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Rescooped by Catherine Smyth from History teaching in the primary classroom
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The Australian Curriculum v3.0 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures

The Australian Curriculum v3.0 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are strong, rich and diverse. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Identity is central to this priority and is intrinsically linked to living, learning Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, deep knowledge traditions and holistic world view.

A conceptual framework based on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ unique sense of Identity has been developed as a structural tool for the embedding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures within the Australian curriculum. This sense of Identity is approached through the interconnected aspects of Country/Place, People and Culture. Embracing these elements enhances all areas of the curriculum.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander priority provides opportunities for all learners to deepen their knowledge of Australia by engaging with the world’s oldest continuous living cultures. This knowledge and understanding will enrich their ability to participate positively in the ongoing development of Australia.


Via Maree Whiteley, Catherine Smyth
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Primary teachers need to embed Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives in their teaching. Use the ideas in this website to frame planning.

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Clare O'Connor's curator insight, April 1, 2013 11:32 PM

This is going to be a Cross-curricular priority, so I thought it useful to add for our RMLP teachers and in-house education providers.

Greta Brewin's curator insight, October 31, 2013 12:17 AM

I thought it would be a really helpful resource to store a direct link to the cross-curriculum priorities page on the ACARA website. This links to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders histories and cultures cross-curricular priority information page. As teachers you need to link you lesson and unit plans to the Australian Curriculum, and anything that falls under this priority can be justified as a viable learning outcome, because of the priority. Which I think is great, students and teachers need to learn about our indigenous history. 

Primary history- The Australian Colonies
Resources, links and ideas for teaching the Australian curriculum:history Stage 3 topic 'The Australian Colonies'. In this topic, students learn about the significance of people, groups, places and events to the development of Australia. They explore different experiences of people living in Australia over time and apply a variety of skills of historical inquiry and communication.
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Rescooped by Catherine Smyth from History teaching in the primary classroom
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Primary History- Developing Enquiry Skills

Primary History- Developing Enquiry Skills | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it

Primary teachers may be familiar with an inquiry process but less so with HISTORICAL INQUIRY. 

This British website draws on pedagogical research and explores how teachers can develop historical understanding in their classroom. The "Enquiry discussion" section is particularly useful.


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Eureka Stockade

Eureka Stockade | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
Today is a significant day and not just because it's the last BtN of the year. It's also the anniversary of a very famous event in Australia's history called the Eureka Stockade. Sarah visited Ballarat in Victoria to find out what it was and why it's so important.

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Laura Griffiths's curator insight, April 6, 12:03 AM

A significant incident during the Australian gold rush period was the Eureka stockade and today, it is recognised as being an event that shaped Australia’s political landscape. This BtN report covers the importance of the Eureka Stockade not only for the miners during the 1850s but its continuing effect on Australia’s democracy. Educational television programs like BtN have been recognised as effective resources teachers can utilise as they raise current problems and issues, have the ability to stimulate student curiosity and allows for discussion (Marsh, 2010, p. 247).

 

This BtN report would be appropriate to show to students within the classroom due to its comprehensible information and its engaging and entertaining format. It would be beneficial for teachers to use this clip as a foundation and an introductory activity on the importance of the Eureka stockade and its effect on Australia’s political landscape. Students should watch the clip twice – firstly as enjoyment and secondly to record information relevant for follow up discussion and activities. A scaffold should be provided for students while watching the video so they know what they should be listening to. After watching the clip twice, teachers should instigate a discussion identifying what students learnt from the video and what they have written in the scaffold. The BtN website provides questions that teachers can draw upon to discuss the Eureka Stockade Report. However, teachers should also provide discussion points and questions to link the Eureka stockade and its effect on shaping Australia as a democracy and Australia’s identity. It is important that teachers have a discussion after viewing this news report because it allows teachers to identify if students understood the information presented, assess if students were listening as well as receive an indication if further clarification is needed on particular aspects. If students do require more explanation, the website provides other links teachers and students can access for more information. Linked websites include the Museum of Australian Democracy Eureka website, Australian Government website on the Eureka Stockade and the State Library of Victoria website.

