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International Migration

Almost everywhere on the world, international migration is a hot topic. Most of the time the debate about migration is fierce and charged with prejudices and...

Via Natalie K Jensen
Catherine Smyth's insight:

The topic, "Australia as a nation" in the new Australian curriculum:history provides the opportunity for Year 5/6 students to learn about the significance of migration in Australia. This video explores the big ideas about migration.

Although some of the video is more relevant for secondary students, parts of it could be used in the primary classroom. It provides good background information about the topic and includes graphs and statistics through which primary teachers can address numeracy outcomes.

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Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, September 10, 2014 10:02 AM

This video is primarily talking on the widely known topic of migration. 3 percent of the worlds population is living away from there place of birth. The push of migration from places include poverty, war, and environmental disasters. The migration pull in some places are because of  economic opportunity, and political freedom. Migration is increasing, and is thought of as a bad thing.(s.s.)

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 2014 8:59 PM

This video is great for going over the many different aspects that go along with migration. It talks about what migration is and the reasons why people migrate known as push and pull factors. It talks about the different types of migration such as asylum seakers and illegal immigration. It mentions the disadvantages and advantages of migration.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:27 PM

A great YouTube video- discussing the controversy of international migration among other things that fall into place of the disapproval of international migration. -UNIT 2 

Primary history- Australia as a Nation
Teaching resources, ideas and links for the Australian Curriculum :history topic "Australia as a Nation". In this topic, Stage 3 students identify change and continuity and describe the causes and effects of change on Australian society; describe and explain the struggles for rights and freedoms in Australia, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples; and apply a variety of skills of historical inquiry and communication
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NSW syllabus ACH Topic Stage 3 : Australia as a Nation

Throughout 2011 and 2012, the Board of Studies NSW developed new K–10 syllabuses for English, Mathematics, Science (incorporating Science and Technology K–6) and History that incorporate agreed Australian Curriculum content.
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Australia Day | State Library of New South Wales

Australia Day | State Library of New South Wales | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
The official founding ceremony of the new colony at Port Jackson has become

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Claire Reinthal's curator insight, April 20, 6:21 AM

 

 

Description of what is on this site:

 

This fascinating resource includes pictures and documents originating from the days of the First Fleet. These give students an idea of the British community who were settling in Sydney as well as the environment they inhabited. By extension, this also gives the students insight into the great changes in community and environment which have occurred since then.

 

 

A teaching idea and idea for an assessment task:

 

After some instruction on the forms of newspaper writing, children can be encouraged to consider all the aspects of Australia Day as they write their own articles, newspaper style, for their summative assessment task. The resource at this link  http://www.enchantedlearning.com/newspaper/ could help students understand about newspaper writing styles. Perhaps these can be published in the school newsletter. Students should be encouraged to report on the changes in community and family life and the effects of these on individuals, groups and the environment from 'the first Australia Day', January 26, 1788, until now. 

 

 

A literacy or numeracy strategy:

 

The above activity would cover outcome EN2-2A from the English Syllabus, 'plans, composes and reviews' 'texts that are more demanding'.

 

 

References:

 

Enchanted Learning (2015) Make a Classroom Newspaper. Retrieved April 20, 2015, from http://www.enchantedlearning.com/newspaper/

 

State Library of NSW (2015). The First Australia Day. Retrieved April 6, 2015, from http://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/discover_collections/history_nation/terra_australis/education/australia_day/index.html

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Historic images 1900-1950 Sydney Harbour

Historic images 1900-1950 Sydney Harbour | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
The Google Cultural Institute brings together millions of artifacts from multiple partners, with the stories that bring them to life, in a virtual museum.
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What's Australia Day all about?

What's Australia Day all about? | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
Explore, play and learn with ABC Splash. Over 2500 videos, games and other resources. All mapped to the Australian curriculum.
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This clip investigates Australia Day from different perspectives.


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Inquiry questions for topic of migration

The feature provides an introduction to the study of immigration to the United States focusing only on the immigrant groups that arrived in greatest numbers during the 19th and early 20th centuries.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Some useful American based resources that can be adapted for learning about the impact of migration on Australia's national identity.

