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First taste of chocolate

"To be honest I do not know what they make of my beans," says farmer N'Da Alphonse. "I've heard they're used as flavoring in cooking, but I've never seen it. I do not even know if it's true." Watch how the Dutch respond to a cocoa bean in return or you can watch our entire episode on chocolate here.


Via Seth Dixon
Ruth Reynolds's insight:

Such an interesting video. The costs and benefits of our chocolate fetish.

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Keegan Johns's curator insight, August 27, 2014 10:01 AM

I think it is good for them to see and taste chocolate because they work very hard to grow and harvest the beans, but don't even know what they are used for. These people deserve to know what they are helping create because they work so hard and don't get paid that much for it.

 

-KJ

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:39 PM

Sad how the people who do the hard work so often enjoy the fruit of their labour.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:03 PM

It's interesting and fascinating to see how the workers that harvest the cocoa bean are so excited about the results of their hard work. Having grown up, our entire lives we have been exposed to chocolate and have taken it for granted, but seeing the men who gather the beans enjoy chocolate so much was cool because they did not know what the bean was being used for and seeing their hard work make something sweet is a nice surprise for them. Due to chocolate being expensive in Ivory Coast, the people can not enjoy the fruits of their labor as much as they would like, but shows how home grown products can't be enjoyed by those that make them.

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These twins can teach us a lot about racial identity

These twins can teach us a lot about racial identity | Global Education | Scoop.it
Maria says she's black and Lucy says she's white. Together, they prove none of this makes sense.

Via Seth Dixon
Ruth Reynolds's insight:

Amazing- what an intersting beginner to a discussion

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Teresa Herrin's curator insight, March 5, 10:52 AM

Okay, I'm justifying my post of this article to my AP Government page because:

1. It is really interesting.

2. As you know, politics is all too often about racial differences.

Sharrock's curator insight, March 5, 11:30 AM

This is another issue that high school students can research as part of a presentation about race, class, and social identity. This may be useful in Health classes with a link to resilience while other subjects like social studies (and social studies electives) might facilitate appreciation of the USA's obsession with race and ethnicity --contrary to scientific findings that race is more a political construct than a scientific concept. English/writing courses might explore the concept of identity, of "passing" as straight white male/female in literature, folklore, movies, and can elicit creative responses sharing such experiences in poetry, short stories, art works. 

Christian Allié's curator insight, Today, 3:26 AM

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Seth Dixon's insight:

These twins also have three siblings and they say "we are at opposite ends of the [skin color] spectrum and they are all somewhere in between."  Their lives show that the differences underlying the cultural constructs of "white" and "black" as discrete categories isn't defensible, but it doesn't mean that it isn't culturally important.  As stated in the article, "here's no question that the way people categorize Lucy and Maria, and the way they think of themselves, will affect their lives.  That's because, even though race is highly subjective, racism and discrimination based on what people believe about race are very real."

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StockSnap.io - Beautiful Free Stock Photos

StockSnap.io - Beautiful Free Stock Photos | Global Education | Scoop.it
The #1 source for beautiful free stock photos. High quality and high resolution images free from all copyright restrictions - no attribution required.
Ruth Reynolds's insight:

Be careful to be sure you do have free copyright but these look good

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For Florists, Roses A Nerve-Racking Business Around Valentines Day

For Florists, Roses A Nerve-Racking Business Around Valentines Day | Global Education | Scoop.it
Valentines Day is this one day when one product — a red rose — is worth two or three times more than it is at any other time of the year. If a florist catches that window, he's golden. But the process of getting the roses to is fraught with risk, middlemen, crazy expense and bad weather.

Via Seth Dixon
Ruth Reynolds's insight:

International dependency. Economics and Business. A clever way to bring many dimensions into one by following the flower market. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 8:47 AM

This NPR podcast looks at the economic fluctuations of the flower market based on the cultural festival that is Valentines Day, and this Guardian article examines the economic development issues in the commodity chain for cut flowers (focused on Colombia). 

Nicky Mohan's curator insight, February 14, 7:07 PM

Valentines day followed by Mother's day and Father's day etc etc

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Too rich for its own good

Too rich for its own good | Global Education | Scoop.it
The Democratic Republic of Congo is potentially one of the richest countries on earth, but colonialism, slavery and corruption have turned it into one of the poorest

Via Seth Dixon
Ruth Reynolds's insight:

Amazingly disgraceful. I was in Zaire in 1970s and it too had a colonial legacy, also Belgian, which still affects me today.  This is a problem of 1st world making

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Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 17, 2014 7:09 PM

This is a very good information for those people who do not know the situation in DR Congo (I include myself). Is very sad to see these kind of things or situation. The DR Congo is one of the richest countries on earth, but because of the colonialism , slavery and CORRUPTION have turned it into one of the poorest. This article mentions that there is a war in which at least more than 5 million of people have died. This historian, Dan Snow , is telling us how awful in the situation in DR Congo. In the end of this article, he answer many question made by the public, but the last question was the one that I find interesting. the question says if he could pick just one thing to change in Congo, what would be, he answer "The rule of law. People need protection when rights are violated, to start businesses and to find out where the money goes." I think that if that happen, life in DR Congo will be better.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 3:26 PM

