Prionomy
Follow
Find tag "energy"
12.2K views | +0 today
Prionomy
del concepto a los resultados
Curated by Pepe Crespo
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Pepe Crespo from green streets
Scoop.it!

The Smart Grid in 2013: Charged for Growth

The Smart Grid in 2013: Charged for Growth | Prionomy | Scoop.it

In the past year, the grid has seen some remarkable highs, while also being tested to meet the basic needs of society.


On one hand, big advances have flourished, fundamentally changing the way we power our lives. Roof-mounted solar panels have gone from a costly oddity to a competitive selling point for many homes and battery-powered vehicles have gained traction.

On the other hand, the idea of progress has been challenged by a slew of weather woes that have shaken consumer confidence in our energy infrastructure. A series of intense storms, heat waves and drought made 2012 one of the toughest years globally for the grid in many years.

So what will 2013 bring? The growth of the smart grid.

A new stage is opening - where the public was once ambivalent about the smart grid, consumers are now starting to demand these improvements, spurred by the need to improve reliability, participation and the resiliency to recover from large-scale grid events.

Going into the new year, pressure to rebuild the northeast's grid with more resilience will further boost trends that point towards investment in these smart technologies to continue to expand by over 10% over the next five years.
And while efforts to date have focused on improving the grid's heavy-duty backbone, a look ahead suggests that coming smart grid efforts will reach more directly into everyday life.


Here's what's in store for 2013...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Lauren Moss's curator insight, December 26, 2012 3:07 PM

An interesting look at the future of the smart grid, renewable energy and the trends that are shaping the development of these technologies in the coming year.

In addition to energy generation, the article examines infrastructure, energy storage, distributed generation, public awareness, and social networks as communication tools...

Rescooped by Pepe Crespo from The Next Edge
Scoop.it!

Endgame of an Era

Endgame of an Era | Prionomy | Scoop.it

As a civilization we are in the throes of living out an "endgame." No, not the endgame of our species or any similar dire situation, but the endgame of an era. For many of us living in the developed nations, we are witnessing the endgame of the Second Industrial Revolution. Yet overall, this endgame concerns a way of living, a social-political model that has now come to the end of its life. Simply put, we cannot go on living as we have been for the past 150 years. Why 150 years? Well, this is roughly the time since oil was first discovered and utilized for fueling our rapid social expansion.

 

by Kingsley Dennis, Ph.D.

Sociologist, writer, co-founder of WorldShift International


Via ddrrnt
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pepe Crespo from The Next Edge
Scoop.it!

How solar power can help the billion people without electricity

How solar power can help the billion people without electricity | Prionomy | Scoop.it

One of the major opportunities lies in providing energy access for the more than 1.2 billion people who don't have electricity, most of whom, in business-as-usual scenarios, still won't have it in 2030. These are the poorest people on the planet. Ironically, the world's poorest can best afford the most sophisticated lighting — off-grid combinations of solar panels, power electronics, and LED lights. And this creates an opportunity for which the economics are compelling, the moral urgency profound, the development benefits enormous, and the potential leverage game changing.

 

The cost of coal and copper — the ingredients of conventional grid power — are soaring. Meanwhile, the cost of solar panels and LEDs, the ingredients of distributed renewable power, are racing down even faster.

 

If we want the poor to benefit from electricity we cannot wait for the grid, and we cannot rely on fossil fuels. The International Energy Agency, historically a grid-centric, establishment voice, admits that half of those without electricity today will never be wired. The government of India estimates that two-thirds of its non-electrified households need distributed power.


Via ddrrnt
more...
No comment yet.