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Harvest of Endurance

Harvest of Endurance | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
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Harvest of Endurance is a 50-metre long scroll depicting 2 centuries of Chinese contact with Australia. The opportunities for building new knowledge about the past through visual literacy are boundless.

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Broome in 1940s- the impact of migration

Broome in 1940s- the impact of migration | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
The Indian camel trader and the Japanese pearl diver become part of the film’s projection of the exotic within the expansive space of the Australian outback. (Video excerpt 2.55 minutesalso has educational notes. This clip chosen to be G)
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Old footage shows the impact of migration on the small town of Broome in the 1940s. The film also reveals something of the attitudes of the time.

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Our shared history | Share Our Pride

Our shared history | Share Our Pride | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
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Australia's Shared History is presented on a interactive timeline. Significant dates, events, places and people are presented.

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World Vision: 'Get Connected' migration lesson plan

World Vision: 'Get Connected' migration lesson plan | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it

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Sonja Shuttleworth's curator insight, April 13, 2014 5:21 AM

World Vision Australia has a range of school resources linked to its magazine 'Get Connected'. The resources related to migration and asylum seekers are notable for their global perspective.

 

The migration lesson plan is a series of six lessons designed to accompany the issue of 'Get Connected' focusing on migration. The lesson plan covers the following aspects of migration:

- Australia’s immigration story

- Push and pull factors

- Types of migration

- Asylum seekers and refugees

- The migrant experience

- The role of government and NGOs.

 

The magazine itself  includes a number of personal narratives in the form of written case studies, and the lesson plan links to digital migration stories, part of acmi’s digital storytelling project: http://generator.acmi.net.au/education-themes

 

MODIFICATION

The migration lesson plan does not specify a target stage or age group, and seem to be geared towards upper primary and lower secondary students.

 

This means that some of the content and activities would need to be modified for Stage 2 students. This could be done by:

- limiting the amount of independent research that students are expected to complete for activities

- supplying the information instead, either as printouts or links to websites.

 

Lesson 6, ‘the role of government and NGOs’, may be more suitable for Stage 3 students, who look at ‘structures, roles, responsibilities and decision-making processes of State and federal governments’ (SSS3.8)

 

However, many of the activities in the lesson plan are already suitable for Stage 2 students. These include:

- creating a class graph or chart showing the regions that families come from

- making a poster of push-pull factors

- examining and interpreting maps.

 

RESOURCES

Although the lesson plan is free to download, the magazine itself is not available to download. It can be ordered from World Vision for $9.90 per copy.

http://www.worldvision.com.au/Libraries/School_Resources/Get_Connected_Order_Form_2012.pdf

 

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS 

Asylum seekers fact sheet

http://www.worldvision.com.au/Libraries/School_Resources/Asylum_seekers.pdf

 

The refugee journey

http://www.worldvision.com.au/Libraries/School_Resources/The_refugee_journey.pdf

 

LINKS TO OTHER SYLLABUS OUTCOMES

Stage 2 teachers could consider using texts with personal narratives to link this global perspective on migration to the English syllabus. Suggested texts include:

 

The Little Refugee, by Anh Do and Suzanne Do, illustrated by Bruce Whatley

- Anh Do's story about his family's escape from war-torn Vietnam and his childhood in Australia, told especially for children

http://www.allenandunwin.com/default.aspx?page=94&book=9781742378329

http://www.allenandunwin.com/_uploads/BookPdf/TeachersNotes/9781742378329.pdf

 

Harmony and understanding

http://www.blake.com.au/Harmony-and-Understanding-s/773.htm

A nonfiction series that fosters understanding, inclusion, tolerance and respect for the multicultural experience. Created in partnership with the Australian Multicultural Foundation

 

World Vision Australia and the Primary English Teaching Association Australia have also developed a unit of work called ‘Global people’

http://www.globalwords.edu.au/units/Refugees_UPY6_html/documents/GlobalWords_Refugees_UPY6print.pdf

 

The ‘Global people’ unit of work is based on the following texts:

