Primary history- Australia as a Nation
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Primary history- Australia as a Nation
Teaching resources, ideas and links for the Australian Curriculum :history topic "Australia as a Nation". In this topic, Stage 3 students identify change and continuity and describe the causes and effects of change on Australian society; describe and explain the struggles for rights and freedoms in Australia, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples; and apply a variety of skills of historical inquiry and communication
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Australian Accents

Australian Accents | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
Okay now we've all heard people from overseas try to do an Aussie accent. It can be pretty embarrassing to listen to. But is there just one accent or do Australians from different areas or walks of life speak in different ways? Here's Emma with more about one research project helping to answer that very question.
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Project-based learning: essential questions and authentic tasks

Project-based learning: essential questions and authentic tasks | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
Essential questions and authentic tasks work together in a project-based learning environment
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Some nice ideas for a problem-based approach to learning about Migration. Drive the inquiry with an effective and essential question and design authentic tasks to deepen understanding.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, March 17, 2015 8:57 PM

Drive historical inquiry with effective questions and design authentic assessment tasks when teaching history in the primary school.


Ness Crouch's curator insight, August 3, 2015 9:03 PM

Some nice ideas for a problem-based approach to learning about Migration. Drive the inquiry with an effective and essential question and design authentic tasks to deepen understanding.

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The Immigrant Experience: Down the Rabbit Hole - Lesson Plan | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress

In this lesson, students will use the first-hand accounts of immigrants, class discussions of students' experiences, and other primary source documents and images from the collections of the Library of Congress to uncover the common themes of the immigrant experience.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Need ideas for teaching about migration? These resources from the Library of Congress in the US can be adapted to suit an Australian context.


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Broome in 1940s- the impact of migration

Broome in 1940s- the impact of migration | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
The Indian camel trader and the Japanese pearl diver become part of the film’s projection of the exotic within the expansive space of the Australian outback. (Video excerpt 2.55 minutesalso has educational notes. This clip chosen to be G)
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Old footage shows the impact of migration on the small town of Broome in the 1940s. The film also reveals something of the attitudes of the time.

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Webquest: What contributions have immigrants made to the Australian way of life?

Webquest: What contributions have immigrants made to the Australian way of life? | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it

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Sonja Shuttleworth's curator insight, April 13, 2014 4:09 AM

 This is an excellent webquest that aligns closely with ideas of heritage, identity and migration explored by Stage 2 HSIE students in NSW. The objective of this webquest is to ‘explore the journey undertaken by migrant families and come to understand their contributions to Australia.’ (http://jesselda-webquest.wikispaces.com/Introduction)

 

WEBQUESTS

 

A webquest often takes the form of a mystery or problem for students to solve online. It generally features a task for students to complete using pre-provided links to information.

 

Lamb (2004, p. 38) has described a webquest as ‘a particular type of inquiry-based activity that asks students to use Web-based resources and tools to transform what they are learning into meaningful understandings and real-world projects.’

 

Webquests also have the following benefits:

- most or all of the information is found on pre-selected websites

- learners do not have to spend substantial time using search tools

- web-based information is used to address high-level questions.

(Lamb, 2004, p. 38)

 

OVERVIEW

 

The webquest sets five tasks for completion under the following headings:

- The history of immigration in Australia

- Why did/do people migrate to Australia?

- What are the contributions/impacts of immigration in Australia?

- Preparation for the interview [with someone who has migrated to Australia from another country]

- The interview

 

In completing these tasks, students hear narratives told by migrants to Australia, and identify occupations, skills and culinary traditions migrants have brought with them.

 

Students carry out the following exercises in their journey through the webquest:

- define terms

- create a timeline, survey, graph and mindmap

- collaborate with classmates

- conduct an interview.

 

MODIFICATION

This webquest has been developed for Victorian primary school students in year 4, and makes excellent use of local resources from  Museum Victoria. The content is relevant to Stage 2 (year 3 and 4) students in NSW, however some of the activities may need to be modified for younger students – for instance, tasks 4 and 5 might be changed to ask students to formulate interview questions, rather than conduct the interview itself. 

 

ASSESSMENT

The five tasks in the webquest are designed to stand as assessment tasks, and an evaluation rubric is provided: http://jesselda-webquest.wikispaces.com/Evaluation

 

RESOURCES

The webquest author (unfortunately uncredited) has created a comprehensive resources and links page

http://jesselda-webquest.wikispaces.com/Credits

 

The Teacher’s Page (http://jesselda-webquest.wikispaces.com/Teachers+Page) features teacher resources and outlines links to the Victorian curriculum.

