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Follow the Things

"Who makes the things that we buy?  Few of us know. They seem untouched by human hands. Occasionally there's a news story, a documentary film, or an artwork showing the hidden ingredients in our coffee, t-shirts, or iPads. They often 'expose' unpleasant working conditions to encourage more 'ethical' consumer or corporate behaviour. followthethings.com is this work's 'online store'. Here you can find out who has followed what, why and how; the techniques used to 'grab' its audiences; the discussions and impacts that this has provoked; and how to follow things yourself."
Via Seth Dixon
Fran Martin's insight:

Great website by colleague Ian Cook at Exeter University

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2013 4:31 PM

Where did your T-Shirt come from?   Where did the food your parents bought at the grocery store come from?  What's the origin of the components in your cell phone?  These questions all allude to what geographers call a commodity chain analysis.  Analyzing where the consumer goods that we use every day came from can make global issues hit a little closer to home and reinforce concepts such as globalization. The website Follow the Things is a great resource for teaching students about commodity chains and mapping out your own personal geographies.


Tags: industry, economic, globalization, consumption.

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, September 10, 2013 3:56 AM

About Globalisation, flows and production today. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:32 PM

Where did your T-Shirt come from?   Where did the food your parents bought at the grocery store come from?  What's the origin of the components in your cell phone?  These questions all allude to what geographers call a commodity chain analysis.  Analyzing where the consumer goods that we use every day came from can make global issues hit a little closer to home and reinforce concepts such as globalization. The website Follow the Things is a great resource for learning  about commodity chains and mapping out your own personal geographies.

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What makes a great (history) teacher? - History lessons and resources for schools

I have been pondering this question lately: what makes a great history teacher? By lately I mean for the last 19 years  or so… and probably will continue to ponder for the next 20 to 30 years, God willing! Lots of people seem to be experts on this subject, clever clog bloggers all over the …
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Another great resource for developing exciting, enquiry-based history lessons. 

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Oxfam GB :: leading UK charity fighting global poverty

Oxfam GB :: leading UK charity fighting global poverty | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
  In the summer of 2011, we asked people visiting the Eden Project in Cornwall, England to write postcards. The architecture of its biodomes, the placement of plants within them, and the signs and activities explaining their cultivation and
Fran Martin's insight:

This is a really interesting global learning initiative led by colleague Ian Cook (Exeter Uni, Geography department). Scroll down for the primary resource pack (7-11 yrs). Share with your teachers at school.

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The word-hoard: Robert Macfarlane on rewilding our language of landscape

The word-hoard: Robert Macfarlane on rewilding our language of landscape | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
For decades the leading nature writer has been collecting unusual words for landscapes and natural phenomena – from aquabob to zawn. It’s a lexicon we need to cherish in an age when a junior dictionary finds room for ‘broadband’ but has no place for ‘bluebell’
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Really interesting on relationship between language and landscape. Could be useful for Totnes

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We’re Not As Big As We Think We Are

We’re Not As Big As We Think We Are | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
 When I look at most maps of the world, I see Canada as a big friendly giant beaming down on the little countries spread out below us. We are a benign, placid, peaceful country — but big. If Canada was six-food-two, say, then the [...]
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Forget the photo of Brad Pitt! This is actually a really interesting blog post on the difficulties of 2D maps of the world as representations (or not) of reality.

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Storyline Online - Where Reading Is Fun!

Storyline Online - Where Reading Is Fun! | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
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Looks like a fun and useful resource to support use of story in humanities teaching

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Creative Teaching and Learning Blog: Activities for outdoor learning this Autumn

Creative Teaching and Learning Blog: Activities for outdoor learning this Autumn | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
A range of outdoor activity ideas, resources and online games to help your kids learn about and enjoy the natural world this Autumn.
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#hums2014 a useful resource for outdoor learning activities

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Teachers TV 3500 videos plus articles, ideas and advice | Free | Good to outstanding.