‘Ziba Came on a Boat’, by Liz Lofthouse, illustrated by Robert Ingpen

‘Mahtab’s Story, by Libby Gleeson

‘Parvana’, by Deborah Ellis

‘Boy Overboard’, by Morris Gleitzman

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Exploring Democracy · Home · Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House

Exploring Democracy · Home · Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
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1901 Australian Snapshot

1901 Australian Snapshot | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
Catherine Smyth's insight:

What was life like in 1901? The Australian Bureau of Statistics data are excellent primary sources to use in the classroom. Use a graphic organiser (e.g. Venn diagram, T Chart, Retrieval Chart) to organise and record information. Compare what life was like in 1901 to current times and begin to analyse WHY and WHAT has changed over the century.

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Differing perspectives: Australia Day / Invasion Day

Differing perspectives: Australia Day / Invasion Day | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
Most Australians celebrate Australia Day as the day Australia was founded.

In contrast, Aboriginal people mourn their history and call it ‘Invasion Day’.
Catherine Smyth's insight:
Australia Day (January 26) is a significant event in the nation's calendar but not everyone agrees on what the day represents. For some Australians, Australia Day is about national identity or national values. For others, Australia Day represents something different. This website offers an Aboriginal perspective on Australia Day. I am interested in how teachers can deal with an issue or a topic that may be controversial in the community. The researchers, Barton & Levstik, argue that conflict is fundamental to democracy and that teachers should be honest with their students about both the conflict and consensus surrounding an event or an issue. Rather than closing down discussion or differences of opinion, they suggest that teachers should prepare their students for a reasoned discussion about an issue. Teachers should carefully plan and scaffold the discussion about a contentious issue. The following scaffold uses some of ideas and research findings of Barton and Levstk (2005) in Doing History. Using these ideas, teachers can plan a discussion about Australia Day or any other current event: 1. Pose an inquiry question e.g. "What is Australia Day?", "How has Australia Day changed?". As a class, come up with additional questions. 2. Prepare primary and secondary sources related to the topic (e.g. Babakiueria DVD, newspaper articles, cartoons, songs, photographs, diary entries, historical narratives etc;) 3. Do some background research. Present facts and knowledge (e.g. dates, places, people). Use a graphic organiser to organise information. For example, use a T Chart, Venn Diagram, Retrieval Chart. (Check out the free downloadable templates on Global Education http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/1840.html). 5. Provide opportuntities for small group background work around different aspects of the topic. Gather information about different perspectives about the topic. 6. Provide time for students to form a tentative position. Students can write a positional statement using evidence they have found. 7. Allow time to discuss and think.
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Thanh Thuong Nguyen's curator insight, April 12, 2014 11:26 PM

Through the meaning implied in Aboriginal celebration of Survival Day, the page introduces Aboriginal perspective about the contemporary issue existing in Australia. When Australian people are celebrating Australian Day, many Aboriginal people found there is little to celebrate with the same meaning; rather, they celebrate Survival Day that implies their commemoration of a deep loss_ the loss of their rights to their land, loss of family, loss of the right to practice their culture. The source also includes Aboriginal participation by representing difference voices of Aboriginal people about the issue. The site also emphasises the account of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal history by introducing the emerging thinking in some Australians about the concept of “Arrival Day” celebration in which both Indigenous and Australian history are praised and promoted.


The source provides teachers with a different perspective from which they can design teaching activities that promote students developing different viewpoints. This is a useful resource for teachers not only in term of obtaining information to teach the concept and the origin of Australia Day, but also in term of teaching the story implied in the event viewed from an Aboriginal point of view. By applying the idea of this resource into teaching, teachers would be able to raise students’ awareness of the diversity that has been existed since the foundation of the country in which they are living, and advise them the existing discrimination that they should avoid. When carry on any teaching activities that requires students to collect data about the event from different perspective, it is crucial for teachers to provide enough guidance to students in order to avoid encountering sensitivity and offensiveness.

Bianca Levins's curator insight, March 29, 7:40 AM

Through poetry, song and stories, this page offers Aboriginal perspectives on Australia day. After several lessons spent discussing what Australia Day means to different people, this resource asks students to think deeper about the day and its significance for Aboriginal people.

