Australian children's human rights issues- Stage 3
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UNICEF - Photo Essays - In your classroom

UNICEF - Photo Essays - In your classroom | Australian children's human rights issues- Stage 3 | Scoop.it
Jessica Metcalfe's insight:

The UNICEF website has a variety of fabulous resources that students and teachers can access that deal with human rights. In particular the photo essay section that relates to children's rights is a great resource that can be adapted into a Stage 3 lesson while addressing outcome CCS3.2 Explains the development of the principles of Australian democracy (BOS, 1998), looking at children's rights in particular.


As a whole class look at some of the photo essays that children have published on UNICEF's website. Discuss with students how the human right has been depicted by the student and ask them to think and discuss if it is similar to our human rights in Australia or how it might differ? Then using UNICEFS's simplified version of the rights of the child ask students to choose one children's right and create an artwork or find a photograph that represents their chosen human right. The teacher can then collate all the student's work to make a gallery of images to further represent their depiction of children's human rights.


This resource provides students with not only knowledge about human rights but also the mechanisms to help develop skills to promote and apply human rights to their own lives (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). They are provided with the opportunity to consider how the images from around the world apply to their own lives. As a result they can appreciate how fortunate they are to have their basic human rights met on a daily basis and start to think about what they can do to help others who aren't as fortunate.

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S. Retrieved from http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/
Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Archie Roach 'Took the children away'- Addressing human rights issues for the 'Stolen Generation'

Archie Roach is an icon of the Australian music industry and his honest storytelling tells the sad truth of indigenous Australia. He wrote the landmark song ...
Jessica Metcalfe's insight:

The YouTube clip "took the children away" tells the song and story by Archie Roach about the 'Stolen Generation' and how Aboriginal peoples rights have been abused over the years. It is a moving indictment about the treatment of Aboriginal children from the 'Stolen Generation' and has been very influential not only among the Aboriginal community but also nationally and internationally. Having been awarded an International Human Rights Achievement Award and being the first of its kind, I think it is a very appropriate resource to educate a Stage 3 class about Australian Human Right issues. This resource uses the first approach to human rights education which involves first studying the violations of human rights by focusing on the displacement of Indigenous through the 'Stolen Generation' (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).


The video itself only features the lyrics being sung, which depicts the story of Indigenous children of the "Stolen Generation". I specifically chose this version as I would like students to focus more on the lyrical value of the song and consider what the artist is portraying through the music. Other videos I considered using displayed images that generalised, as a result I decided to use this video so students perceptions are not distorted by any accompanying images. I would ask students while listening to keep in mind what they have been learning about human rights and to consider how they might relate to what the indigenous community experienced due to the 'Stolen Generation'.


Students would be provided with a copy of UNICEF's Children's Human Rights and a copy of the lyrics to "took the children away". Ask students to work in small groups to discuss what human rights have been abused through the treatment of the 'Stolen Generation' and what impact might this have on the Indigenous population of today's society. Get students to mind-map their ideas which will be shared as a whole class. Ask students to consider facts such as how the lack of citizenship rights for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples may have contributed to other human rights abuses including the forcible removal of children from their families leading to the Stolen Generations, poor pay and working conditions, lack of property rights and voting rights. It is assumed students have knowledge of Australia's Indigenous history being in Stage 3. However, another resource that can be used alongside the YouTube clip to support children’s learning would be the picture book "Took the Children Away", which is based on the song written by Archie Roach and illustrated by his late wife Ruby Hunter. It will provide students with a visual representation of the lyrics.


As the song deals with both past and present issues Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are facing, students are able to develop an awareness of the struggles and fight that cultures can face, which assists them in making meaning from the song (Browett, 2002). By studying and making meaning from the lyrics students are working towards being able to express their views in written form, which is an important critical literacy skill (Winch, 2011). Through using this resource they are also identifying Indigenous Australian human rights issues in society both past and present, thus learning about outcome CCS3.2 explains the development of the principles of Australian democracy (BOS, 1998).


REFERENCES:
Board of Studies NSW (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S. Retrieved from http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/
Browett, J. (2002). Critical literacy and visual texts: Windows on culture. School of Education, University of Tasmania. Launceston
Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Picture book for Human Rights Education

Picture book for Human Rights Education | Australian children's human rights issues- Stage 3 | Scoop.it
Jessica Metcalfe's insight:

The children’s book, 'We are all born free', is produced by Amnesty International. It is a book that depicts the ‘The Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Pictures’, in a creative light which is suitable for children and encourages students thinking and learning about human rights and issues for both humans and animals in the past and present. This resource could be used as an introduction to address the meaning of what a human right is with students.