Teachers TV 3500 videos plus articles, ideas and advice | Free | Good to outstanding. | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
Education video resources, lesson plans, inspiration and ideas to use in classroom. Professional development, CPD and training for everyone working in schools.
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You have to sign up but this is a free resource with many of the programmes that were on Teachers TV before it was closed. Well worth a browse by subject and age group. Each programme is 10-15 minutes usually. A great source of ideas.

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Ofsted | Good practice resource - Developing outstanding historical thinking in primary schools: Fox Primary School

Ofsted | Good practice resource - Developing outstanding historical thinking in primary schools: Fox Primary School | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
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Seven Steps to Becoming a Spontaneous Explorer of the World

Seven Steps to Becoming a Spontaneous Explorer of the World | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
Greetings future explorer of the world! In this post we will be introducing you to Spontaneity and his mischievous cousin Serendipity.* They have faithfully accompanied many great explorers throughout the ages and we can guarantee that...
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Thanks to Paula Owens of the geographical Association for alerting me to this. Looks fun!

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Project Wild Thing – Reconnecting kids with nature – Project Wild Thing

Project Wild Thing – Reconnecting kids with nature – Project Wild Thing | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
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This looks interesting for those of you who think children need reconnecting with nature. Useful addition to our Forest School and Dawlish Warren experiences.

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2014 Curriculum guidance for teaching Stone Age to Iron Age

2014 Curriculum guidance for teaching Stone Age to Iron Age | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
Guidance for approach to teaching Stone Age to Iron Age in the key stage 2 history curriculum post September 2014
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Welcome | GeogSpace

Welcome | GeogSpace | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
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A support site for teachers in Victoria for the new Australian curriculum, but with lots of ideas and resources that will be as suitable for the English primary curriculum.

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Difference Differently

Difference Differently | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
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Watch the Video on the front page and then explore the site to consider how the humanities can contribute to educating for positive attitudes towards difference.

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10 Apps for Teaching History

10 Apps for Teaching History | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
We’ve been taking a look at the pick of the latest apps for teaching history, both of Britain and beyond:
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Does what it says on the tin! Explore!

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Curriculum & Assessment Resources

Curriculum & Assessment Resources | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
In an attempt to rationalise my collections of resources, I'm going to try to post all of the various things I've shared here on a central page. Please feel free to download and share them with pri...
Fran Martin's insight:

Thanks to Jane H for alerting me to this. Mike Tidd provides some really useful frameworks for integrated planning and recording of assessments, and some succinct History 'cheat' sheets that provide the essential features of different units in the new History curriculum for KS2.

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It's Our World

It's Our World | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
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Thanks to a colleague to alerting me to this. 

An art/science/geography project. Lots of potential for a one-off lesson or a series of learning events!
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Nursery rhymes from all over the world – a gallery to share with children

Nursery rhymes from all over the world – a gallery to share with children | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
Nursery rhymes pass down to all of us. Wherever we live these rhymes sow the seeds of a delight in language and stories. This beautiful gallery celebrates the diverse voices that speak to children in verse with illustrations by 77 international artists, collected together in Elizabeth Hammill’s new anthology Over the Hills and Far Away
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Maps on the Web : Photo

Post anything (from anywhere!), customize everything, and find and follow what you love. Create your own Tumblr blog today.
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Just a bit of fun - but also interesting in terms of how we are all connected.

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The Language of Maps Kids Should Know

The Language of Maps Kids Should Know | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
Though in the age of iPhones and GPSs we seem to be losing paper maps, I still love exploring maps, and believe kids need to learn map skills, and develop their geography awareness.  Because of thi...
Fran Martin's insight:

Interesting points and ideas for activities that demonstrate the importance of continuing to use and explore maps through a range of media (paper, globes, modelling clay ...) in addition to those available through electronic media. 

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Mr P's ICT blog - iPads in the Classroom: Using Disney Films for Geography!

