thing we add back in when a chunk of time comes our way. But if we were smart, it would be our main priority, and the rest of our lives would be built around it.
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5 Minutes to Change Culture: The 5 to Thrive Challenge | Getting Smart

5 Minutes to Change Culture: The 5 to Thrive Challenge | Getting Smart | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Who doesn’t want to improve the tone of the whole day in 5 minutes or less? What better commitment to make in the new year than to positively impact your own life, the lives of those around you, and your school’s culture?

The science of character strengths and social emotional learning (SEL) is well-documented and quite actionable. All that is needed is a bit of intentional leadership.

Mayerson Academy, a non-profit professional learning organization, launched the “5 to Thrive Challenge” to encourage education leaders to dedicate five minutes each day over the next month to engage in simple activities that will reframe their thinking and improve the culture in their school. To help get started and frame your thinking, Mayerson Academy provides a free “5 to Thrive Toolkit” that will get you started."

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10 Science-Backed Ways To Be More Positive In 2017

10 Science-Backed Ways To Be More Positive In 2017 | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it


For a variety of reasons ranging from sorrow over the deaths of some beloved cultural icons to the bitter acrimony that characterized much of the political scene, a fair number of people were happy to say "so long" to 2016 when the ball dropped on December 31.

But the reality is that New Year’s Eve is just a day on the calendar—there’s no firewall that prevents some of its negativity from drifting onto our shiny new 12-month slate. Being more positive in the new year requires an active choice—and a range of new habits. Here are 10 ways to start now.

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10 Teacher Resolutions for 2017 - STEM JOBS

10 Teacher Resolutions for 2017 - STEM JOBS | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
It’s that time of year again! We all make resolutions with the best of intentions, but old habits die hard and the promises we make to ourselves can be hard to keep. Here are some teacher resolutions worth keeping.
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4 Things All Project-Based Learning Teachers Should Do -

4 Things All Project-Based Learning Teachers Should Do - | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Gone are the days when students were expected to sit passively at desks while teachers lectured endlessly, expecting children to soak up the information being thrown at them. In today’s educational environment, students are expected to collaborate, think critically, and work together to develop innovative projects and answers to complex questions.


To support this mission, many schools have begun to take part in a practice known as Project-Based Learning (PBL). PBL allows teachers to expose students to a wide variety of 21st Century skills, and allows students to interact with curriculum in a way that is engaging, authentic, and fun!

Making a shift from traditional forms of learning to PBL can be challenging. PBL can require a lot of prep work on the part of the teacher. But the gains in student engagement and achievement are immeasurable. Here are four steps to help you create a Project Based-Learning classroom
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10 Intriguing Photographs to Teach Close Reading and Visual Thinking Skills

10 Intriguing Photographs to Teach Close Reading and Visual Thinking Skills | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Ever want your students to slow down and notice details when they read — whether they’re perusing a book, a poem, a map or a political cartoon? Young people often want to hurry up and make meaning via a quick skim or a cursory glance when a text can demand patience and focus.

Closely reading any text, whether written or visual, requires that students proceed more slowly and methodically, noticing details, making connections and asking questions. This takes practice. But it certainly helps when students want to read the text.

We’ve selected 10 photos from The Times that we’ve used previously in our weekly “What’s Going On in This Picture?” and that have already successfully caught students’ and teachers’ attention. These are some of our most popular images — ones that may make viewers say “huh?” on first glance, but that spark enough curiosity to make them want to dig deeper. (Please Note: You can quickly learn the backstory about any of these photos by clicking the link in each caption that takes you to the original post, then scrolling down to find the “reveal.”)

Below, we offer ideas from students and teachers who have engaged with these images for ways to use them, or images like them, to teach close reading and visual thinking skills.
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New Media Literacy: What Students Need to Know About Fake News

New Media Literacy: What Students Need to Know About Fake News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Fake news, unreliable websites, viral posts—you would think students who have grown up with the internet would easily navigate it all, but according to a study done by Stanford researchers, that couldn’t be further from the truth.

Researchers describe the results of the study done on middle school, high school and college students across the country as “bleak.” Students were asked to judge advertisements, social media, video and photographic evidence, news reports and websites. Though researchers thought they were giving students simple tasks, they say that “in every case and at every level, we were taken aback by students’ lack of preparation.”

As if that weren’t bad enough, researchers go on to say, “At present, we worry that democracy is threatened by the ease at which disinformation about civic issues is allowed to spread and flourish.”

So what can educators do about the spread of fake news and our students’ inability to recognize when they have been fooled? Lesson plans that explicitly address the new media literacy and task students to be responsible consumers and disseminators of news are a good place to start.