The Democratic Republic of Congo is a prime example of the long term effects of imperialistic resource exploitation. The DRC is blessed with an abundance of natural resources that could potentially make it incredibly wealthy. Unfortunately, foreign interest has created a disconnect between the DRC and its resources. Historically, imperialistic forces have stripped the country from any form of self-run government, causing power struggles between different indigenous peoples and a history of war, political chaos and corruption. Though it is no longer a colony controlled by a foreign country, international corporations are still using the unequal development in order to benefit while the country itself lies in shambles. 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:49 AM

Through centuries of perpetual instability has led to the Congo's current squalid conditions. Because of the countries rich natural resources and massive size, its infrastructure was intentionally destroyed in order easier access to its natural wealth. This shows how abundant resources can be a negative factor, by attracting predatory foreigners who care nothing for the local populous. It also shows how important strong political and cultural structures are necessary to create cohesion and security in a country.

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What Westerners can learn from the Hajj

What Westerners can learn from the Hajj | Global Education | Scoop.it

"Though it may come as a surprise to outsiders, the journey to Mecca is a manifestation of globally moderate Islam."


The Mecca region of Saudi Arabia has recently been in the midst of Hajj season. The Hajj, or pilgrimage to Mecca, is strongly encouraged of all Muslims who have the means to undertake it. Importantly, by bringing together 2 million to 3 million people from across the globe, the Hajj pilgrimage is a manifestation of the diversity and moderate nature of global Islam. This image of the Muslim world as cosmopolitan and reasonable stands in stark contrast to the militant Islamist fundamentalism we more regularly hear about in media coverage — with the Islamic State and Boko Haram being the most recent manifestation of this.


Tags: Islam, Saudi Arabia, culture, religion, Middle East.


Via Seth Dixon
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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 30, 2014 9:21 PM

This article can absolutely be used as a teaching resource to the rest of the world about the Muslim people.  These people are not crazed plane hijackers and suicide bombers as a whole, but rather a group of very peaceful people.  Looking at the hajj we can see this.  People from all over the world save their money to make this pilgrimage.  Doing so this brings together millions of Muslims without incident.  If people were exposed to more of this information rather than only to groups like ISIS and the other people that portray Islam in a bad light they might begin to understand that Muslims are not bad people but a much more peaceful group than we think.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 1:33 PM

While media coverage focuses on ISIS, extremists, and fundamentalists, Islam is much more than that. Negative light has caused major discrimination against Muslims, mostly because they associate all of them with the violence depicted on TV. This article focuses on the Hajj, or pilgrimage to Mecca. During Hajj season, millions of people flock to Mecca, creating an open environment of commerce, creativity, knowledge, and togetherness. Despite the media's representation, Mecca and most of the people there are incredibly open and progressive. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:39 PM

"Rather than focusing on the activities of marginal, Islamist splinter groups, we need to continually recall that the Muslim majority is much more progressive, outward-looking and cosmopolitan" This quote is exactly what the article is trying to get at. The western part of the world is only used to seeing the small group of radical Muslim groups that the media shows and by exposing just that portion of the religion, we get the wrong impression about an entire nation. Keeping an open mind and taking the time to learn about culture and people can drastically alter our perception of them.

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The Maker Movement Finds Its Way Into Urban Classrooms

The Maker Movement Finds Its Way Into Urban Classrooms | Global Education | Scoop.it
How we will learn
Ruth Reynolds's insight:

Children learn by experimenting and so do we!!!

Talked about this today - while preservice teachers tried to work out how to use I Movie on i Pad. We all learned so much

!!

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Animated GIFs of Earth Over Time

Animated GIFs of Earth Over Time (7 photos)
Ruth Reynolds's insight:

Gosh- amazing change in such a short period of time. Consider both our Geography and HIstory syllabuses in school.

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Childfund Connect | Global Education Resources | Videos and photostories made by children around the world

Childfund Connect | Global Education Resources | Videos and photostories made by children around the world | Global Education | Scoop.it
ChildFund Connect is a global education program that connects children in communities in Australia, Laos, Sri Lanka, Timor-Leste and Vietnam, with the aim of exchanging cultures and learning about each other's lives.
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Check out other links on this site Great for GEography

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Global Learning Centre - Educational Resources

Global Learning Centre - Educational Resources | Global Education | Scoop.it
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Take a look at their wonderful resources and ideas.

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Metropolis TV - Topics - Chocolate - Watch episode: Chocolate

Chocolate
Ruth Reynolds's insight:

Chocolate- the global connections

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SBE Activity

SBE Activity | Global Education | Scoop.it
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making solar ovens - lots of different ways - this looks good

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Tsunamis Generated by Megathrust Earthquakes - YouTube

Earthquakes Subduction-zone mega-thrust earthquakes, the most powerful earthquakes in the world, can produce tsunamis through a variety of structures that ar...
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Some useful videos

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What do you want leaders to do with technology?

