Preventive Medicine
3.1K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
onto Preventive Medicine
Scoop.it!

What The Color of Your Urine Says About You (Infographic)

What The Color of Your Urine Says About You (Infographic) | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
Human urine has been a useful tool of diagnosis since the earliest days of medicine. The color, density, and smell of urine can reveal much about the state of o
more...
No comment yet.
Preventive Medicine
Migrating Healthcare From Reactive To Predictive And Beyond
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

The science behind food cravings

The science behind food cravings | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
Exhibition examines the science behind food cravings
ClickTell Consulting's insight:

Notice the term “anti-trigger” used in the video (at 1:22). This is a way of avoiding a usually advertising/neuromarketing driven urge for a person to make an impulse purchase - such as suddenly stopping in a high street to buy certain food once that person has been exposed to a certain smell.

 

In our last year’s  blog post reply on the Centre For Connected Health we introduced a similar term referred to as “Counterising”, for counteracting advertising. You can read more from here:

 

http://chealthblog.connectedhealth.org/2014/02/03/making-health-addictive-employ-subliminal-messaging/#comment-4764

 

For your convenience the blog post reply in question is also reproduced below:

 

February 28, 2014 12:46 pm

Jo,

A great post. Blended delicately, neuroscience, marketing and advertising can produce the sweetest pill that preventive care of today could wish for.

 

A while back at my company we coined the term “Counterising”, for counteracting advertising. This came about as a result of trying to formulate an effective evidence-based model to encourage a healthy lifestyle in the field of chronic disorders.

 

Needless to say implemented properly insight of this nature offers a tremendously healthy ROI. Why else would companies such Coca-Cola & McDonalds spend as much money as they do in successfully trying to encourage us to buy into their message and product?

 

Sepe Sehati,
ClickTell Consulting

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Coffee, including caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: a systematic review and dose–response meta-analysis

Objectives To examine the association between coffee, including caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and assess the influence of HCC aetiology and pre-existing liver disease.

Design We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis. We calculated relative risks (RRs) of HCC according to caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee consumption using a random-effects dose–response meta-analysis. We tested for modification of the effect estimate by HCC aetiology and pre-existing liver disease. We judged the quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria.

Results We found 18 cohorts, involving 2 272 642 participants and 2905 cases, and 8 case–control studies, involving 1825 cases and 4652 controls. An extra two cups per day of coffee was associated with a 35% reduction in the risk of HCC (RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.72). The inverse association was weaker for cohorts (RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.77), which were generally of higher quality than case–control studies (RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.69). There was evidence that the association was not significantly altered by stage of liver disease or the presence/absence of high alcohol consumption, high body mass index, type 2 diabetes mellitus, smoking, or hepatitis B and C viruses. An extra two cups of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee (2 and 3 cohort studies, respectively) were associated with reductions of 27% (RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.85) and 14% (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.00) in the risk of HCC. However, due to a lack of randomised controlled trials, potential publication bias and there being no accepted definition of coffee, the quality of evidence under the GRADE criteria was ‘very low’.

Conclusions Increased consumption of caffeinated coffee and, to a lesser extent, decaffeinated coffee are associated with reduced risk of HCC, including in pre-existing liver disease. These findings are important given the increasing incidence of HCC globally and its poor prognosis.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Popular heartburn drugs linked to higher death risk

Popular heartburn drugs linked to higher death risk | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
Popular heartburn drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been linked to a variety of health problems, including serious kidney damage, bone fractures and dementia. Now, a new study from Washington University Schoo
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Why does acupuncture work? Study finds it elevates nitric oxide, leading to pain reduction

Why does acupuncture work? Study finds it elevates nitric oxide, leading to pain reduction | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
The use of acupuncture to treat pain dates back to the earliest recorded history in China. Despite centuries of acupuncture, it's still not clear why this method of applying and stimulating tiny needles at certain point
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Research suggests association between gut bacteria and emotion

Research suggests association between gut bacteria and emotion | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
Researchers have identified gut microbiota that interact with brain regions associated with mood and behavior. This may be the first time that behavioral and neurobiological differences associated with microbial compositio
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Altering gut bacteria pathways may stimulate fat tissue to prevent obesity

Altering gut bacteria pathways may stimulate fat tissue to prevent obesity | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
Cleveland Clinic researchers have uncovered a biological link between gut bacteria metabolism and obesity. The team showed that blocking a specific intestinal microbial pathway can prevent obesity and insulin resistance
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Study finds new link between omega fatty acids and bowel cancer

