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Privacy and Surveillance by PBS FRONTLINE (Podcast)

Privacy experts Julia Angwin and Hanni Fakhoury discuss how to protect your data online — and whether privacy matters in a digital world. This podcast is connected to Frontline's 2 Part Series on "United States of Secrets" (http://bit.ly/FrontlineUSASecrets)

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25 Online Security Tools for Small Businesses

25 Online Security Tools for Small Businesses | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it

Here is a list of online security tools for small businesses. There are tools for cyber defense and secure communication. Included are encryption applications, security testers, secure communication tools, password apps, online security platforms, an open threat exchange, and a cyber security planner for small businesses. Nearly all of these tools are free or have free plans.

 


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Grab Your Shades: 'The Future of Violence' Is a Bright One

Grab Your Shades: 'The Future of Violence' Is a Bright One | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it
Here’s the metaphor you want to keep in mind: Seven billion people walking around with nuclear weapons in their pocket. How do you govern a world in which everyone has an app on their phone to dest...
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3 reasons to be wary of the Internet of Things

3 reasons to be wary of the Internet of Things | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it
IT and security experts discuss why companies and consumers alike should be careful about deploying ‘smart’ appliances and devices that connect to the Internet and offer steps to protect against security and privacy threats.
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Spies Can Track You Just by Watching Your Phone's Power Use | WIRED

Spies Can Track You Just by Watching Your Phone's Power Use | WIRED | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it
Researchers at Stanford University and Israel's defense research group Rafael have created a technique they call PowerSpy, which they say can gather information about an Android phone's geolocation merely by tracking its power use over time through...

Via Luigi Cappel
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Luigi Cappel's curator insight, February 21, 2015 4:44 PM

There is no question that technology from Israeli experts, many of whom are ex military on a level with DARPA are extremely clever and these new concepts make some sense. In the case of the average person, all you really need to do is invent location based apps using GPS that sufficient people want to use, or capture the unique signals of mobiles via WiFi and Bluetooth that already pervade the ether.

I'm assuming a key issue they are trying to deal with are burners, such as we see on TV shows and movies. Prepay mobiles that people wanting to commit crimes buy and use on a one off basis so they can't be identified. They would therefore not be running apps (at least not ones that are registered with Apple, Google or Microsoft, unless they were wolves dressed as lambs. This is probably now common practice amongst more intelligent criminals, or ones with a lot to hide and if the purpose were to monitor terrorists, they would have additional difficulty identifying them.

Interestingly, these phones would be very attractive to the manufacturers because they would get full price for them, but keep replacing them.

Location based tracking is something that is becoming pervasive and will become significantly more so, mostly for good reasons rather than bad, but as a side effect, each new development chips away at our privacy. For me, I don't have a problem because I don't deliberately commit any crimes. However, if I lived in a country where my private information could be abused, I would have a very different attitude and therein lies the real concern.

When a state that denies people their rights of belief, of individualism, of freedom of speech and to democracy abuses its people, this inevitable technology including IoT, Bluetooth, RFID, Drones, smart cars and mobile apps can become a powerful means to control society to a point where human rights cease to exist. Orwell, Kafka, Philip K Dick and many others if they were still alive would be sending Tweets out right now saying "We told you so".

Don't get me wrong, I'm a big fan of benevolent use of these technologies. I just have the luxury of living in a country that fundamentally cares about its people regardless of their beliefs, the color of their skin, their lifestyle and their physical and mental health. We can use those technologies to improve people's quality of life. That can't be said for many other countries right now. Technology does not recognise borders of sovereignty or of right or wrong. It just is.

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Car hacked on 60 Minutes

Car hacked on 60 Minutes | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it
No real security on the Internet -- even the military is under daily assault - says the man the Defense Department hired to make the web more secure
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The Slow Death of ‘Do Not Track’

The Slow Death of ‘Do Not Track’ | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it

An industry working group is expected to propose detailed rules governing how the privacy switch should work. The group includes experts but is dominated by Internet giants like Adobe, Apple, Facebook, Google and Yahoo. If regulators go along, the rules would allow the largest Internet giants to continue scooping up data about users on their own sites and on other sites that include their plug-ins, such as Facebook’s “Like” button or an embedded YouTube video. This giant loophole would make “Do Not Track” meaningless.

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Security App Lookout Attracts $150 Million in Venture Capital

Security App Lookout Attracts $150 Million in Venture Capital | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it

Lookout, a seven-year-old mobile security company with 50 million users, has attracted $150 million from investors led by T. Rowe Price Associates. 


Most important, it appeals to consumers and companies worried about malware, viruses and other threats. The app says it can block malicious websites as well as check which other apps are using a consumer’s private information. And it includes a service to help consumers recover a lost or stolen phone.


In the United States, Lookout has partnered with AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint, which offer the service to their customers. It also works with major mobile companies in Germany, France and Britain.

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The Leaky Corporation

The Leaky Corporation | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it

In early February Hewlett-Packard showed off its new tablet computer, which it hopes will be a rival to Apple's iPad. The event was less exciting than it might have been, thanks to the leaking of the design in mid-January. Other technology companies have suffered similar embarrassments lately. Dell's timetable for bringing tablets to market appeared on a tech-news website. A schedule for new products from NVIDIA, which makes graphics chips, also seeped out.


Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, June 8, 2014 4:39 AM

Digital information is easy not only to store but also to leak. Companies must decide what they really need to keep secret, and how best to do so.

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Generation Like – FRONTLINE

Generation Like – FRONTLINE | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it

FRONTLINE explores how the perennial teen quest for identity and connection has migrated to social media – and how big brands are increasingly co-opting young consumers’ digital

BrianBurnett's insight:

How much do you know about the currency of "Like". Like it or not, it's here.  