 

Many Aboriginal people call January 26 Invasion Day or Survival Day. Why is that? To clarify their thoughts, students could complete a fishbone diagram (Global Education, 2014). Global Education suggest labeling the scales with “how, why, when, where and what” (2014). For example, ‘HOW does this person feel? WHY do they feel this way? WHAT does this make me feel?’

 

Students could expand their individual ideas in an independent assessment task, looking at the Creative Spirits site. Students could choose to present their findings in a variety of ways, for example as a poem about how a particular story made them feel to be read at assembly (inspired by a project at Coffs Harbour Public School), a report for the class blog, or an educational poster to display in the school to raise awareness.  

 

REFERENCES:

Global Education. (2014). Retrieved 31 March, 2015 from http://globaleducation.edu.au/verve/_resources/fishbone.pdf

 

Coffs Harbour Public School (2015). Retrieved 31 March, 2015 from http://coffsharbourpublicschool.edublogs.org/2014/03/20/august-6th-1945-nagasaki-and-hiroshima-bombings-by-6h/#more-5160

 

Claire Reinthal's curator insight, April 20, 6:00 AM

 

 

Description of what is on this site:

 

This resource explains the HSIE outcome at CCS2.2 in relation to what has become known as Australia Day but is mourned as Invasion Day by many Aboriginal people.

 

This is done by looking at Australia Day over time and from the perspective of different Aboriginal people and the impacts the arrival of the British had on their family members/ancestors and on them personally.

 

This is a good follow-on resource from First Australians, Episode 1, since it gives the perspectives of people of today on the events which happened in 1788 and their impacts now. 

 

 

A teaching idea and link to relevant pedagogical research:

 

Working in groups, students could be asked to look at the changes in the community and family life and impacts of these due to the arrival of the British, January 26, 1788 and to create a timeline of events which caused these changes or resulted from them, including quotes from different Aboriginal people.

 

The students could be told that this task would be assessed and students asked to help devise a rubric for assessing this outcome since "...learning is best achieved when students are actively involved in the teaching and learning process." (Bobis, Mulligan, & Lowrie, 2013, p. 291). This lessons learning would be assessed formatively.

  

 

A literacy strategy/link to English KLA:

 

Again, this task would also be fulfilling outcomes in the NSW English Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum such as:

EN2-6B 'distinguishes between different forms of English' and 'identifies organisational patterns and features' and 'listen to and contribute to conversations and discussions to share information and ideas'.

 

 

References:

 

Bobis, J.,Mulligan, J., & Lowrie, T. (2013). Mathematics for Children: Challenging children to think mathematically. Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia.

 

Creative Spirits, Jens Korff (2014). Australia Day – Invasion Day. Retrieved April 20, 2015, from http://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/history/australia-day-invasion-day#toc0

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The impact of migration

The impact of migration | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
The settlement at Port Phillip was less than twenty years old in 1851. With around 95,000 people, the colony was already considered a success and relied mainly on wool and wheat exports for its income.
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Primary sources for teaching about the impact of migration on Australia.

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Chinese Migration and the Gold Rush

Chinese Migration and the Gold Rush | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
The reasons people migrated to Australia from Europe and Asia, and the experiences and contributions of a particular migrant group within a colony. (ACHHK096)
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Louder than One Voice – 50 years of the Indigenous vote and its importance

Louder than One Voice – 50 years of the Indigenous vote and its importance | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it

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Justine Yip's curator insight, March 28, 5:34 AM

This website reflects on human rights in Australia and the long struggle of Australia's indigenous peoples. It contains images of artwork commissioned by the Indigenous Electoral Participation Program (IEPP) used to encourage Indigenous people to enrol to vote for the 50th anniversary of the indigenous vote (2012). A link is also provided to the Australian Electoral Commission's Louder Than One Voice video. 