Study finds new link between omega fatty acids and bowel cancer | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
A study by the University of Aberdeen has found that a higher concentration of the molecules that breakdown omega-3 fatty acids is associated with a higher chance of survival from bowel cancer.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Extra‐virgin olive oil ameliorates cognition and neuropathology of the 3xTg mice: role of autophagy

Extra‐virgin olive oil ameliorates cognition and neuropathology of the 3xTg mice: role of autophagy | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
Consumption of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), a major component of the Mediterranean diet, has been associated with reduced incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms involved i
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Pre-clinical study suggests Parkinson's could start in gut endocrine cells

Pre-clinical study suggests Parkinson's could start in gut endocrine cells | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
Recent research on Parkinson's disease has focused on the gut-brain connection, examining patients' gut bacteria, and even how severing the vagus nerve connecting the stomach and brain might protect some people from the debilitatin
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Sulforaphane in broccoli sprouts found to improve glucose levels in diabetics

Sulforaphane in broccoli sprouts found to improve glucose levels in diabetics | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
A team of researchers from Sweden, the U.S. and Switzerland has found that treating rat liver cells with a compound called sulforaphane, which is found in cruciferous vegetables, reduced production of glucose. In their pape
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acids and Prostate Cancer Risk in the SELECT Trial | JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute | Oxford Academic

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Comparison of nutritional quality between conventional and organic dairy products: a meta‐analysis

Comparison of nutritional quality between conventional and organic dairy products: a meta‐analysis | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
As a contribution to the debate on the comparison of nutritional quality between conventional versus organic products, the present study would like to provide new results on this issue specificall
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Timing meals later at night can cause weight gain and impair fat metabolism

Timing meals later at night can cause weight gain and impair fat metabolism | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
New findings suggest eating late at night could be more dangerous than you think. Compared to eating earlier in the day, prolonged delayed eating can increase weight, insulin and cholesterol levels, and negatively affec
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Knee arthroscopy versus conservative management in patients with degenerative knee disease: a systematic review

Objective To determine the effects and complications of arthroscopic surgery compared with conservative management strategies in patients with degenerative knee disease.

Design Systematic review.

Main outcome measures Pain, function, adverse events.

Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Google Scholar and Open Grey up to August 2016.

Eligibility criteria For effects, randomised clinical trials (RCTs) comparing arthroscopic surgery with a conservative management strategy (including sham surgery) in patients with degenerative knee disease. For complications, RCTs and observational studies.

Review methods Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias for patient-important outcomes. A parallel guideline committee ( BMJ Rapid Recommendations) provided input on the design and interpretation of the systematic review, including selection of patient-important outcomes. We used the GRADE approach to rate the certainty (quality) of the evidence.

Results We included 13 RCTs and 12 observational studies. With respect to pain, the review identified high-certainty evidence that knee arthroscopy results in a very small reduction in pain up to 3 months (mean difference =5.4 on a 100-point scale, 95% CI 2.0 to 8.8) and very small or no pain reduction up to 2 years (mean difference =3.1, 95% CI −0.2 to 6.4) when compared with conservative management. With respect to function, the review identified moderate-certainty evidence that knee arthroscopy results in a very small improvement in the short term (mean difference =4.9 on a 100-point scale, 95% CI 1.5 to 8.4) and very small or no improved function up to 2 years (mean difference =3.2, 95% CI −0.5 to 6.8). Alternative presentations of magnitude of effect, and associated sensitivity analyses, were consistent with the findings of the primary analysis. Low-quality evidence suggested a very low probability of serious complications after knee arthroscopy.

Conclusions Over the long term, patients who undergo knee arthroscopy versus those who receive conservative management strategies do not have important benefits in pain or function.

Trial registration number PROSPERO CRD42016046242.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Risk of death among users of Proton Pump Inhibitors: a longitudinal observational cohort study of United States veterans

Objective Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely used, and their use is associated with increased risk of adverse events. However, whether PPI use is associated with excess risk of death is unknown. We aimed to examine the association between PPI use and risk of all-cause mortality.

Design Longitudinal observational cohort study.

Setting US Department of Veterans Affairs.

Participants Primary cohort of new users of PPI or histamine H2 receptor antagonists (H2 blockers) (n=349 312); additional cohorts included PPI versus no PPI (n=3 288 092) and PPI versus no PPI and no H2 blockers (n=2 887 030).

Main outcome measures Risk of death.

