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Henkel makes strategic equity investment in Vitriflex, Inc - Printed Electronics World

Henkel makes strategic equity investment in Vitriflex, Inc
Printed Electronics World
Founded in 2010, San Jose, California-based Vitriflex, Inc. is a leading developer of high-performance barrier films for flexible electronics.
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StoreDot's Next Generation Smartphone Battery Fully Charges A Mobile in Just 30 Seconds

StoreDot's ground-breaking, inspired by nature-technology, enables smartphone battery to charge in just 30-seconds; company says more nanotechnology enhanced devices coming soon.
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New award for Plastic Logic and ISORG's sensor - Printed Electronics World

New award for Plastic Logic and ISORG's sensor
Printed Electronics World
Plastic Logic and ISORG were jointly awarded the IDTechEx Product development award at the Printed Electronics Show in Berlin.
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Ultrathin Layers Made Of Tungsten And Selenium May Be Used As Flexible ... - RedOrbit

Ultrathin Layers Made Of Tungsten And Selenium May Be Used As Flexible ... - RedOrbit | Printed Electronics | Scoop.it
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Ultrathin Layers Made Of Tungsten And Selenium May Be Used As Flexible ...
RedOrbit
Organic materials are also used for opto-electronic applications, but they age rather quickly.
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3D-printed 'electronic glove' could help keep your heart beating for ever - Irish Independent

3D-printed 'electronic glove' could help keep your heart beating for ever - Irish Independent | Printed Electronics | Scoop.it
3D-printed 'electronic glove' could help keep your heart beating for ever Irish Independent The device uses a “spider-web-like network of sensors and electrodes” to continuously monitor the heart's electrical activity and could, in the future,...
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LG Display details their flexible OLED process, expects the flexible OLED market to reach $41 billion by 2020

LG Display details their flexible OLED process, expects the flexible OLED market to reach $41 billion by 2020 | Printed Electronics | Scoop.it
LG Display posted a very interesting article explaining their flexible OLEDs, and giving some predictions (based on IHS DisplayBank estimates) about the flexible OLED market. A couple of months ago LG already stated that they see a very bright future for flexible OLEDs and they intend to take the lead in this emerging display market. So first of all, LGD explains the structure of their flexible OLED panel (see below). It is based on a plastic (polyimide) substrate as we already know, and LG gives some more information about their Face Seal method which was discussed before but with very little details.
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UDC and IDD Aerospace demonstrate an OLED lighting prototype for aircraft interiors

UDC and IDD Aerospace demonstrate an OLED lighting prototype for aircraft interiors | Printed Electronics | Scoop.it

In May 2013, the US DOE granted a $225,000 project to Universal Display and IDD Aerospace to develop a low-energy shelf phosphorescent OLED light targeted at aircraft interiors. A few days ago, the two companies exhibited a prototype panel at the DOE's SSL R&D Workshop.The OLED prototype shown at the workshop is a shelf utility panel that is very slim and energy efficient. The two companies believe that the data generated by developing this shelf utility light may be applied to larger-scale OLED lighting aircraft projects, including cabin applications for interior furniture, galley, interior structure enhancements, as well as other potential adoptions in cabin accent, task, ceiling and sidewall lighting, and sign backlighting.

 

UDC says that an OLED panel has several advantages over current fluorescent or LED technologies - from reducing an aircraft’s carbon footprint, lowering fuel consumption to opening up the design restrictions of current lighting solutions."

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Nanotechnology primer: graphene - properties, uses and applications

Nanotechnology primer: graphene - properties, uses and applications | Printed Electronics | Scoop.it
Graphene is undoubtedly emerging as one of the most promising nanomaterials because of its unique combination of superb properties, which opens a way for its exploitation in a wide spectrum of applications ranging from electronics to optics,...
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iPhone 6 to feature solar-charging sapphire glass screen: Report - NDTV

iPhone 6 to feature solar-charging sapphire glass screen: Report - NDTV | Printed Electronics | Scoop.it
NDTV
iPhone 6 to feature solar-charging sapphire glass screen: Report
NDTV
For the latest technology news and reviews, like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter and get the NDTV Gadgets app for Android or iOS.
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NUS & BASF To Use Graphene In Organic Electronic Devices

NUS & BASF To Use Graphene In Organic Electronic Devices | Printed Electronics | Scoop.it
Researchers at NUS and BASF will jointly develop the use of graphene in organic electronic devices such as organic light emitting diodes.
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MIT researchers clarify things with new transparent display technology

MIT researchers clarify things with new transparent display technology | Printed Electronics | Scoop.it
Most current transparent display technologies are limited in terms of viewing angle. Now researchers at MIT have come up with a new system that is low-cost ...
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Kateeva expands their Korean operation

Kateeva expands their Korean operation | Printed Electronics | Scoop.it
Kateeva announced that the company is expanding its Korea operation, by absorbing the assets of Seoul-based OLED Plus - an OLED equipment design, sales, service and support company headed by OLED industry veteran, KB (Kyung Bin) Bae, who will...
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iSuppli: the OLED TV market is finally beginning, shipments will reach 10 million in 2018

iSuppli: the OLED TV market is finally beginning, shipments will reach 10 million in 2018 | Printed Electronics | Scoop.it
Market research firm iSuppli expects the OLED TV market to grow quickly in coming years.
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New Energy's Validated SolarWindow Sets New Record for Generating Electricity While Remaining See-Through