 

Commemorating 50 years since indigenous Australians were given the right to vote at federal elections (1962 - 2012), Louder Than One Voice documents through interviews the struggle of Australia's indigenous peoples to be recognised by the government. Targeted at Indigenous Australians, it stresses the importance of having indigenous voices heard through the vote and how voting will make changes for future generations and benefit Australia as a nation. 

 

 

View 'Louder Than One Voice' on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4Xu207eC70&nbsp

 

These sources are appropriate and "sensitive and adequate" in their treatment of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders and their relation and role in the electoral process and governmental issues (Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority, 2007, p. 1.). ATSI perspectives are clearly evident, a cross-curriculum priority of the Australian National Curriculum (ACARA, 2015), which enables students to investigate electoral issues from an indigenous viewpoint and draws attention to governmental issues ATSI peoples still face (Kleeman, 2012, pp. 24-28).

 

These perspectives allow students to "learn about, acknowledge and value the cultures of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders" (NCB, 2009, p.15 in Stevens and McDonald, 201, p. 387). By embedding indigenous perspectives, the sources are also striving towards reconciliation and "recognising, acknowledging and redressing existing racism...for the benefit of all Australians" (Stevens & McDonald, 2011, pp. 387-388).

 

 

A literacy activity  could include:

- Students write a hypothetical letter from the viewpoint of an Australian Indigenous person to their local government representative, highlighting issues they face such as poverty and a lack of education. This could show how citizen participation can contribute to the wider community and the importance of citizens having their voices heard at a governmental level.

 

 

 

References:

 

Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority, (2015), Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures, Retrieved 29 March 2015 from  

http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/CrossCurriculumPriorities/Aboriginal-and-Torres-Strait-Islander-histories-and-cultures

 

Australian Electoral Commission, (2012), Louder than One Voice, Retrieved 28 March 2015 from  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4Xu207eC70&nbsp

 

Kleeman, G (2012). Towards a more inclusive curriculum: The perspectives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander peoples in geography curriculum documents. Geographical Education, 25(1), pp. 24-28.

 

Stevens, V & McDonald, H, (2011), Incorporating Aboriginal perspectives and Torres Strait Islander perspectives in SOSE. In Gilbert, R & Hoepper, B (Eds) Teaching Society and Environment (pp. 324-347), Melbourne: CENGAGE Learning

 
Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority, (2007), Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives: Selecting and evaluating resources. Retrieved 28 March 2015 from https://www.qcaa.qld.edu.au/downloads/approach/indigenous_g008_0712.pdf

 

Right Now Inc. (2012), Louder than One Voice – 50 years for Indigenous vote, Retrieved 28 March 2015 from http://rightnow.org.au/artwork/louder-than-one-voice-50-years-for-indigenous-vote/

 

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Project-based learning: essential questions and authentic tasks

Project-based learning: essential questions and authentic tasks | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
Essential questions and authentic tasks work together in a project-based learning environment
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Some nice ideas for a problem-based approach to learning about Migration. Drive the inquiry with an effective and essential question and design authentic tasks to deepen understanding.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, March 17, 8:57 PM

Drive historical inquiry with effective questions and design authentic assessment tasks when teaching history in the primary school.


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Interesting Australians

Interesting Australians | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
Images from the State Library of NSW's collections of interesting figures in Australia's history.
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The Immigrant Experience: Down the Rabbit Hole - Lesson Plan | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress

In this lesson, students will use the first-hand accounts of immigrants, class discussions of students' experiences, and other primary source documents and images from the collections of the Library of Congress to uncover the common themes of the immigrant experience.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Need ideas for teaching about migration? These resources from the Library of Congress in the US can be adapted to suit an Australian context.


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Australia as a Nation: Vietnam and migration

Australia as a Nation: Vietnam and migration | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
This website has been designed for Primary School teachers. It  provides a whole unit of work aimed at stage 3 students looking at Vietnam and the migration to Australia. 
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A Stage 3 unit of work developed by final year B.Ed Primary students to support teaching and learning for the Australian history topic: Australia as a Nation

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Federation | AC History Units

Federation | AC History Units | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
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Developed by the History Teachers' Association of Australia, this Year 6 Unit of Work titled "Federation" uses a historical inquiry approach. Activities are framed around a Multiple Intelligences/Bloom's Taxonomy grid.

