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Curation: curator & curateur

Curation: curator & curateur | Prionomy | Scoop.it

Curation, curator et curateur sont les buzzword de ce début d'année. Est ce justifié ?

J’ai l’impression qu’après le web 2, le community management, etc., nous voici devant les termes qui mettent une dénomination sur les « bloggueurs influents » et autres influenceurs.

On constate que pour l’ensemble de ces termes « marketing » désignent des évolutions soit d’internet, soit de métiers existants… Aussi, faut-il suivre cette mode. Hier, nous étions tous community managers, demain, nous serons tous curateurs !


Via Giuseppe Mauriello, Alicia Cañellas
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Curators Key Requirement: Critical Thinking

Robin Good: Critical thinking is a key strategic skill needed by any serious professional curator. 

 

"Critical thinking provides the keys for our own intellectual independence..." and it helps to move away from "rashy conclusions, mystification and reluctance to question received wisdom, authority and tradition" while learning how to adopt "intellectual discipline" and a way to express clearly ideas while taking personal responsibility for them.

 

Key takeaways from this video:

 

Critical thinking refers to a diverse range of intellectual skills and activities concerned with "evaluating information" as well as our own thought in a disciplined way.
  Critical thinking is not just thinking a lot. To be an effective critical thinker you need to seek out and be guided by "knowledge" and "evidence" that fits with reality even if it refutes what the general consensus may want to believe.
  Critical thinkers cultivate an attitude of curiosity and they are willing to do the work required to keep themselves informed about a subject.
  Critical thinkers do not take claims at face value but utilize scepticism and doubt to suspend judgement and objectively evaluate with facts the claims being made.
  Critical thinkers should evaluate information on the basis of reasoning and not by relying on emotions as claims the factuality of a claim cannot be solely based on the level of emotion that accompanies them or the fact that they may be believed by certain groups.

 

Highly recommended for all curators. 9/10

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OLPL5p0fMg 

 


Via Robin Good, Miguel Higa
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Beth Kanter's comment, February 21, 2012 11:56 PM
Thank you for sharing this video and the importance of critical thinking. It is so easy to get into the mindless consumption trap and making ourselves slow down, read, think, question, and seek is so important. It is all about the resisting the urge to click, but to hit the pause button and make yourself think
Mayra Aixa Villar's comment, February 22, 2012 10:14 AM
Grazie come sempre, Robin! You always share valuable information and this video is a great source to reflect on the importance of critical thinking to refine thought processes when curating content. Content curation certainly requires and develops "better thinking".
Gregory Thackston's curator insight, March 17, 2013 4:54 PM

Critical thinking is a key component in addressing autonomous adversity and the need to collaborate in decision making.

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Content Curation - Best Practices | E-Learning Council

Content Curation - Best Practices | E-Learning Council | Prionomy | Scoop.it

Content Curation - Best Practices

 

Content curation has become a hot topic in 2012.

 

Corrine Weisgerber, an associate professor at St. Edwards University, has an excellent presentation on content curation.

 

She differentiates content curation from content aggregation--content aggregation can be automated but content curation requires the human touch for finding, evaluating and contextualizing information.

 

Gust MEES: Corinne is from Luxembourg (Europe), my country, don't know Luxembourg? Check out my curation about Luxembourg here: http://www.scoop.it/t/luxembourg-europe


Via Gust MEES, Paul Westeneng, Jose H. Flores
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Jenny Pesina's comment, January 12, 2012 4:28 PM
Great find, Gust - Corrine makes some great points on giving your own opinion on what you find and establishing a PLN. Really enjoyed this one, thanks!
Gust MEES's comment, January 12, 2012 5:39 PM
@JennyP,

Thanks Jenny, much appreciated your comment :)
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Credit and Attribution Are Fantastic Untapped Resources for Discovery, Not Duties: Maria Popova and The Curator's Code

Credit and Attribution Are Fantastic Untapped Resources for Discovery, Not Duties: Maria Popova and The Curator's Code | Prionomy | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Maria Popova has just launched a classy and laudable initiative, focused on increasing awareness and in highlighting the importance of honoring always where or via who you have got to a certain article, report, video or image.

 

Credit and attribution are not just a "formal" way to comply with rules, laws and authors but an incredibly powerful emebddable mechanism to augment findability, discovery, sinergy and collaboration among human being interested in the same topic.

 

She writes: "In an age of information overload, information discovery — the service of bringing to the public’s attention that which is interesting, meaningful, important, and otherwise worthy of our time and thought — is a form of creative and intellectual labor, and one of increasing importance and urgency.

 

A form of authorship, if you will.