 

Reference: 

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a teacher: Knowledge, skills and issues. Frenchs Forrest: Pearsons.

Rescooped by Catherine Smyth from Origins of words and places
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A History of Sydney Streets - YouTube

Historians Dr Shirley Fitzgerald and Dr Lisa Murray chat about the evolution of Sydney's streets and their names. For more Sydney History visit www.cityofsyd...

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Siobhan Getley's curator insight, April 7, 11:05 PM

This video is a short video on the history of how the streets in Sydney have been names. Dr. Shirley Fitzgerald and Dr. Lisa Murray discuss how the names of Sydney’s streets have originated and how they have changed over time. This video is engaging in the description of the history of Sydney.

 

It would be an extremely useful resource in providing students with factual information to begin further research. As this is in the form of an informal documentary it would be a good opportunity to assess students understanding through a form of comprehension. Many facts are discussed about who the streets have been named after and what has caused changes in the names of these streets throughout history.

 

Students could individually answer questions whilst watching the video as well as exploring more in-depth questions after the video assessing students understanding of how the origins of place names is influenced by more than other cultures and significant persons. In an article by Elizabeth Hoffman she states that “Local videos help students move from the immediately personal to the merely local, on their way to eventually seeing the relevance to general, larger social issues” (Hoffman, 2006, p. 170) this idea is extremely relevant to what should be explored with students using this video as a basis. Understanding the local history of their city but also how that history is impacted by events and cultures on a global scale.

 

References:

Hoffman, E. (2006). The importance of place: Using local focus videos to spark the sociologal imagination. Teaching sociology , 34 (2), 164-172.

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Children on the goldfields

Children on the goldfields | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
As much as there may have been some opportunities for fun and fossicking, children would have suffered through the same basic living conditions and harsh weather on the goldfields.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

What was life like for children on the goldfields?

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Diary of Sarah Davenport | Ergo

Diary of Sarah Davenport | Ergo | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
Primary sources written by women from the goldfields are few and far between. Diaries such as this provide a valuable insight into a word we rarely see.   Sarah Davenport, diary.
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National Museum of Australia - Australian history

National Museum of Australia - Australian history | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
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Chinatowns across Australia - australia.gov.au

Chinatowns across Australia - australia.gov.au | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
Catherine Smyth's insight:

The gold rushes of the 1850s saw an influx of Chinese migrants to Australian colonies.

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John Jung's curator insight, August 21, 2013 8:57 AM

There are many parallels in the origins of Chinatowns across Australia and in North America.  This site describes the Chinese diaspora , Australian style, and shows the similarities in how Chinese immigrants in both parts of the world lived and worked in anti-Chinese societies of the late 19th and much of the 20th century.

 

Rescooped by Catherine Smyth from British Colonisation of Australia
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education - Colonisation on ASO - Australia's audio and visual heritage online

education - Colonisation on ASO - Australia's audio and visual heritage online | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
Video clips related to Colonisation that have teachers notes on australianscreen.

Via Heather Munro
Catherine Smyth's insight:

This site has a range of short videos that provide useful and interesting snapshots of what life was like in the colonies. 

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Heather Munro's curator insight, April 22, 2013 12:44 AM

This website provides access to short videos collected by Australian Screen (2013), which is the source of Australia’s audio-visual heritage, and has a section dedicated to colonisation. The video extracts from The Colony (Australia Screen, 2013) would be particularly useful for students to use when looking at aspects of life associated with living on a newly established colony. These extracts are set in modern times, where three families are taking part in a living history experiment, where the participants have been placed into similar conditions as those arriving to Australia in 1788. While some may have reservations about using documented living history, it would be beneficial to students in small doses to make this part of history more realistic and imaginable for them. This resource demonstrates a key feature involved with history education, the role of ‘story’, which encourages the students to view this subject matter as a story, rather than historical facts that they must learn, as “stories have great potential to create interest in the past…They can spark initial curiosity” (Gilbert and Hoepper, p.200, 2011), and the students will meaningfully engage more easily.