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Webquest: What contributions have immigrants made to the Australian way of life?

Webquest: What contributions have immigrants made to the Australian way of life? | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it

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Sonja Shuttleworth's curator insight, April 13, 2014 4:09 AM

 This is an excellent webquest that aligns closely with ideas of heritage, identity and migration explored by Stage 2 HSIE students in NSW. The objective of this webquest is to ‘explore the journey undertaken by migrant families and come to understand their contributions to Australia.’ (http://jesselda-webquest.wikispaces.com/Introduction)

 

WEBQUESTS

 

A webquest often takes the form of a mystery or problem for students to solve online. It generally features a task for students to complete using pre-provided links to information.

 

Lamb (2004, p. 38) has described a webquest as ‘a particular type of inquiry-based activity that asks students to use Web-based resources and tools to transform what they are learning into meaningful understandings and real-world projects.’

 

Webquests also have the following benefits:

- most or all of the information is found on pre-selected websites

- learners do not have to spend substantial time using search tools

- web-based information is used to address high-level questions.

(Lamb, 2004, p. 38)

 

OVERVIEW

 

The webquest sets five tasks for completion under the following headings:

- The history of immigration in Australia

- Why did/do people migrate to Australia?

- What are the contributions/impacts of immigration in Australia?

- Preparation for the interview [with someone who has migrated to Australia from another country]

- The interview

 

In completing these tasks, students hear narratives told by migrants to Australia, and identify occupations, skills and culinary traditions migrants have brought with them.

 

Students carry out the following exercises in their journey through the webquest:

- define terms

- create a timeline, survey, graph and mindmap

- collaborate with classmates

- conduct an interview.

 

MODIFICATION

This webquest has been developed for Victorian primary school students in year 4, and makes excellent use of local resources from  Museum Victoria. The content is relevant to Stage 2 (year 3 and 4) students in NSW, however some of the activities may need to be modified for younger students – for instance, tasks 4 and 5 might be changed to ask students to formulate interview questions, rather than conduct the interview itself. 

 

ASSESSMENT

The five tasks in the webquest are designed to stand as assessment tasks, and an evaluation rubric is provided: http://jesselda-webquest.wikispaces.com/Evaluation

 

RESOURCES

The webquest author (unfortunately uncredited) has created a comprehensive resources and links page

http://jesselda-webquest.wikispaces.com/Credits

 

The Teacher’s Page (http://jesselda-webquest.wikispaces.com/Teachers+Page) features teacher resources and outlines links to the Victorian curriculum.

 

REFERENCES

Lamb, A. (2004). WebQuests. School Library Media Activities Monthly 21 (2), p. 38

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Federation

Federation | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
As you just saw there a couple of states had elections on the weekend. You probably know that Aussie states have their own laws and their own leaders but have you ever wondered why that is? It all goes back to a time when the states were separate colonies. I thought it was a good chance to go back in time and take a look at how Australia came to be Australia. And a warning for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers; this story contains images of people who've died.

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Jarred Baker's curator insight, April 10, 2014 8:56 PM

This resource is a segment from the ABC’s ‘Behind The News’ program (air date: 18/3/2014, length 4.54) that explores the origins of Federation in Australia. It explores why Australian people wanted a united nation, how that came to be with a focus on key personalities such as Henry Parkes and Alfred Deakin, and what implications it had in the history of the development of Australian democracy. It uses authentic images from the period as well as re-enacting particular scenes using children in period costume, which can help make the content relevant to students. It also comes attached with a raft of related web resources.

 

It might be useful to have students, like the kids in the video, role play the negotiations leading up to Federation and drafting of the constitution. Students can be placed in groups that represent each state and then given particular points that their state wanted, or general concerns that parties had about the constitution, to argue in a mock debate.

 

A question that students can focus on when watching this video is what has changed or remained similar after Federation. These ideas can then be collated together as class by the teacher on the white board or smart board. It might be interesting to discuss the role of states in Australia and even debate whether we should still have states or not. This can then link in nicely with looking at the 1967 referendum and the idea of a need for federal, rather than state, legislation concerning Aboriginal people.