 

Yet we don’t have a standardized system for honoring discovery the way we honor other forms of authorship and other modalities of creative and intellectual investment, from literary citations to Creative Commons image rights."

 

For this purpose Curator's Code was created.

 

Curator's Code is first of all "a movement to honor and standardize attribution of discovery across the web" as well as a web site where you can learn about the two key types of attribution that we should be using:

a) Via - which indicates a link of direct discovery

b) Hat tip - Indicates a link of indirect discovery, story lead, or inspiration.

 

Each one has now a peculiar characterizing icon that Curator's Code suggests to integrate in your news and content publication policies. 

 

Additionally and to make it easy for anyone to integrate these new attribution icons in their work, Curator's Code has created a free bokkmarklet which makes using proper attribution a matter of one clic.

 

Hat tip to Maria Popova and Curator's Code for launching this initiative. 

 

Whether or not you will sign Curator's Code pledge, become an official web site supporting it, or adopt its bookmarklet instantly is not as important as the key idea behind it: by providing credit and attribution to pieces of content you find elsewhere, you not only honestly reward who has spent time to create that content, but you significantly boost the opportunity for thousands of others to connect, link up to, discover and make greater sense of their search for meaning.

 

Read Maria Popova introductory article to Curator's Code: http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/03/09/curators-code/ ;

 

How to use the Curator's bookmarklet: http://vimeo.com/38243275 ;

 

Healthy. Inspiring. 9/10

 

Curator's Code official web site: http://curatorscode.org/ ;

 

This is very helpful and will share - thanks Robin!



***** Attribution is a bear for Internet marketers too. I'm signing and crediting curators such as Robin, maxOz, Mike, Susan and Anise is why I created the Content Curation Contest. Marty


Via Robin Good, Barbara Bray, Martin (Marty) Smith
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Beth Kanter's comment, March 11, 2012 1:01 PM
Thanks Robin for sharing and curating this article with your summary. I discovered it via Barbara Bray's collection where she had re scooped your scoop -- [and if following the curator's code added a via]. I came over here to rescoop (with a via!) because you are the original source and one of the links was broken (you corrected it and added an update) thus reminding me the importance of going to the original source. Here on scoop.it you can just follow the trail of the rescoop icon.

I am disappointed that the bookmarklet doesn't work together with the scoop.it one - but it would be great to have it integrated. Now to figure out how to rescoop it with the characters.
Robin Good's comment, March 11, 2012 1:12 PM
Hi Beth, thanks for your kind feedback. I was just out today for a video interview with Nancy White here in Rome, and she mentioned you as someone she likes for your ability to curate and make sense of things.

Re the integration of the curators' code icons, I have received feedback from Guillaume De Cugies of Scoop.it that he has been exchanging with Maria Popova and that he is looking with her for a way to integrate the two.

For now you can simply install the Curators' Code bookmarklet and use the "via"<a href="http://www.curatorscode.org" target="_blank" style="font-family:sans-serif;text-decoration:none" >&#x1525;</a> or hat tip <a href="http://www.curatorscode.org" target="_blank" style="font-family:sans-serif;text-decoration:none" >&#x21ac;</a> icons by copying and pasting their code into your scoops manually. The problem, at least for me is, that the scoop.it editing window is in the same position where the Curators' Code bookmarklet is and therefore I can't see both at the same time.

In any case I think it would be trivial for Scoop.it or any other tool to integrate such buttons directly into their system without having us to use two different tools for one task.
Karen Dietz's comment, March 11, 2012 9:36 PM
Many thanks Robin for the help! Somehow I missed the article -- computer fatigue probably :) I read it earlier today and look forward to using the codes. I'm thrilled to hear that scoop.it is looking into integrating them into the platform. Thanks for keeping us updated on this new, and important twist, for curating. Cheers -- Karen
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What's Behind The Pinterest Craze? 15 Super-Users Share Their Thoughts

What's Behind The Pinterest Craze? 15 Super-Users Share Their Thoughts | Prionomy | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Arik C. Hansen - he was fascinated by the growth of Pinterest in such a short time so he set out to ask 15 people that he refers to as "super users" what they like about Pinterest, how much time they spend on there per week, and more. In this piece, there are 13 people answering this question, I decided to answer it as well. Sorry it's so long, I got carried away:-)

 

Intro:

 

"It may be a niche social network, but Pinterest is growing like mad.

While other tools and networks like Quora, Instagram (my favorite) and Google Plus have stolen the headlines this year, Pinterest has quietly amassed a relatively huge user base–especially among young women (in my opinion)".

 

Here are some amazing statistics:

 

**From October 2010 to October 2011 Pinterest grew from just 40,000 users to a whopping 3.2 million. That’s some serious growth.

