Preventing Human Errors
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Customer Feedback vs Customer Experience Measurement

What is the difference between opt-in customer feedback versus random-sample customer experience measurement? 'Feedback' direct to the company and via social is (Opt-in feedback vs Random sample #measurement - what's the difference?

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Ali Anani's curator insight, January 19, 2014 5:59 AM

A very insightful presentation on customers' feedback

Dawn Wright's curator insight, January 20, 2014 10:17 PM

Suspicions confirmed. Opt-in customer feedback probably catches the extremes of attitudes.

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Why Employees Make Stupid Mistakes

Why Employees Make Stupid Mistakes | Preventing Human Errors | Scoop.it
Tired of employees whose seemingly careless mistakes cost you time and money? Before you fire them, read this.
How many times have you asked yourself why no one else in your company has common sense?

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Have we not moved on from 'Blaming people' yet? Most errors come from complicated systems, poor or no processes in place, bad toolset etc...

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Bec Reed's curator insight, April 7, 7:45 PM

Human error and prevention

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The Pokayoke Software Development Guide | Java Code Geeks

The Pokayoke Software Development Guide | Java Code Geeks | Preventing Human Errors | Scoop.it
Aaron Swartz has written up a guide for software development from idea to launch. He calls it “The Pokayoke Guide to Developing Software”. I was unfamiliar with the word “Pokayoke”, but it means mistake-proofing, i.e., ...

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What is Poka-yoke ?

Poka-yoke - is a mistake proofing method that eliminates mistakes and defects, ensuring quality products and services. It originated from Japanese lean manuf...

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Nice video

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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, July 23, 2013 5:01 AM

POKA-YOKE = Japanese term which means mistake proofing.

 

A poka-yoke device is one that prevents incorrect parts from being made or assembled, or easily identifies a flaw or error.

 

Or “mistake-proofing,” – a means of providing a visual or other signal to indicate a characteristic state. Often referred to as “error-proofing,” poka-yoke is actually the first step in truly error-proofing a system.

 

Error-proofing is a manufacturing technique of preventing errors by designing the manufacturing process, equipment, and tools so that an operation literally cannot be performed incorrectly.

 

To avoid (yokeru) inadvertent errors (poka).

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Achieving Perfection Through Mistake-Proofing | IndustryWeek

Achieving Perfection Through Mistake-Proofing | IndustryWeek | Preventing Human Errors | Scoop.it

"Mistake proofing can make a significant difference in the output of any process [....]  Mistake-proofing devices should meet three criteria:

Simple

Infallible

Effortless"


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Michel Baudin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 12:19 PM

The article makes the point that mistake-proofing must be "effortless." The way I usually say it is that a mistake-proofing/poka-yoke device must not add labor, a point that is frequently missed in discussions of this topic in the US. 

 

Why is it essential? Because any device that adds labor is guaranteed to be by-passed under pressure. If preventing a mistake requires one more gesture, on any day where "we have to ship all this by 6:00PM," the organization will find a way around it. 

 

Mistake-proofing makes a difference in any process where human error is a major cause of failure. Many processes qualify, but not all. If the main cause of defects is the machine's  inability to hold tolerances consistently, mistake-proofing will not do much good. 

 

Yes, a device that is fallible cannot be considered mistake-proofing. Usability engineering, for example, provides user interfaces  that make mistakes unlikely, but not impossible. Sometimes it is sufficient, but it is not mistake-proofing. 

 

The one criterion I have an issue with is simplicity. A mistake-proofing device must be simple to use, I agree, and its design should not be anymore complex than necessary. However, where the stakes in human error are high, as in airliner cockpits or semiconductor process equipment, preventing mistakes may require elaborate technology. If a device for this purpose  works every time and adds no labor, I see no reason to deny it the "mistake-proofing" label. 

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How to avoid human mistakes in production? The lean approach.

How to avoid human mistakes in production? The lean approach. | Preventing Human Errors | Scoop.it
Human operators make mistakes. But there are solutions: adopting the right philosophy, mistake-proofing each process, and self-inspection. (How to avoid human mistakes in production? The lean approach.

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Michel Baudin's curator insight, August 1, 2013 2:49 PM

Renaud Anjoran shares his experience of mistake-proofing in Chinese factories, and quotes "Lean Assembly." Thanks.

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Mistake Proofing (Poka-Yoke) in Six Sigma

Mistake Proofing (Poka-Yoke) in Six Sigma Be a Money Belt! Free Lean Six Sigma Yellow Belt Training at www.lssyb.com It's easy ...youtube.com

Via Steven Bonacorsi
Georgesvc's insight:

Here you have Jay explaining mistake proofing. This is a good video explaining Poka Yoke in as simple as possible. However I do not agree with Jay that only systems make mistakes and not the Humans. Yes, 80% of the mistakes come from systems, but 20% of errors originate with Humans.

For example not drinking enough water dehydrates you and when you need all your faculties to do your work and need full concentration, you will leave yourself open to making mistakes.

Other origins of human errors are distractions, noise, smell etc...