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Sudanese Stories | Sudanese Stories | NSW Migration Heritage Centre

Sudanese Stories | Sudanese Stories | NSW Migration Heritage Centre | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it

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Amy Baker's curator insight, April 12, 2014 4:49 AM

This website provides oral accounts by members of Blacktown’s Sudanese community as they share their experiences of moving from Sudan to Australia. It exemplifies diversity between people, within a community and a variety of experiences.

 

Grace Jook’s story of studying at the library will interest, and possibly amaze, students. Her and her friends’ determination to overcome their disrupted schooling and do well in their HSC demonstrates an appreciation of the value of education, which may be a value students recognise in their own families.

 

Photos, maps and descriptions of Sudan provide students with some understanding of the adjustment required of immigrants. An activity may be to compare life in Australia to life in Sudan.

 

Students could conduct research about migrantion. They could conduct an interview of a person who has migrated to Australia and document their experience. This could be part of a unit of study about the link between world events and the arrival and plight of migrant groups.

 

In order to incorporate literacy students could read and review a book about a migrant’s experience. They could read or perform part of this text to the class. Here is a reading of “The Little Refugee” by Anh Do and Suzanne Do: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fml6dIcfQFA

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Topic 1: Immigration | Asia Education Foundation

Topic 1: Immigration | Asia Education Foundation | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
Online professional learning module for primary teachers implementing the Asia priority in the Australian Curriculum in English and History for years 5-6.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

This new teaching resource aligns well to the Australian Curriculum topic "Australia as a nation".

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Using historical fiction to teach history

Using historical fiction to teach history | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it

Becoming Billy Dare encompasses an important and sometimes neglected era in Australian history. The decade preceding Federation was instrumental in establishing Australia's identity as a nation. Henry Lawson was in the prime of his working life, William Lane and other unionists were dreaming of a worker's utopia, and Australian popular culture was developing its own proud, distinctive flavour.


Via Maree Whiteley, Catherine Smyth
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Many primary teachers use a range of both fiction and non-fiction texts in their teaching. Use these 6  research-based guidelines (Barton & Levstik, 2005) for selecting historical fiction:

 

1. Does the book tell a good story? A book must be good literature and good history.

2. Is the story accurate and authentic in its historical detail? Children's fiction deserves the same attention to historical accuracy as nonfiction.

3. Is the language authentic to the times? Completely authentic language is rarely possible in children's historical fiction. Look for the flavour of the times.

4. Is the historical interpretation sound? Avoid romanticised historical fiction.

5. Whose voices are missing? Consider who the participants in an event might have been, and select literature to represent those perspectives.

6. Does the book provide insight and understanding into current issues as well as those in the past? Well-written narratives have relevance for the present.

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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, May 26, 2013 10:46 PM

The History Teacher's Association of Australia recommends both Becoming Billy Dare & Bridie's Fire for Year 6. To check out their resources go to:

http://achistoryunits.edu.au/year-6/unit-program/y6-overview-v2.html

Catherine Smyth's curator insight, October 8, 2013 2:49 AM

Many primary teachers use a range of both fiction and non-fiction texts in their teaching. Use these 6  research-based guidelines (Barton & Levstik, 2005) for selecting historical fiction:

 

1. Does the book tell a good story? A book must be good literature and good history.

2. Is the story accurate and authentic in its historical detail? Children's fiction deserves the same attention to historical accuracy as nonfiction.

3. Is the language authentic to the times? Completely authentic language is rarely possible in children's historical fiction. Look for the flavour of the times.

4. Is the historical interpretation sound? Avoid romanticised historical fiction.

5. Whose voices are missing? Consider who the participants in an event might have been, and select literature to represent those perspectives.

6. Does the book provide insight and understanding into current issues as well as those in the past? Well-written narratives have relevance for the present.

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Immigration Nation

Immigration Nation | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
Immigration Nation
Catherine Smyth's insight:

A powerful documentary that traces the history and impact of the White Australia policy on the nation and its citizens.

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