 

REFERENCES

Lamb, A. (2004). WebQuests. School Library Media Activities Monthly 21 (2), p. 38

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Inquiry questions for topic of migration

The feature provides an introduction to the study of immigration to the United States focusing only on the immigrant groups that arrived in greatest numbers during the 19th and early 20th centuries.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Some useful American based resources that can be adapted for learning about the impact of migration on Australia's national identity.

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Australia as a Nation: Vietnam and migration

Australia as a Nation: Vietnam and migration | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
This website has been designed for Primary School teachers. It  provides a whole unit of work aimed at stage 3 students looking at Vietnam and the migration to Australia. 
Catherine Smyth's insight:

A Stage 3 unit of work developed by final year B.Ed Primary students to support teaching and learning for the Australian history topic: Australia as a Nation

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World Vision: 'Get Connected' migration lesson plan

World Vision: 'Get Connected' migration lesson plan | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it

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Sonja Shuttleworth's curator insight, April 13, 2014 5:21 AM

World Vision Australia has a range of school resources linked to its magazine 'Get Connected'. The resources related to migration and asylum seekers are notable for their global perspective.

 

The migration lesson plan is a series of six lessons designed to accompany the issue of 'Get Connected' focusing on migration. The lesson plan covers the following aspects of migration:

- Australia’s immigration story

- Push and pull factors

- Types of migration

- Asylum seekers and refugees

- The migrant experience

- The role of government and NGOs.

 

The magazine itself  includes a number of personal narratives in the form of written case studies, and the lesson plan links to digital migration stories, part of acmi’s digital storytelling project: http://generator.acmi.net.au/education-themes

 

MODIFICATION

The migration lesson plan does not specify a target stage or age group, and seem to be geared towards upper primary and lower secondary students.

 

This means that some of the content and activities would need to be modified for Stage 2 students. This could be done by:

- limiting the amount of independent research that students are expected to complete for activities

- supplying the information instead, either as printouts or links to websites.

 

Lesson 6, ‘the role of government and NGOs’, may be more suitable for Stage 3 students, who look at ‘structures, roles, responsibilities and decision-making processes of State and federal governments’ (SSS3.8)

 

However, many of the activities in the lesson plan are already suitable for Stage 2 students. These include:

- creating a class graph or chart showing the regions that families come from

- making a poster of push-pull factors

- examining and interpreting maps.

 

RESOURCES

Although the lesson plan is free to download, the magazine itself is not available to download. It can be ordered from World Vision for $9.90 per copy.

http://www.worldvision.com.au/Libraries/School_Resources/Get_Connected_Order_Form_2012.pdf

 

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS 

Asylum seekers fact sheet

http://www.worldvision.com.au/Libraries/School_Resources/Asylum_seekers.pdf

 

The refugee journey

http://www.worldvision.com.au/Libraries/School_Resources/The_refugee_journey.pdf

 

LINKS TO OTHER SYLLABUS OUTCOMES

Stage 2 teachers could consider using texts with personal narratives to link this global perspective on migration to the English syllabus. Suggested texts include:

 

The Little Refugee, by Anh Do and Suzanne Do, illustrated by Bruce Whatley

- Anh Do's story about his family's escape from war-torn Vietnam and his childhood in Australia, told especially for children

http://www.allenandunwin.com/default.aspx?page=94&book=9781742378329

http://www.allenandunwin.com/_uploads/BookPdf/TeachersNotes/9781742378329.pdf

 

Harmony and understanding

http://www.blake.com.au/Harmony-and-Understanding-s/773.htm

A nonfiction series that fosters understanding, inclusion, tolerance and respect for the multicultural experience. Created in partnership with the Australian Multicultural Foundation

 

World Vision Australia and the Primary English Teaching Association Australia have also developed a unit of work called ‘Global people’

http://www.globalwords.edu.au/units/Refugees_UPY6_html/documents/GlobalWords_Refugees_UPY6print.pdf

 

The ‘Global people’ unit of work is based on the following texts:

‘Ziba Came on a Boat’, by Liz Lofthouse, illustrated by Robert Ingpen

‘Mahtab’s Story, by Libby Gleeson

‘Parvana’, by Deborah Ellis

‘Boy Overboard’, by Morris Gleitzman

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The impact of migration

The impact of migration | Primary history- Australia as a Nation | Scoop.it
The settlement at Port Phillip was less than twenty years old in 1851. With around 95,000 people, the colony was already considered a success and relied mainly on wool and wheat exports for its income.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Primary sources for teaching about the impact of migration on Australia.

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