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Toyota Manufacturing Principles

Toyota Manufacturing Principles | Preventing Human Errors | Scoop.it

A few definitionsThroughout its history, Toyota has made a habit of labeling its business concepts and guiding values. In learning more about the company, I’ve picked up a few useful concepts from their manufacturing...

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here are a few definitions

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Bec Reed's curator insight, April 7, 7:46 PM

Reducing human error - risk prevention

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10 Best Computer Maintenance Tips to Speed Up & Optimize your PC

10 Best Computer Maintenance Tips to Speed Up & Optimize your PC | Preventing Human Errors | Scoop.it
Before you start making mistakes that could cost you the life of your precious new computer, you had better learn some computer repair tips how to take car

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What to look for on a gemba walk?

What to look for on a gemba walk? | Preventing Human Errors | Scoop.it

Shop floor observations include the overall design of the plant for production and internal logistics, as well as details that reveal how it is operated. You can tell whether it is a job-shop, a flow line, or a collection of flow lines. You can tell whether the flow of materials is visible, what kind of equipment is used for materials handling, and how much of the floor is used for warehousing versus production.

 

When you zoom in on individual stations, you can assess the level of automation and the attention that has been paid to the design of operator jobs.

 

You can also check out the accuracy of the signage, the presence and use of andons, mistake-proofing devices, production monitors, and team performance boards.

 

Several tools are available to help you see better, some of which require more than a quick visit. They include the following:

 

1) Using a Seven Wastes Checklist.

2) Following the flow.

3) Start counting people, machines, parts or fixtures.

4) Hunting for bugs.

5) Conducting video time studies.

 

“10 Questions asked on a Gemba Walk”:

 

1. What are the business issues with this product?

2. Who is responsible for the value stream for this product?

3. How are orders from the customer received?

4. Where is the pacemaker process, triggered by customer orders?

5. How capable, available, adequate, and waste-free are assembly activities?

6. How capable, available, adequate, and waste-free are the fabrication activities feeding assembly?

7. How are orders transmitted up the value stream from the pacemaker process?

8. How are materials supplied to the assembly and fabrication processes?

9. How are materials obtained from upstream suppliers?

10. How are employees trained in Lean procedures motivated to apply them?


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I kile this one.

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Quality Gurus - strategy, organization, levels, system, style, examples, manager, school, company, workplace

Quality Gurus - strategy, organization, levels, system, style, examples, manager, school, company, workplace | Preventing Human Errors | Scoop.it
Organizing, Outsourcing and Offshoring, Participative Management, Patents and Trademarks, Performance Measurement, Personality and Personality Tests, Pioneers of Management, Planning, Poison Pill Strategies, Poka-Yoke, etc… (Workers are responsible...

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A good list and history of Gurus like Deming, Juran etc...

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Benefits of Quality Assurance in Your Inbound Marketing - Business 2 Community

Benefits of Quality Assurance in Your Inbound Marketing - Business 2 Community | Preventing Human Errors | Scoop.it
Business 2 Community Benefits of Quality Assurance in Your Inbound Marketing Business 2 Community Time is money, and when mistakes happen, this usually equates to additional time spent on fixing errors, proofing, testing, approving and implementing...
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Use Realistic Tolerancing and Poka-yoke for Process Control

Use Realistic Tolerancing and Poka-yoke for Process Control | Preventing Human Errors | Scoop.it
An organization had a limited capital budget but needed to ensure its product was safely delivered in its own packaging. The organization used poka-yoke and realistic tolerancing to control its process improvements.

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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, July 23, 2013 4:56 AM

POKA-YOKE = Japanese term which means mistake proofing.

 

A poka-yoke device is one that prevents incorrect parts from being made or assembled, or easily identifies a flaw or error.

 

Or “mistake-proofing,” – a means of providing a visual or other signal to indicate a characteristic state. Often referred to as “error-proofing,” poka-yoke is actually the first step in truly error-proofing a system.

 

Error-proofing is a manufacturing technique of preventing errors by designing the manufacturing process, equipment, and tools so that an operation literally cannot be performed incorrectly.

 

To avoid (yokeru) inadvertent errors (poka).

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Shigeo Shingo's first name misspelled twice in article on mistake-proofing

“The causes of defects lie in worker errors, and defects are the results of neglecting those errors. It follows that mistakes will not turn into defects if worker errors are discovered and eliminated beforehand.” — Shiego Shingo, 1986

Sheiego Shingo, the Japanese industrial engineer credited as one of the world’s leading experts on manufacturing practices and the Toyota Production System, termed pre-mistake discovery and elimination as poka-yoke, which translates to “fool proofing” or more recently “mistake proofing.”


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Michel Baudin's curator insight, January 25, 2013 2:46 AM

And it is misspelled in two different ways!

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Chinese Government Recommends 'Idiot-Proof' Cellphones for Peasants - Liz ... - Foreign Policy

Chinese Government Recommends 'Idiot-Proof' Cellphones for Peasants - Liz ... - Foreign Policy | Preventing Human Errors | Scoop.it
Foreign Policy
Chinese Government Recommends 'Idiot-Proof' Cellphones for Peasants - Liz ...
Foreign Policy
Some Chinese government researchers don't appear to think much of the country's 651 million people living in the countryside.
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