Here are eight things that students need to know about fake news and the new media literacy:
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9 Ways to Inspire Student Inventors - Vicki Davis @CoolCatTeacher @Edutopia

9 Ways to Inspire Student Inventors - Vicki Davis @CoolCatTeacher @Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"There’s an old saying that the things that change your life are the books you read, the places you go, and the people you meet. But I’d like to add a fourth: the challenges you face (and how you face them) will always change your life. If we want our students to respond to challenges with creativity and inventiveness, we must create the conditions in which innovation is not only possible but encouraged. You don’t help students learn to invent by giving worksheets or cookie-cutter assignments. In fact, these one-size-fits-all approaches may actually take up the time that could be used for such creativity.

According to the Torrance Test—which measures CQ, or creativity quotient—the United States has been declining in creativity since 1990. There has to be a reason.

Perhaps it is because we focus on students’ weaknesses instead of their strengths. In many schools, we’ll put a math genius who struggles with grammar into extra English classes. Should we not give this math genius access to college-level advanced math work, and figure out the basic English requirements he or she needs for a basic understanding of grammar? Why do we think that all students should be good at everything?

We can either be average at everything or exceptional at something. With this in mind, here are some things we need to do to encourage student inventors as we nurture student passions, interests, and strengths."

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What is a Global Digital Citizen and Why Does the World Need Them?

What is a Global Digital Citizen and Why Does the World Need Them? | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
The Global Digital Citizen understands that we can govern technology for the benefit of both ourselves and others. It is a citizen that views the world as an interconnected community. Additionally, they realize we simultaneously share technological and human experiences regardless of culture, status, or political/religious beliefs.

So we define the best assets of the Global Digital Citizen using 5 tenets.

Via Nik Peachey
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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, January 16, 3:53 PM

Interesante artículo sobre que es un ciudadano global digital y porque es importante.

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, January 19, 2:20 PM
Un article intéressant qui dessine les contours du futur citoyen du monde et qui donne quelques pistes pour l'introduire dans l'enseignement.
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The Transcendent Nature of Sir Ken Robinson in Global Education

The Transcendent Nature of Sir Ken Robinson in Global Education | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Sweat slowly trickled down my temple. My feet were still racing yet my body lie in wait for the doors to open. Camera crew ready? Check! My sales pitch? No. I had gone through every scenario I could think of and yet I still felt drastically unprepared for my pitch.

My pitch to the world-renowned Sir Ken Robinson.

I was at the ASCD educational conference waiting for keynote speaker Sir Ken Robinson to arrive. My hope was to capture his thoughts about global education without stumbling over my words. This was the biggest and most prominent voice in education and I was seconds away from my chance.

As we waited, backstage, the doors opened with sparkling L.A. sunshine flashing through the opening, amidst the backdrop of a blackout of florescent exhibit hall lighting, revealing the silhouette we have all come to know.

It was the Sir Ken Robinson!
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12 Ways You Can Energize Classroom Learning [Infographic] by Lee Watanabe-Crockett

12 Ways You Can Energize Classroom Learning [Infographic] by Lee Watanabe-Crockett | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
by Lee Watanabe-Crockett

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, January 14, 10:37 PM
Engage and energize your students' learning with these strategies.
Victor Ventura's curator insight, January 15, 11:06 AM
Resources to help connect to students' interests.
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How Igloos Can Keep You Warm - And Winter Phys Ed Activities

How Igloos Can Keep You Warm - And Winter Phys Ed Activities | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
How an Igloo Keeps You Warm is a new video from It's Okay To Be Smart. The video does a great job of explaining how an igloo provides insulation and stays relatively warm when people are inside it. The video also explains the engineering concepts used in the creation of a strong and warm igloo.
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4 Strategies for Teaching Students How to Revise

4 Strategies for Teaching Students How to Revise | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"I'm a fan of the writing workshop. That means I also write with my students, and I allow plenty of time for students to conference with me and with each other. I also provide models of what good writing looks like -- and lots of them.

Here's what the classroom writing process looks like:

    * Brainstorming (Think About It)
    * Drafting (Getting It Down)
    * Revising (Making It Better)
    *Editing (Making It Right)
    * Publishing (Sharing It!)


At the beginning of the writing process, I have had students write silently. For it to be successful, in my experience, students need plenty of topics handy (self-generated, or a list of topics, questions, and prompts provided). Silent writing is a wonderful, focused activity for the brainstorming and drafting stage of the writing process. I also think it's important that the teacher write during this time, as well (model, model, model).

However, when it comes to revising, and later, editing, I think peer interaction is necessary. Students need to, for example, "rehearse" words, phrases, introductions, and thesis statements with each other during the revision stage."

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Victor Ventura's curator insight, January 14, 8:56 AM
Writing Workshop Participants- Good resource, mainly for intermediate and secondary teachers, but a little something for all grade level teachers.
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No Job Is Safe, But These Skills Will Always Be Valued in the Workplace

No Job Is Safe, But These Skills Will Always Be Valued in the Workplace | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
If you’d asked farmers a few hundred years ago what skills their kids would need to thrive, it wouldn’t have taken long to answer. They’d need to know how to milk a cow or plant a field. General skills for a single profession that only changed slowly—and this is how it was for most humans through history.