 

An example of how a teacher could use this resource in the classroom would be to allow students to watch the video extracts and then begin a class discussion on what life would be like in early Australia on the colony, relating back to the video and suggesting what supplies the settlers had access to and where these materials came from. The teacher can easily build activities relating to the information discussed and use them as a cross-curriculum tool, such as using the rations that settlers were provided with as stimulus for mathematics. This activity could involve looking at how much money the British Government would need to supply the colonies with to fund these families, and also proceeding on to hypothetical bartering between students. Literacy links could also be made, where the student is taking on a persona who lived on the colonies and write a diary entry based on that fictitious person’s average day, which the teacher could use as an assessment tool to see if students understand different aspects of life that was present following the colonisation of Australia.

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Indigenous Australia Timeline - 1901 to 1969 - Australian Museum

Indigenous Australia Timeline - 1901 to 1969 - Australian Museum | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
A timeline of events relating to Indigenous Australians from the time of Federation in 1901 until 1969.
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Rescooped by Catherine Smyth from Symbols and cultural identity
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Civic history - City of Sydney

Civic history - City of Sydney | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
A history of Sydney City Council, which dates back to the 1840s.

Via Eric Jewson
Catherine Smyth's insight:

What life was like... Primary sources and the history of Sydney.

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Eric Jewson's curator insight, April 14, 2013 7:07 AM

The city of Sydney has a vast history as Australia's oldest city. This site has lots of useful data on it to be able to form a timeline of the development of the city and its people.

 

Particularly useful for stage 2 and investigating cultural identity in community are the sections on the symbols of the city and people and places. Symbols of the city delves into the history of Sydney and how it developed its coat of arms, flag and flower.

 

One way you could use this site in a classroom would be to compare Sydney with other city histories to see how cities can evolve in different ways. Sydney was never truly designed to be a city but rather started small and kept adding more suburbs. This is seen today in the lack of grid structure in its streets, which more often follow the lay of the land and sometimes have been built over old indigenous tracks. Relations to Aboriginal people in the area have changed vastly over time, there is a relevant list of significant days in history here: http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/learn/history/aboriginal-history/significant-dates.

As a task for the classroom students in groups could investigate the meaning behind one aspect of the symbols of Sydney (coat of arms, flower, gemstone, flag) and explain to the rest of the class the importance of the symbol and why it holds meaning. As a part of this lesson an excursion could be planned to Sydney town hall (http://www.sydneytownhall.com.au/schools-symbolism-and-identity.asp) as well as the museum of Sydney (http://www.hht.net.au/museums/mos).

 

 

 

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Visualising China 1850-1950: an interactive resource exploring historical photos of China

Visualising China 1850-1950: an interactive resource exploring historical photos of China | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it

Visualising China is a JISC-funded project to allow users to explore and enhance more than 8000 digitised images of photographs of China taken between 1850 and 1950. It allows access to many previously unseen albums, envelopes and private collections and also major collections such as Historical Photographs of China, the Sir Robert Hart Collection and Joseph Needham's Photographs of Wartime China. These have many sub-collections and albums. We hope you will contribute by using your knowledge to comment on or annotate these images.


Via Maree Whiteley
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Looking for a way to embed a global perspective? Visualising China 1850-1950: an interactive resource exploring historical photos of China

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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, March 17, 2013 5:44 AM

Bringing Chinese History to life...

Maree Whiteley's curator insight, March 17, 2013 5:45 AM

Bringing Chinese History to life...

Catherine Smyth's curator insight, April 4, 2013 6:33 PM

The images from this collection could be used to embed a global perspective in a history topic.

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Chinese contributions in Australian history | Asia Education Foundation

Chinese contributions in Australian history | Asia Education Foundation | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
A series of learning sequences for students of years 5, 6 and 9 to engage with China through History and English.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

This online teaching resource for Stage 3 poses three questions that guide inquiry:

What were the significant events and who were the significant people that shaped Australian colonies?Why did the Chinese migrate and what contribution did they make?What were the experiences of the Chinese in Australia prior to the 1900s?
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Rescooped by Catherine Smyth from History teaching in the primary classroom
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The Australian Curriculum v3.0 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures

The Australian Curriculum v3.0 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are strong, rich and diverse. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Identity is central to this priority and is intrinsically linked to living, learning Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, deep knowledge traditions and holistic world view.