More than 50 percent greater power than prior attempts publicized by others
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Optomec Adds Advanced Packaging Systems to Printed Electronics Lineup

Aerosol Jet micro-dispense systems enable production of miniaturized electronic devices
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Bayer Transfers CNT, Graphene IP, Patents and Technology to FutureCarbon

Bayer sells patents for carbon nanotubes and graphenes
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Conductive nanomaterials for printed electronics applications

Conductive nanomaterials for printed electronics applications | Printed Electronics | Scoop.it
The term printed electronics refers to the application of printing technologies for the fabrication of electronic circuits and devices, increasingly on flexible plastic or paper substrates. Traditionally, electronic devices are mainly manufactured by photolithography, vacuum deposition, and electroless plating processes. In contrast to these multistaged, expensive, and wasteful methods, inkjet printing offers a rapid and cheap way of printing electrical circuits with commodity inkjet printers and off-the-shelf materials.
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Plastic Logic, ISORG Claim Prestigious FLEXI Award for Revolutionary Flexible Plastic Image Sensor

Opens up possibilities for a range of new applications
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New GO-based drug release technique could be useful for epilepsy treatment

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and the Qingdao University of Science and Technology are studying drug delivery systems based on graphene oxide nanocomposite films. They found a way to consistently release anti-inflammatory drugs by applying electricity. Such a technique can be useful to treat epilepsy for example - when medication is "waiting inside the body" and will only be released when a seizure starts.The researchers are using polymer thin films covered with GO nanosheets. They then coat it with an anti-inflammatory drug. This structure is then coated on an electrode. Applying electric current to the electrode causes it to release the drug. By changing the size and thickness of the GO sheets, the researchers can control how much drug is carried.
Paul Williams's insight:

Stretching the "Printed Electronics" definition a little maybe but still a cool concept.

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Samsung invests in XG Sciences, to co-develop graphene-based batteries

XG Sciences announced that Samsung Ventures placed a strategic investment in the company. XGS did not disclose the terms of the investment, but they said that it will be used to "fund additional research and development of the company’s advanced materials".XG Sciences also plans to formalize their development work with Samsung SDI (the world's largest Li-Ion battery maker) in a joint development program aimed at next-generation batteries for consumer electronics and other devices.
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Richard Platt's curator insight, February 2, 2014 4:53 AM

Samsung invests in XG Sciences, to co-develop graphene-based batteries

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Interview: Davor Sutija Talks About Printed Electronics | Embedded content from Electronic Design

Interview: Davor Sutija Talks About Printed Electronics | Embedded content from Electronic Design | Printed Electronics | Scoop.it
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Tuning the Colour of OLEDs - Novus Light Technologies Today

Tuning the Colour of OLEDs - Novus Light Technologies Today | Printed Electronics | Scoop.it
Tuning the Colour of OLEDs
Novus Light Technologies Today
Organic light emitting diodes (OLED) recently entered the commercial product market a few years ago, and in that short time, OLED has rapidly expanded its scope of use.
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Stretchable electronics: A gel that is clearly revolutionary

Stretchable electronics: A gel that is clearly revolutionary | Printed Electronics | Scoop.it
Researchers are determined to manufacture stretchable biomedical devices that interface directly with organs such as the skin, heart and brain. Electronic devices, however, are usually made from hard materials that are incompatible with soft tissue.
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Scientists 'print' new eye cells

Scientists 'print' new eye cells | Printed Electronics | Scoop.it

Scientists say they have been able to successfully print new eye cells that could be used to treat sight loss. The proof-of-principle work in the journal Biofabrication was carried out using animal cells.

 

The Cambridge University team says it paves the way for grow-your-own therapies for people with damage to the light-sensitive layer of tissue at back of the eye - the retina. More tests are needed before human trials can begin.

 

Co-authors of the study Prof Keith Martin and Dr Barbara Lorber, from the John van Geest Centre for Brain Repair at the University of Cambridge, said: "The loss of nerve cells in the retina is a feature of many blinding eye diseases. The retina is an exquisitely organised structure where the precise arrangement of cells in relation to one another is critical for effective visual function.

 

"Our study has shown, for the first time, that cells derived from the mature central nervous system, the eye, can be printed using a piezoelectric inkjet printer. Although our results are preliminary and much more work is still required, the aim is to develop this technology for use in retinal repair in the future."

 

They now plan to attempt to print other types of retinal cells, including the light-sensitive photoreceptors - rods and cones.

 

Scientists have already been able to reverse blindness in mice using stem cell transplants. And there is promising work into electronic retina implants implants in patients.

 

Clara Eaglen, of the RNIB, said: "This is a step in the right direction as the retina is often affected in many of the common eye conditions, causing loss of central vision which stops people watching TV and seeing the faces of loved ones."

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Samuel H. Kenyon, trendspotter, Richard Platt
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Richard Platt's curator insight, January 13, 2014 5:17 PM

Wow biotech just cooler in my eyes, (excuse the pun)