 

Teachers could extend students learning by pairing students and getting them to work on one human right each from the book. They could discuss illustrations and how they link to their particular human right and whether they depict the people in a positive light where rights are respected or if they are negatively represented. The students could then present their picture to the class, sharing their views on their work. This would also allow the teacher time to assess the students understanding of rights and develop ideas for future learning experiences.

 

We are all born free is a fantastic resource and can be used across curriculum stages. One of its strengths is that the pictures as well as words are designed to convey messages that "mean" (Winch, 2010). In today's semiotic world children's understanding about how pictures can work with and against the text, allows them to further develop their visual literacy. We are all born free enables students to envision human rights through the pictures and develop an understanding of how the images depict issues of human rights in today's society. This is as Winch describes "an increasingly important literacy in a world of diverse textual communications" (2010, p.602).

 

References:
Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press

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Educational, interactive game to help humanitarian effort

Educational, interactive game to help humanitarian effort | Australian children's human rights issues- Stage 3 | Scoop.it
For every correct answer you choose, 10 grains of rice are raised to help end world hunger through the World Food Programme.
Jessica Metcalfe's insight:

This is an interactive resource that deals with a global perspective that students can use to help out in the humanitarian effort to assist those in need around the world. The online activity is a transformative and empowerment approach to learning that provides opportunities for students to not only learn but do something to help those whose human rights are not being met (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011). Freerice is a non-profit website that is owned by and supports the United Nations World Food Programme. The sites two main goals are to provide education to everyone for free, therefore adhering to the declaration of human rights and to help end world hunger by providing rice to people in need for free.


It is a fabulous resource as it is easy to use and has a variety of subjects such as English, Maths, Humanities, Sciences, etc. It is also great as it caters for differing abilities if you get a question right you get a harder question and if you get a question incorrect you get an easier question. Therefore students of all age groups including my focus area of Stage 3 can use the resource. For each answer you get right, 10 grains of rice is donated to the United Nations World Food Program.


This global approach to helping others takes human rights rights education to a whole new level as students are literally helping as they learn. This online resource is a basic way to show students how to make a difference and assist in developing the skills needed to promote, defend and apply human rights to daily life (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). As a teacher I would extend on this activity by asking my class how we might be able to defend and promote children's human right issues in the school and community and also on a national and global scale. It would be an ongoing project by creating an action plan for how we as a class can make a difference by bettering the lives for other children.

 

References:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Behind the News- Children's Rights

Behind the News- Children's Rights | Australian children's human rights issues- Stage 3 | Scoop.it
As a kid, it's easy to think you just have to do what you're told most of the time. But you do actually have a set of rights; things you can expect no matter what. Universal Children’s Day is on this week and it's your chance to celebrate those rights. But it's also a time to think of those kids around the world who aren't so fortunate. Let's take a look.
Jessica Metcalfe's insight:

This Behind the News episode focuses on the rights of children from a global perspective. It discusses what life is like for children in Australia and how a usual day is usually filled with play, water, food, schoolwork, etc which are all rights of children. It then compares Australian children’s lives to those of children in Thailand, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, and how their human rights are not always met, particularly focusing on the right of to education. The use of media text such as Behind the News assists children to construct a reality and visually engage in a topic creating interest for students (Winch, 2010).


This particular episode deals with children's rights around the world and how Australia is remarkably lucky when it comes to our basic rights being met such as the right to food, water, shelter, education, etc. It is a successful resource in enabling students to recognise that this is not the case for all children around the world. Students are able to relate to current issues in society where children's rights to education are not being met for example in Bangladesh. It also demonstrates what children are doing around the world to improve their own and others rights to education.


After viewing the Behind the News episode teachers could engage students in a class discussion by asking why children need to be safe and healthy to develop to their pull potential and compare the similarities and differences in the student’s responses. Teachers could also ask students a variety of questions to get them thinking about human rights, such as:  what they think is the most important right for all children and why? What rights do children in Australia take for granted? Whose responsibility is it to make sure children have their rights met? This enables students to recognise international organisations that are responsible for their rights and the rights of children around the world, thus increasing their understanding of global awareness and who is responsible for upholding the rights of children as well as family, communities, governments, etc.

 

References:
Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press

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