A conceptual framework based on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ unique sense of Identity has been developed as a structural tool for the embedding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures within the Australian curriculum. This sense of Identity is approached through the interconnected aspects of Country/Place, People and Culture. Embracing these elements enhances all areas of the curriculum.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander priority provides opportunities for all learners to deepen their knowledge of Australia by engaging with the world’s oldest continuous living cultures. This knowledge and understanding will enrich their ability to participate positively in the ongoing development of Australia.


Via Maree Whiteley, Catherine Smyth
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Primary teachers need to embed Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives in their teaching. Use the ideas in this website to frame planning.

more...
Clare O'Connor's curator insight, April 1, 2013 11:32 PM

This is going to be a Cross-curricular priority, so I thought it useful to add for our RMLP teachers and in-house education providers.

Greta Brewin's curator insight, October 31, 2013 12:17 AM

I thought it would be a really helpful resource to store a direct link to the cross-curriculum priorities page on the ACARA website. This links to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders histories and cultures cross-curricular priority information page. As teachers you need to link you lesson and unit plans to the Australian Curriculum, and anything that falls under this priority can be justified as a viable learning outcome, because of the priority. Which I think is great, students and teachers need to learn about our indigenous history. 

Rescooped by Catherine Smyth from Events that have shaped Australia's identity
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Crossing the Blue Mountains | State Library of New South Wales

Crossing the Blue Mountains | State Library of New South Wales | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it

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Amy Baker's curator insight, March 29, 8:46 PM

The State Library of NSW houses collections of documents. This website provides access to resources which tell the story of explorers' attempts to cross the Blue Mountains including journals, watercolour drawings and maps.

 

This site describes modes of transport in the 1800s including the use of pack horses and gives students an idea of how tedious travel was. Students could compare the journey in the 1800s and the journey today with the availability of modern transport. Students could study the development of infrastructure, in particular the construction of a railway.

 

The site also contains images of William Lawson and William Charles Wenthworth’s journals. Journals could be used as a literacy tool and students could read and compare other historic journals or write their own journals based on historical events.

 

The maps could introduce the students to cartography and lead into a unit which examines other areas and types of maps. Students could undertake activities such as making maps which are relevant to their lives, such as for the local area.

 

Exploration of the Blue Mountains will be of particular interest to Sydney students because it is within close proximity to where they live but many students will not have been there. This topic could involve an excursion to the Blue Mountains for students to see the terrain and gain an understanding of the hardship of colonial exploration.

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~ GOLD ~

~ GOLD ~ | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
Catherine Smyth's insight:

The discovery of gold was a significant event in colonial Australia- but why?

The organisation of this website around key ideas provides a snapshot of what life was like on the gold fields.

The website covers a range of perspectives (women, Chinese and indigenous) and includes a range of primary and secondary sources.

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What was early Sydney like?

What was early Sydney like? | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
Conrad Martens, whose watercolours are a valuable record of colonial Sydney, is reputed to be its first successful artist. (Video excerpt 2.32 minutesalso has educational notes. This clip chosen to be PG)
Catherine Smyth's insight:

 Paintings are a valuable source of information about a place in the past and can be used to develop historical understanding of concepts such as change and continuity or significance. Use this short clip of Conrad Martens' paintings to show what Sydney was like in the 1830s-1870s.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, March 9, 5:20 PM

What did Sydney look like in the 1800s? Use this short clip of paintings by Conrad Martens to show significant buildings and land forms of the early colony. Teaching notes accompany the clip.

Catherine Smyth's curator insight, March 9, 5:25 PM

Use primary sources, such as paintings that were done at the time, to show what places were like in the past. In this 2 minute clip, the paintings by the artist Conrad Martens, provide a historical record of the early Sydney colony from 1835-1870.