 

 **Pinterest adding thousands of users each month.

 

**Its users are also spending an inordinate amount of time on the site. And, this, at a time when EVERYONE is complaining about being social networked to death (see Google+).

 

**Several Pinterest users that claim they spend upwards of two hours A DAY on the site. Hmmm…sound familiar? Facebook’s entire MO (or at least their initial MO) comes down to finding ways to keep people on their site.

 

**Pinterest appears to have found the magic formula.

 

****But WHY is the site so damn popular? The author set out to discover. He

pegged 12 Pinterest “power users” and asked them 5 simple questions about their use, how brands might use the platform and the future of Pinterest 

 

My feedback:

 

Some of the people who commented didn't feel the people he interviewed were what they would consider "super users". I think the point here is that it gives you a birdseye view of some of how and why people are spending so much time on here. More information will follow as the site evolves.

 

My commentary:

 

I'm going to add my two cents here because I love Pinterest and this is my experience.

 

**It's an amazing platform to let others see me beyond my profile and business personna.  There's a story in the background about who I am as a person. This gives people points of connection where they can identify with me in business as well as through common interests. I had an experience today where I connected with someone on Facebook through an article I posted. They immediately went to twitter, came here, then to Pinterest. This person lives in another country, we've never spoken before but we spoke tonight and we're already talking about collaborating on a project.

 

****people do business with people they like and trust

 

**Pinterest allows me to be visually creative

 

**Pinterest allows me to fantisize about going to places all over the world by posting gorgeous images

 

**Pinterest allows me to dream and imagine my dream house

 

**Pinterest allows me to relax, it's not like any other enviornment 

 

**Pinterest allows me to find other people with common interests and sensibility

 

**Pinterest allows me to explore my creative side, bond with the painters and photographers and deepen my relationship with them

 

**Pinterest allows people to click only on things they're interested in and leave the rest

 

**Pinterest allows me to bring my marketing message in subtle ways by developing a relationship first, business second.

 

**Pinterest offers so many ways to promote and sell your products and services

 

I could go on and on, have you guessed, I love Pinterest!!

 

Selected by maxOz - curated by Jan Gordon covering "Pinterest Watch"

 

Read full article here [http://bit.ly/AfeVYK]


Via janlgordon
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janlgordon's comment, January 20, 2012 8:51 PM
maxOz
These articles are amazing - You are definitely my partner covering Pinterest Watch - Great teamwork!
maxOz's comment, January 20, 2012 9:58 PM
Jan, I'm so happy you like my suggestions xxx
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Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research]

Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research] | Prionomy | Scoop.it

Robin Good: The Institute for the Future and the University of Phoenix have teamed up to produce, this past spring, an interesting report entitled Future Work Skills 2020.

 

By looking at the set of emerging skills that this research identifies as vital for future workers, I can't avoid but recognize the very skillset needed by any professional curator or newsmaster.

 

It should only come as a limited surprise to realize that in an information economy, the most valuable skills are those that can harness that primary resource, "information", in new, and immediately useful ways.

 

And being the nature of information like water, which can adapt and flow depending on context, the task of the curator is one of seeing beyond the water,

to the unique rare fish swimming through it.

 

The curator's key talent being the one of recognizing that depending on who you are fishing for, the kind of fish you and other curators could see within the same water pool, may be very different. 

 

 

Here the skills that information-fishermen of the future will need the most:

 

1) Sense-making:

ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed

 

2) Social intelligence:

ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions

 

3) Novel and adaptive thinking:

proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based

 

4) Cross-cultural competency:

ability to operate in different cultural settings

 

5) Computational thinking:

ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning

 

6) New media literacy:

ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication

 

7) Transdisciplinarity:

literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines

 

8) Design mindset:

ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes

 

9) Cognitive load management:

ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques

 

10) Virtual collaboration:

ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team

 

 

Critical to understand the future ahead. 9/10

 

Curated by Robin Good

 

Executive Summary of the Report: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-work-skills-executive-summary.pdf&amp;nbsp;

 

Download a PDF copy of Future Work Skills 2020: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-skills-2020-research-report.pdf&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;


Via Robin Good, janlgordon, Tom George
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Beth Kanter's comment, December 20, 2011 7:34 PM
Thanks for sharing this from Robin's stream. These skills sets could form the basis of a self-assessment for would-be curators, although they're more conceptual - than practical/tactical. Thanks for sharing and must go rescoop it with a credit you and Robin of course
janlgordon's comment, December 20, 2011 7:56 PM
Beth Kanter
Agreed. It's also one of the articles I told you about....good info to build on:-)
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 4, 2014 2:34 AM

Curating Information and Data Sense-Making Is The Key Skill for the Future [Research]