But in the last few centuries? Not so much.

Each generation, and even within generations, we see some jobs largely disappear, while other ones pop up. Machines have automated much of manufacturing, for example, and they’ll automate even more soon. But as manufacturing jobs decline, they’ve been replaced by other once unimaginable professions like bloggers, coders, dog walkers, or pro gamers.

In a world where these labor cycles are accelerating, the question is: What skills do we teach the next generation so they can keep pace?
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What the Heck Is Inquiry-Based Learning?

What the Heck Is Inquiry-Based Learning? | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Inquiry-based learning is more than asking a student what he or she wants to know. It’s about triggering curiosity. And activating a student’s curiosity is, I would argue, a far more important and complex goal than the objective of mere information delivery.

Nevertheless, despite its complexity, inquiry-based learning can be somehow easier on teachers, too. True, it’s seemingly easier because it transfers some responsibilities from teachers to students, but it’s really easier because releasing authority engages students.

Teachers who use inquiry-based learning combat the “dunno” -- a chronic problem in student engagement. 

Let’s face it, when you ask a student something like, “What do you want to know about _______?” you are often met with a shrug, or a, “dunno.” Inquiry-based learning, if front-loaded well, generates such excitement in students that neurons begin to fire, curiosity is triggered, and students can’t wait to become experts in answering their own questions.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, January 11, 10:17 AM
Increasing student curiosity, responsibilities, and engagement! Interested? Read this piece.
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​Brain Science and Education: How Much Should Teachers Know? (EdSurge News)

​Brain Science and Education: How Much Should Teachers Know? (EdSurge News) | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Jasselle Cirino’s classroom might surprise those accustomed to traditional lectures. Instead of being told to sit quietly and listen, her first graders absorb material through physical movement, vocal exercises and group activities meant to indulge in students’ tendencies to socialize, move and speak.

“We’re teaching to use multiple parts of the brain to better engage students and retain more information,” says Cirino, a former classroom teacher now training for Reading Recovery, a nonprofit tutoring program for first-grade students.

The approach is something Cirino and other educators refer to as “Whole Brain Teaching.” It involves techniques—like assigning arm gestures to instructional content to engage students’ motor cortex, or call and response phrases that grab attention and tap into students’ prefrontal cortex—specifically designed to tickle different parts of the brain while learning. And it's becoming more popular among scientists and educators alike, who believe teachers—and therefore students—can benefit from a better understanding of how the brain works.

Yet many typical teacher training programs today don’t offer much training or exposure to neuroscience, which begs the question: What should teachers know about the brain?
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Innovate My School - ‘History Mysteries’: How not knowing leads to great knowing!

Innovate My School - ‘History Mysteries’: How not knowing leads to great knowing! | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"One thing that always interested me about History was the growing realisation that even the supposedly simplest and most straightforward facts are quite often shrouded in a mystifying narrative; a trail of sources that leaves the true story open to a range of opposing interpretations and outcomes. Whilst we may think we have answered all the questions and arrived at the correct conclusions about the sequences of events, a differing theory or discovery of a contradictory source can suddenly debunk the accepted.


That is what makes learning History so fascinating; the mysteries. The definite mysteries that we may never solve or we can see evolving into an answer as decades move forward, or the certain chronicle that suddenly finds itself turning into a cryptic puzzle as later evidence emerges. Within us all is a person who wants to know the answers when challenged by the unknown, and to embrace the exhilaration of cracking a Sherlockian case. Instead of a just a ‘Whodunnit?’, exploring history mysteries involves a wider spectrum of narratives and therefore can offer a far more rich tapestry of skills including analysis, questioning and the evaluation of places, events and persons. Follow me down the rabbit’s hole into the wonderland of history mysteries."

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Smart Strategies That Help Students Learn How to Learn

Smart Strategies That Help Students Learn How to Learn | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Teaching students good learning strategies would ensure that they know how to acquire new knowledge, which leads to improved learning outcomes, writes lead author Helen Askell-Williams of Flinders University in Adelaide, Australia. And studies bear this out. Askell-Williams cites as one example a recent finding by PISA, the Programme for International Student Assessment, which administers academic proficiency tests to students around the globe, and place American students in the mediocre middle. “Students who use appropriate strategies to understand and remember what they read, such as underlining important parts of the texts or discussing what they read with other people, perform at least 73 points higher in the PISA assessment—that is, one full proficiency level or nearly two full school years—than students who use these strategies the least,” the PISA report reads.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 


Via Gust MEES
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, January 4, 11:28 AM
The focus is on student self-assessment as it should be. All should be aware of not just what they know, but how they learned best.
Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, January 5, 9:01 AM
Leren over leren. Het loont.