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Outreach and Audience Engagement

Outreach and Audience Engagement | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
I'll admit it. I have a bad attitude about the word "outreach" in the context of the arts. Whether that attitude is rooted in the way the word has been used or in some quality inherent in it is not...
MAM Presenting's insight:

Borwick makes some great points in his post on audience engagement and outreach, in particular mentioning the fact that there IS a difference for each and every culture and art form that is out there. 

 

"Outreach is the principal activity of audience engagement" is a great way to see how both items relate and depend on one another. 

 

Furthermore, Borwick states some worthwhile items regarding "remembering that all engagement is about relationship formation and development...[through] Artists Meet Audiences...New Population Centers...New Venues[/]The Random Act of Culture events...[and] Relatable Cultural Idioms."

 

-Dan

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MAM Presenting's comment, December 8, 2013 12:12 PM
His discussion of " Relatable Cultural Narratives" is really interesting, and Borwick hits the nail on the head when he states "The presenter must believe in what they are doing to make this a successful approach" ! - Marissa
Brett.Ashley.Crawford's curator insight, December 8, 2013 8:40 PM

Intention within community seems key.

MAM Theater's comment, December 8, 2013 11:11 PM
This is great. I think this is what I was trying to get at during our conversation. Audience Engagement encompasses outreach as one aspect, creating dependence. I love the break down of engagement in terms of location and activity he provides as well (seth)
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Giving USA 2013 Report Highlights | MIT Office of Foundation Relations

Giving USA 2013 Report Highlights | MIT Office of Foundation Relations | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
MAM Presenting's insight:

According to the 2013 Giving USA report, in 2012, the "Arts, Humanities, and Culture" organizations accounted for only 5% of Americans' philanthropic efforts. Topping the list was religious organizations with 32%. As art managers, we need to be aware of this statistics and start marketing our message and connecting with more individuals. Funding is increasely declining and relying more and more on the donations of its patrons. --Vann

 

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Arts And Culture Adds $500 Billion To Nation's GDP

Arts And Culture Adds $500 Billion To Nation's GDP | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (AP) — Creative industries led by Hollywood account for about $504 billion, or at least 3.2 percent of U.S. goods and services, the government said in its first official measure of how the arts and culture affect the economy.
MAM Presenting's insight:

I am not quite sure how to feel about this report. Although it is great to have such an impressive number attached to the Arts and Culture sector - I find it to be somewhat misleading (and especially so with the newspaper's choice to use a picture of the Guggenheim as the main picture for the article).

 

The $500 Billion estimate includes figures from "Hollywood, the advertising industry, cable TV production, broadcasting, publishing, performing arts" and other industries. Personally, when I think of "Arts and Culture" - it does not conjure up pictures of the cable TV production and advertisting industries.With those industries included in that figure, it is pretty clear that that non-profit arts oganizations, like the Guggenheim, are not providing a significant portion of that $500 Bllion figure.

 

Do you think that considering the "Arts and Culture" industry in such a broad capacity for these calculations is helpful to visual and performing arts organizations? Or, could it actually be harmful?

- Marissa

 

 

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MAM Theater's comment, December 8, 2013 5:02 PM
Ying: Good question, Marissa. From my personal perspective, I believe visual and performing arts should be separated from entertainment, TV or broadcasting. However, since the boundaries between nonprofit and forprofit becomes more and more vague, it might be difficult to classify that clearly. But I think the main purpose of this report is to indicate the creative enterprises still have a growing market, and arts organizations are encouraged to do deeper research as regard to where their audience are and what they want to see.
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Outreach and Audience Engagement

Outreach and Audience Engagement | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
I'll admit it. I have a bad attitude about the word "outreach" in the context of the arts. Whether that attitude is rooted in the way the word has been used or in some quality inherent in it is not...
MAM Presenting's insight:

Borwick makes some great points in his post on audience engagement and outreach, in particular mentioning the fact that there IS a difference for each and every culture and art form that is out there. 

 

"Outreach is the principal activity of audience engagement" is a great way to see how both items relate and depend on one another. 

 

Furthermore, Borwick states some worthwhile items regarding "remembering that all engagement is about relationship formation and development...[through] Artists Meet Audiences...New Population Centers...New Venues[/]The Random Act of Culture events...[and] Relatable Cultural Idioms."

 

-Dan

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MAM Presenting's comment, December 8, 2013 12:12 PM
His discussion of " Relatable Cultural Narratives" is really interesting, and Borwick hits the nail on the head when he states "The presenter must believe in what they are doing to make this a successful approach" ! - Marissa
Brett.Ashley.Crawford's curator insight, December 8, 2013 8:40 PM

Intention within community seems key.

MAM Theater's comment, December 8, 2013 11:11 PM
This is great. I think this is what I was trying to get at during our conversation. Audience Engagement encompasses outreach as one aspect, creating dependence. I love the break down of engagement in terms of location and activity he provides as well (seth)
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A New Operatic Harmony in Berlin

A New Operatic Harmony in Berlin | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
City's leading houses, longtime rivals, now find reasons to work together.
MAM Presenting's insight:

This article is about how the three-house system in Berlin works out. It is interesting to see the proximity of the opera houses both in terms of artistic vision and location. It seems to them that, instead of getting hurt from the fierce competition, being across the street has put them in a better position to attract audiences.