Mr P's ICT blog - iPads in the Classroom: Using Disney Films for Geography! | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
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Nice lesson idea for teaching locational knowledge

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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, October 7, 2014 11:27 PM

So being a huge Disney fan, I had to go looking for something that correlated Disney and geography. I found a blog used by an school teacher and found his lesson to be rather interesting. I think it is actually amazing that this teacher taught his students countries on the map and correlated it with Disney movies. Before the students even looked at a map, he first had them make a list of all the Disney movies they could think of. Next they discussed the origins of some of the stories, which lead to where the stories took place. He then shared a map with the students and had them make guesses about where they thought each story was set. Finally, they were allowed to get an Ipad and look up the answers. I thought this lesson was super creative, especially in a way that made it fun for the students. Not many students just like to memorize a map of countries on countries. But this teacher made it fun for them and I think it was probably easier for them to remember since it was correlated with some of their favorite Disney stories. The teacher, "Mr P.", says that "it gave the children a nice way to link some of their favourite films and deepen their understanding of names and locations of countries around the world" and I couldn't agree more. You can catch me adding this to my lesson plans!

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The People’s Guide to Spatial Thinking

The People’s Guide to Spatial Thinking | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it

"One of our colleagues and leaders in spatial thinking in education, Dr. Diana Stuart Sinton, has written a book entitled The People’s Guide to Spatial Thinking, along with colleagues Sarah Bednarz, Phil Gersmehl, Robert Kolvoord, and David Uttal.  As the name implies, the book provides an accessible and readable way for students, educators, and even the general public to understand what spatial thinking is and why it matters.  It “help[s] us think across the geographies of our life spaces, physical and social spaces, and intellectual space.”  Dr. Sinton pulls selections from the NRC’s Learning to Think Spatially report and ties them to everyday life.  In so doing, she also provides ways for us in the educational community to think about teaching these concepts and skills in a variety of courses.   Indeed, as she points out, spatial thinking is particularly essential within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, as well as geography."  - See more at: ESRI's GIS Education Community blog. 


Via Seth Dixon
Fran Martin's insight:

Useful for what we mean when we say 'thinking geographically'.

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Lawrence Lanoff's curator insight, January 27, 2014 6:25 PM

This is so interesting because how we represent space makes such a difference to our inner sense of well being in my experience and practice.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 2014 6:17 PM

Educação geográfica! 

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, February 2, 2014 7:02 PM

Guía popular de pensamiento espacial.

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Mission:Explore It's adventure but not as you know it

Mission:Explore It's adventure but not as you know it | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
There are two aims to the game. One is to collect points and unlock rewards. The other is to experience the world in new ways by doing vitally important random and warped challenges.
Fran Martin's insight:

Mission Explore is an exciting approach to geography developed by a group of teachers called "The Geography Collective". Although aimed more at secondary pupils, there are loads of ideas that could be adapted for primary pupils. I've just done a quick search and there are materials about exploring in Devon - register (I think it's free) and start exploring!

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Sshh, this new primary history curriculum is really rather good

Sshh, this new primary history curriculum is really rather good | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
Despite earlier controversies, Tim Taylor thinks the new primary history curriculum is both flexible and clear
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Interesting views on the New History Curriculum in The Guardian
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Computer Programming Used To Be Women’s Work

Computer Programming Used To Be Women’s Work | Primary Humanities | Scoop.it
Today, computer programmers are expected to be male, nerdy and antisocial - an odd, and self fulfilling prophesy that forgets the women that the entire field was built upon

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 8, 2013 11:59 AM

This article highlights how notions of gender and gender roles are culturally mediated and change over time. 

Ashley Raposo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:56 PM

Computor programming was thought to be a woman's job, just like making your home work you can make a computer work. But when Men of the time saw this area of careers controlled by women they made it so tests for this career were targeted for men to pass. Now it is a science far from being it's once woman oriented path. Gender inequality is very simple to see in the eyes of a computer programmer.

Sarah Ziolkowski's curator insight, January 1, 2014 6:33 PM

This article applies to the  gender cultural differences sub unit. This article focuses on the change in gender roles in the computer software industry. An industry that males dominate today, was actually once considered a job for women. This wasn't becauseof gender equality, but that the cultural values for gender placed computer software as a job for women.  The few men in the computer industry put a lot of effort into taking women out of that work, and succeeded, completely changing the workforce in the computer software industry. This is a great example of cultural differences in our society and how much it can affect us.