What do you want leaders to do with technology? | Global Education | Scoop.it
Recently in a workshop, I asked the group how many people thought Twitter was "stupid", to which had seen several hands raised.  I followed up with the question, "How many of you think it is benefi...
Ruth Reynolds's insight:

Yes technology is a tool- not the answer

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Teaching the Geography of Food

Teaching the Geography of Food | Global Education | Scoop.it
By Seth Dixon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geography, Rhode Island College  Food. It's something we all think about, talk about, and need. Food has been one major topic of interest at National Ge...
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Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques

Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques | Global Education | Scoop.it
Self-taught Iranian photographer gains rare access to shoot religious buildings as they've never been seen.
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How cultures around the world make decisions

How cultures around the world make decisions | Global Education | Scoop.it
Is the American obsession with individual freedom really such a great idea? What other cultures know about how to make good choices.
Ruth Reynolds's insight:

This is such an interesting theme. The whole debate about History curriculums and the message they are trying to sell fits with this idea that our cultural'talk' drives us more than we think.

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Rescooped by Ruth Reynolds from iPads in Education
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5 Powerful iPad Apps to Help Teachers Organize Their Workflow ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

5 Powerful iPad Apps to Help Teachers Organize Their Workflow ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Global Education | Scoop.it
There are now a wide variety of iPad apps that you can use to organize your life and create an effective workflow. In this regard, I handpicked for you some really interesting apps that you should definitely consider to enhance your productivity. These apps provide a bunch of excellent features such as : easy ways to create to-do lists, scheduled notifications, reminders, notifications of upcoming tasks and events, and many more. Some of these apps are also integrated with Google and Google Apps accounts .

Via John Evans
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Sally Tilley's curator insight, October 9, 2014 5:43 PM

Love a bit of organisational brilliance! Thanks for sharing @joevans

 

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10 iPad Features Every iPad Owner Should Know

10 iPad Features Every iPad Owner Should Know | Global Education | Scoop.it
Are you relatively new to iPads in the classroom? Are you looking for some tips to help you navigate the new iOS 7? Today we take a look at 10 Features Every iPad Owner Should Know, so that you hav...
Ruth Reynolds's insight:

I feel I am underusing my i Pad!!!

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EU debates biopiracy law to protect indigenous people

EU debates biopiracy law to protect indigenous people | Global Education | Scoop.it
Pharmaceutical companies would need to compensate indigenous people for using their knowhow in creating new medicines

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 25, 2014 10:16 AM

new vocabulary for us all and unit 5!

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:27 PM

APHG-Unit 4

Shawn Wright's curator insight, September 7, 2014 8:20 AM

The  Nagoya protocol is an international biological diversity convention. The protocol would at it's core require permission, acknowledgment of source knowledge  or practice and compensation for the use of cultural wisdom.


i don't see Nagoya as a perfect solution - there is a lot of room for language interpretation so slick corporate lawyers will find ways to legally cheat indigenous peoples from their share but I do see it as at least A small step in the right direction.   


The World Health Organisation estimates that 4 billion people, 80% of the world's population, use herbal medicine in primary healthcare. 


Cherokees Believe and have practiced healing from plant and water for thousands of years. Every and any human sickness has a plant who can cure it. Every plant in the world has a purpose if we but learn to hear and understand what that is - there are no weeds to the Cherokee.


Yona Shawn

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Year 5 History: Chinese Migration and the Gold Rush

Year 5 History: Chinese Migration and the Gold Rush | Global Education | Scoop.it
The reasons people migrated to Australia from Europe and Asia, and the experiences and contributions of a particular migrant group within a colony. (ACHHK096)
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Keep revisiting this site

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First taste of chocolate

"To be honest I do not know what they make of my beans," says farmer N'Da Alphonse. "I've heard they're used as flavoring in cooking, but I've never seen it. I do not even know if it's true." Watch how the Dutch respond to a cocoa bean in return or you can watch our entire episode on chocolate here.


Via Seth Dixon
Ruth Reynolds's insight:

Such an interesting video. The costs and benefits of our chocolate fetish.

more...
Keegan Johns's curator insight, August 27, 2014 10:01 AM

I think it is good for them to see and taste chocolate because they work very hard to grow and harvest the beans, but don't even know what they are used for. These people deserve to know what they are helping create because they work so hard and don't get paid that much for it.

 

-KJ

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:39 PM

Sad how the people who do the hard work so often enjoy the fruit of their labour.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:03 PM

It's interesting and fascinating to see how the workers that harvest the cocoa bean are so excited about the results of their hard work. Having grown up, our entire lives we have been exposed to chocolate and have taken it for granted, but seeing the men who gather the beans enjoy chocolate so much was cool because they did not know what the bean was being used for and seeing their hard work make something sweet is a nice surprise for them. Due to chocolate being expensive in Ivory Coast, the people can not enjoy the fruits of their labor as much as they would like, but shows how home grown products can't be enjoyed by those that make them.

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India 2014

India 2014 | Global Education | Scoop.it
Ruth Reynolds's insight:

How are we the same and how are we different. India is aiming fairly to run the largest democratic elections in the world. Maybe after our chaos in Western Asutralia we could learn from them.

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