Results Over a median follow-up of 5.71 years (IQR 5.11–6.37), PPI use was associated with increased risk of death compared with H2 blockers use (HR 1.25, CI 1.23 to 1.28). Risk of death associated with PPI use was higher in analyses adjusted for high-dimensional propensity score (HR 1.16, CI 1.13 to 1.18), in two-stage residual inclusion estimation (HR 1.21, CI 1.16 to 1.26) and in 1:1 time-dependent propensity score-matched cohort (HR 1.34, CI 1.29 to 1.39). The risk of death was increased when considering PPI use versus no PPI (HR 1.15, CI 1.14 to 1.15), and PPI use versus no PPI and no H2 blockers (HR 1.23, CI 1.22 to 1.24). Risk of death associated with PPI use was increased among participants without gastrointestinal conditions: PPI versus H2 blockers (HR 1.24, CI 1.21 to 1.27), PPI use versus no PPI (HR 1.19, CI 1.18 to 1.20) and PPI use versus no PPI and no H2 blockers (HR 1.22, CI 1.21 to 1.23). Among new PPI users, there was a graded association between the duration of exposure and the risk of death.

Conclusions The results suggest excess risk of death among PPI users; risk is also increased among those without gastrointestinal conditions and with prolonged duration of use. Limiting PPI use and duration to instances where it is medically indicated may be warranted.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

New study links antibiotic resistance to common household disinfectant triclosan

New study links antibiotic resistance to common household disinfectant triclosan | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
Scientists from the University of Birmingham and Norwich Research Park have discovered a link between a major mechanism of antibiotic resistance and resistance to the disinfectant triclosan which is commonly found in domesti
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Response of Local Nitric Oxide Release to Manual Acupuncture and Electrical Heat in Humans: Effects of Reinforcement Methods

Response of Local Nitric Oxide Release to Manual Acupuncture and Electrical Heat in Humans: Effects of Reinforcement Methods | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (eCAM) is an international peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that seeks to understand the sources and to encourage rigorous research in this new, yet ancient world of complementary and alternative medicine.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Why does acupuncture work? Study finds it elevates nitric oxide, leading to pain reduction

Why does acupuncture work? Study finds it elevates nitric oxide, leading to pain reduction | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
The use of acupuncture to treat pain dates back to the earliest recorded history in China. Despite centuries of acupuncture, it's still not clear why this method of applying and stimulating tiny needles at certain point
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Study of US seniors strengthens link between air pollution and premature death

Study of US seniors strengthens link between air pollution and premature death | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
A new study of 60 million Americans—about 97% of people age 65 and older in the United States—shows that long-term exposure to airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone increases the risk of premature death
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Common water treatments could damage DNA

Common water treatments could damage DNA | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
Scientists are warning that a water treatment widely used in developing countries could be damaging the DNA of those drinking it.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Extra-virgin olive oil preserves memory and protects brain against Alzheimer's: study

Extra-virgin olive oil preserves memory and protects brain against Alzheimer's: study | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
The Mediterranean diet, rich in plant-based foods, is associated with a variety of health benefits, including a lower incidence of dementia. Now, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Research finds common household chemicals lead to birth defects in mice

Research finds common household chemicals lead to birth defects in mice | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
A new study at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM) and the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech has found a connection between common household chemicals and birth defects.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

E-cigarettes potentially as harmful as tobacco cigarettes, study shows

E-cigarettes potentially as harmful as tobacco cigarettes, study shows | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
A study by chemists at the University of Connecticut offers new evidence that electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes are potentially as harmful as tobacco cigarettes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Snake Oil Supplements — Information is Beautiful

Snake Oil Supplements — Information is Beautiful | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
Do echinacea & Vitamin C kill colds? Will turmeric, goji berries or wheatgrass help you live to 150? The supplements that pass randomised, controlled trials...and the ones that are snake oil.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Low-dose THC can relieve stress; more does just the opposite

Low-dose THC can relieve stress; more does just the opposite | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
Cannabis smokers often report that they use the drug to relax or relieve stress, but few studies provide clinical evidence of these effects.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ClickTell Consulting
Scoop.it!

Tea consumption leads to epigenetic changes in women

Tea consumption leads to epigenetic changes in women | Preventive Medicine | Scoop.it
Epigenetic changes are chemical modifications that turn our genes off or on. In a new study from Uppsala University, researchers show that tea consumption in women leads to epigenetic changes in genes that are known to interac
more...
No comment yet.