Proctor's review of WAITRESS
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JASS 345: AUDIO PRODUCTION

Project #3: Final Project

PROPOSAL: 3/25 | SPOTTING SHEET: 4/8 | FIRST COMPLETE MIX: 4/15

FINAL PROJECT DUE: April 26th, 11:30am (mandatory attendance)

Upload these to the Final Project M+Box folder labeled YourLastNameFinal.wav.

 

 

For your final project, you have a few options.

 

OPTION 1: FABLE or FAIRY TALE

Length: 4-8 minutes

For this option, choose a fable or fairy tale and translate it into a rich audio story, complete with voice, sound effects, ambience, and music. You may target an audience of children or adults, but be specific in your audience choice.

 

You can choose any appropriate fable or fairy tale, but here are a few links to help you out:

 

Hans Christian Andersen: http://hca.gilead.org.il/

Aesop’s Fables: http://www.aesopfables.com/aesopsel.html

Grimm’s Fairy Tales: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~spok/grimmtmp/

 

You may need to do some re-writing or editing to make your chosen story appropriate for the spoken word. You will need to record voice elements (this can be a single speaker or multiple speakers), as well as sound effects.

 

PARAMETERS

Demonstrate strong recording and miking technique (signal/noise ratio)Strong story construction – beginning, middle, and endAppropriate levels throughout the projectStrong mixing technique and multi-layered audioStrong editing technique and smooth transitionsAttention to pacing and rhythm; not just wall-to-wall talkingCreativity in sound effects and interpretation of the story, beyond literal and mechanical use of effectsProficiency in using Media Composer (or Pro Tools)

 

REQUIREMENTS

At least TWO TRACKS OF SOUND at all times, except for motivated use of silenceYou may use some pre-recorded sound effects, but they MUST BE MANIPULATED BY YOU. No purely canned sound effects.At least FIVE sound elements must be recorded by youAll music must be PUBLIC DOMAIN, CREATIVE COMMONS-LICENSED, or USED WITH WRITTEN PERMISSIONExport as a .wav file labeled as Project3YourLastNameWritten documentation:List of sounds YOU recordedList of music beds and their sources (where you got them)Statement of permission to use music (if applicable)Self-evaluation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OPTION 2: MOVIE SCENE SOUNDTRACK

Length: 3-5 minutes

For this option, choose a scene from a movie (or video game), strip the sound, and rebuild the soundtrack from scratch using sound effects, music, and ambience. You may also incorporate dialogue depending on the scene. The goal should be to create a realistic, rich soundtrack that explores onscreen and offscreen space, emotional impact, worldizing, and synchresis (the impact of associating a sound with an image that may not match the actual sound source).

 

This option will involve creating sound effects as well as foley recording carefully matched to the image. This option will also require some knowledge of video production (though I can help).

 

PARAMETERS

Demonstrate strong recording and miking technique (signal/noise ratio)Strong “worldizing” – a believable creation of spaceAppropriate levels throughout the projectStrong mixing technique and multi-layered audioStrong editing technique and smooth transitionsAttention to pacing and appropriate sounds for emotional impactCreativity in sound effects and interpretation of the sceneProficiency in using Media Composer

 

REQUIREMENTS

At least TWO TRACKS OF SOUND at all times, except for motivated use of silenceYou may use some pre-recorded sound effects, but they MUST BE MANIPULATED BY YOU. No purely canned sound effects.At least FIVE sound elements must be recorded by youSome instances of PANNING may be includedAll music must be PUBLIC DOMAIN, CREATIVE COMMONS-LICENSED, or USED WITH WRITTEN PERMISSIONExport as a .mov file labeled as Project3YourLastNameWritten documentation:List of sound elements YOU recordedList of music beds and their sources (where you got them)Statement of permission to use music (if applicable)Self-evaluation

 

 

OPTION 3: PROPOSE YOUR OWN

If neither of the above options appeals to you, or you have another idea in mind, you may propose your own project. This should be a significant work, approximately five minutes in length, that utilizes the techniques and concepts covered in class. So, a set of radio promos; an extended audio documentary; a radio play; a work of sound art may all qualify. Your proposal, however, should demonstrate a clear idea of your work, how it will engage concepts from class, and specifics about the components it will include.

 

 

 

PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS

Your proposal should be a detailed, one-page pitch for your idea. Be specific about the option you choose, the fable/scene you will work with, your tentative ideas for sounds you will incorporate, and why you think this project is a strong idea. Also include your target audience – who is the audience you are making this for? This proposal should not be a simply statement of your idea – it should persuade the reader (me) that it is a good idea and that you are well-prepared to execute it. MUST BE APPROVED TO RECEIVE CREDIT FOR THIS PART OF THE ASSIGNMENT. Late proposals will receive no credit.  This should be turned in as a hard copy.

 

SPOTTING SHEET REQUIREMENTS

The spotting sheet contains notes and plans for each sound that will occur over the course of the project. That includes music, sound effects, and ambience. It indicates at what point the sounds will occur and how long they will last.

 

You can use one of the Spotting Sheets on CTools or construct one of your own, but it should indicate either timecode (if you have a rough mix in place) or a line of dialogue/action that serves as the cue for the sound, along with a description of the sound. See the reading “Working with Multiple Tracks” for more details. This should be turned in as a hard copy.

 

FIRST MIX REQUIREMENTS

This should be a complete mix with only a couple elements missing, if any at all, ready for critique This is NOT a handful of items on a timeline waiting to be arranged. This purpose of the rough mix is to get feedback on how to improve the project so that the final work is polished, complete, and the very best it can be. Upload these to the First Mix M+Box folder labeled YourLastNameFirstMix.

 

SELF-EVALUATION – Respond to these questions.

1)    How does this piece compellingly use sound to convey a story, emotion, or other impact?

2)    How could the piece be strengthened, technically or conceptually?

3)    What was the most challenging aspect of this project, and how did you deal with it?

4)    Reflect on what you found useful in making this project.

 

 

PRODUCTION RESOURCES:

Sound effects, ambience

Sound Effects library in our Lab_Library folder

 

Freesound Project

http://www.freesound.org

 

Music (Creative Commons licensed):

CCmixter

http://dig.ccmixter.org/

 

Netlabels (online record labels)

http://www.archive.org/details/netlabels

 

Music collection at archive.org

http://www.archive.org/details/audio_music

 

Vimeo Music Store (search “free”)

http://vimeo.com/musicstore

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