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Never Forgetting a Face - NYTimes.com

Never Forgetting a Face - NYTimes.com | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it
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Face-matching today could enable mass surveillance, “basically robbing everyone of their anonymity.” In regrads to the intelligence documents made public by Edward J. Snowden,  once companies amass consumers’ facial data, government agencies might obtain access to it, too.

 

Over the past few years, several tech giants have acquired face-recognition start-up businesses. In 2011, Google bought Pittsburgh Pattern Recognition, a computer vision business developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University. In 2012, Facebook bought Face.com, an Israeli start-up. Google and Facebook both declined to comment for this article about their plans for the technology.

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How your employees put your organization at risk

How your employees put your organization at risk | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it
Security threats don't come only from the outside. The biggest threats are often sitting right in the office. Whether it's adult websites or social media, employees are accessing content that puts your business at risk.
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Tips for Educating Employees about Cybersecurity

Tips for Educating Employees about Cybersecurity | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it

Cyberthreats to your business are usually blamed on outsiders— nefarious programmers writing malicious code designed to pilfer your corporate intelligence, syphon your confidential customer information, and/or raid your financial data. Sometimes, the threat actually originates from within when employees’ ignorance and/or negligence opens the door for cybercriminals.

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Are Social Media Giants Betraying Your Trust?

Are Social Media Giants Betraying Your Trust? | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it
The leading social media companies are outraged over NSA surveillance, but would that spying even be possible if Facebook, Google and Twitter weren't collecting data and selling it to online marketers? Social media companies unintentionally opened new windows for spies to creep into our lives, and their claims of innocence are insincere.
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Are Social Media Giants Betraying Your Trust?

Are Social Media Giants Betraying Your Trust? | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it
The leading social media companies are outraged over NSA surveillance, but would that spying even be possible if Facebook, Google and Twitter weren't collecting data and selling it to online marketers? Social media companies unintentionally opened new windows for spies to creep into our lives, and their claims of innocence are insincere.
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Frontline Roundtable: Corporate Social Responsibility

How responsible should companies be about their impact on the world? Christine Bader, author of The Evolution of a Corporate Idealist: When Girl Meets Oil, and Arvind Ganesan, director of the business
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Prying Eyes: Inside the NSA's War on Internet Security **

Prying Eyes: Inside the NSA's War on Internet Security ** | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it
US and British intelligence agencies undertake every effort imaginable to crack all types of encrypted Internet communication. The cloud, it seems, is full of holes. The good news: New Snowden documents show that some forms of encryption still cause problems for the NSA.

Via Constantin Ionel Milos / Milos Constantin
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China Clamps Down on Web, Pinching Companies Like Google

China Clamps Down on Web, Pinching Companies Like Google | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it
Chinese authorities have tightened censorship over Internet traffic in recent weeks, and Google and its services are particularly affected.


China’s crackdown on foreign Internet services coincides with two trends. One lies in the country’s growing worries about domestic terrorism, particularly after a series of deadly attacks at train stations this year. The other is ever-rising nationalism, directed primarily at Japan but also at Japan’s allies, notably the United States.

President Xi Jinping of China, who is also the Communist Party chief, has made clear that he wants to maintain the party’s primacy. He has signaled the importance he places on controlling the Internet by personally taking the top position in the party‘s leading group on cybersecurity.

Frustrated users have often resorted to “virtual private network,” or V.P.N., services to evade China’s Internet filters. But those services, too, have come under concerted attack from the authorities, who have interrupted service to them with increasing frequency. Many ordinary citizens cannot afford or obtain access to V.P.N.s to begin with.

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Most People Are Still Confused About Cloud Storage, And No One Service Is Winning The Race To Educate And Acquire Users

Most People Are Still Confused About Cloud Storage, And No One Service Is Winning The Race To Educate And Acquire Users | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it

Consumers aren't using cloud storage services in very large numbers, even as nearly every Internet user is on the cloud in some way.

Almost 90% of U.S. broadband users polled have at least heard of "cloud storage," according to a study from nScreenMedia.

 

BII

But only 29% said they currently use it, and about half of the respondents had either never heard of cloud storage services, didn't use them, or reported not knowing anything about them.

This is a huge opportunity for cloud service companies to build out their audiences.

In particular, usage of cloud storage services, such as iCloud, Dropbox, and Microsoft OneDrive, will soar over the next few years as more consumers come to understand the value of storing their data, files, and media online.  


Via Philippe J DEWOST
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Philippe J DEWOST's curator insight, July 23, 2014 6:08 AM

Interesting: I didn't seize Microsoft's share nor realized they were ahead of Google drive.

looks like an opportunity for @tariq and @jolicloud :-)

Android Tips & Hacks's curator insight, August 1, 2014 8:44 AM

There are too many cloud services and not enough differentiation between them. Where they do work well, such as Apple's iCloud, they are transparent enough that the user doesn't even really know that it is doing anything at all. That's the dream, of course, but it doesn't help you sell your product.

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How Not to Pay the Price for Free Wi-Fi

How Not to Pay the Price for Free Wi-Fi | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it
Jumping on a network at a coffee shop or park could put your privacy at risk. Here are some ways to stay (reasonably) safe.
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United States of Secrets | FRONTLINE

United States of Secrets | FRONTLINE | Privacy & Security | Scoop.it

How did the government come to spy on millions of Americans?

 

In “United States of Secrets,” a two-part series airing May 13 & 20, FRONTLINE reveals the dramatic inside story of how the U.S. government came to monitor and collect the communications of millions of people around the world—and the lengths they went to trying to hide the massive surveillance program from the public.

BrianBurnett's insight:

This is a Must-See.  An in-depth report of today's digital world and the issue of security and privacy. It even helps extend one's insights of how big data and privacy will evolve.

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