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Golden Victoria- the discovery of gold

Golden Victoria- the discovery of gold | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
The discovery of gold in Victoria created years of wealth for the young colony. Here was a metal that could liberate servants from their masters and sometimes set those masters off to dig for gold themselves.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

The discovery of gold is a significant event in Australia's history. Here are some useful teaching resources around the topic of life on the goldfields and the impact on society.

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Women on the goldfields | Ergo

Women on the goldfields | Ergo | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
More than 160,000 women were among the 600,000 who arrived in Victoria between 1851 and 1860.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

A woman's voice is heard loud and clear in this range of primary sources from the Australian gold fields.

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History teaching in the primary classroom

History teaching in the primary classroom | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
Teaching resources for Australian curriculum: history
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National Museum of Australia - Ned Kelly's Jerilderie Letter

National Museum of Australia - Ned Kelly's Jerilderie Letter | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
Year 5
English, Australian history
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drama-settlers-under-sail.pdf

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A Convict Story: interactive teaching resource - Sydney Living Museums - Historic Houses Trust of NSW

A Convict Story: interactive teaching resource - Sydney Living Museums - Historic Houses Trust of NSW | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
Sydney Living Museums, the public identity of the Historic Houses Trust of NSW, brings 12 major heritage sites alive through exhibitions, publications, events, and education.

Via Molly Cresswell
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Molly Cresswell's comment, April 17, 2013 7:47 PM
“A Convict Story” is a website designed to explore the people and places from when the British first arrived in Australia and when the convicts were transported from the United Kingdom. It is an interactive website that allows the user to take on the role of a convict, examine artefacts, learn about how the British came to Australia and imagine the possibility of having convict ancestry. The site is centred around providing a historical experience by supplying photos, case studies, paintings and other artefacts to help imagine the environment.
This interactive website is designed for student centred learning, possibly as an additional assessment or homework task, and could be suitable for Stage Two and Three. There are many sections and areas to explore, each providing a different pathway and focusing on a different area of British settlement. There are teachers notes provided on the website should the teacher wish to lead a class in discussion, and areas which would be suitable for group work or debate.
A Constructivist approach would be very successful when utilising this website. When students explore this website independently they will involve themselves in areas which interest them and start to glean pockets of information. By exploring the website on their own they create their own experiences, and as they read and experience more, they will begin to piece their information together, constructing their understanding. In this way, students will be more likely to remember these experiences because they have a personal attachment and control over what they learnt.
By providing steps or stages of information, this website provides the scaffolding for knowledge, much the same as Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) (1978). The website gives initial information, coupled with artefacts and evidence, and then asks open ended thought-provoking questions which will help students to lead their own investigations. As a result this website offers both in-class teaching opportunities as well as chances for student exploration at home.


Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
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Map of Australia and New Zealand since 1788

Map of Australia and New Zealand since 1788 | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
History map of Australia and New Zealand 1788-1911, illustrating the Commonwealth of Australia (1901), routes of Stuart, 1858 - 1862, routes of Giles and Forrest, 1874 - 1876, Overland telegraph line (1872), Railways, and New Zealand...
Catherine Smyth's insight:

What is this a map of? Who created it? Why was it created?

Use this primary source to stimulate discussion about British colonisation. Before showing this map, display an Aboriginal Languages map. Students can compare the two maps with a more recent map of Australia. To develop historical understanding, pose questions, analyse primary sources and then construct an historical narrative.

 

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Victorian Home Life for Teachers - Geffrye UK

Victorian Home Life for Teachers - Geffrye UK | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it
Resource for teachers about Victorian home life
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Although this is a UK museum and website, there are a range of resources teachers can adapt or use to help create a context for their students. What was life like in the past? Pose questions to guide historical inquiry and help students develop historical understanding of continuity and change, cause and consequence and evidence. Scaffold learning to ensure that students produce an explanation.

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A History of Aboriginal Sydney

A History of Aboriginal Sydney | Primary history- The Australian Colonies | Scoop.it

This website is worth exploring! The website has a strong research base and each section has been developed in consultation with the local Aboriginal community. Teachers wanting information about a particular area in Sydney can find information relating to 'Place'.  All events related to that area are described by a century and then decade. The website contains a timeline, various topics and a gallery.

 


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