 

This cooperating methodology can be inspiring for arts institutions that are facing with more and more competitors today. I really like Mr. Schwarz’s words in the end of the article: “We have to work together so that the whole world can say, this is where the most exciting opera is taking place”.

 

——Su

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MAM_Music's comment, November 30, 2013 11:07 AM
As much as exciting it is to have 3 established opera houses in only one city, there are also downsides to it. In Germany, cultural institutions rely heavily on public subsidies that cover around 80% of their income. In 2012/2013 the Berlin Opera Foundation alone received 121.5 million euros of public subsidies from the Federal State of Berlin. Given that, the independent art scene of the German capital has been protesting a lot in recent years against maintaining all three houses. Their main argument is that a lot of public money is wasted on the administrative apparatus of these big institutions, whereas it could benefit the arts directly. - Bianca
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At The Met, Textiles And Technology = Bad Match

At The Met, Textiles And Technology = Bad Match | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
Let me say from the outset that the Metropolitan Museum's* Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500–1800 -- billed as "the first major exhibition to explore the international transmittal...
MAM Presenting's insight:

This is about technology and the gallery/visual art, but I think it is very applicable to what we have been discussing this week in class.

 

The author bemoan's the use of technology in the Met's exhibition, "Interwoven Globe", but not because technology has no place in exhibition, but becuase it doesn't enhance the exhibit in any way. Instead,the Met seemingly uses "technology for technology's sake".

 

I think this highlights an issue that all arts organizations, including performing arts organizations, will struggle with over the next few years. As organizations scramble to compete with one another by implementing new technologies, those organizations still need to evaluate whether that technology will actually enhace the artistic product and experience of the audience/attendee. - Marissa

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MAM Presenting's comment, November 24, 2013 12:24 PM
Interesting article. Technology is not a criterion in arts competition any way, but a tool to be used to share the arts with audiences. Technology for technology's sake" could be dangerous, it may cause unnecessary high cost, which takes budget away from artistic programs. ——Su
MAM_Music's comment, November 24, 2013 4:58 PM
I definitely agree; for instance, we constantly come across organizations that start a Facebook page just to create one.. I understand that most, if not all, simply lack the manpower and staff time to regularly update and post on their pages, but these organizations aren't making new connections and broadening their scope by putting their name on a stagnant and lifeless page. As the article mentions, incorporating effective technology involves providing worthwhile information that will actually engage and peak interest. -Kimmy
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The Merger in Dayton

The Merger in Dayton | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
Three arts organizations in Dayton, Ohio, recently made history by merging together. The Dayton Ballet, Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra and Dayton Opera are now going to be one organization named Dayton Performing Alliance.
MAM Presenting's insight:

Although this article was published before this monumental merger had taken place, the questions Michael Kaiser poses shed new light onto the issues mergers can bring up, especially one in which a ballet, orchestra and an opera combine to form a new Performing Alliance.

 

Questions include topics such as fundraising, prioritization of projects, allocation of resources, "ensure that the art form that plans furthest ahead (typically opera) does not control the annual schedule and budget" and so forth. 

 

This is especially relevant to presenting organizations considering they deal with so many forms of art, each with their own issues, strategies and ways of conducting business. 

 

-Dan

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MAM_Music's comment, November 18, 2013 8:04 PM
Katie: Good questions regarding resource allocation, artistic programming, and marketing, especially as we prepare to hear from the Washington National Opera tomorrow. Also interesting to think about with regards to the HBR article that Vann posted regarding strategic collaboration among arts organizations. What opportunities for collaboration does this merger open up for the Dayton arts community? How can or will the ballet, orchestra, and opera take advantage of each other's artistic and administrative resources to enliven the arts experiences they provide in this midsized Midwestern city? Will the alliance afford them security to pursue artistic innovation and expand or deepen its relationship with local audiences?
MAM Theater's comment, November 18, 2013 10:25 PM
I'm especially interested by the fusion of the boards - how can that change feel seamless? Opera board members joined to act as advocates for the opera - what will happen when they also have to advocate for the ballet? Will anything change? <br>I wonder if this merger will lead to an increase in designated gifts. Perhaps they will decrease because of the greater impact of the gift on the arts in Dayton in general, but perhaps they will increase? (Caroline)
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Concert halls are the new studios

Concert halls are the new studios | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
(Thank you for not coughing.)
MAM Presenting's insight:

What is particularly interesting about this article is the perspective on how live recordings of orchestral concerts is changing the way the live audiences are expected to behave.

 

As live recordings and digital transmissions/live simulcasts become more common throughout the performing arts, it will be important for all organizations to determine out how to utilize these technologies without constraining/affecting the experience of the live audience. - Marissa

 

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The Critical Role of the Strategic Brand : Center for Social Innovation (CSI)

The Critical Role of the Strategic Brand : Center for Social Innovation (CSI) | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
MAM Presenting's insight:

Don't underestimate the power of the brand! This article features a video speech of Havard researcher who explains that a strong nonprofit brand will create "greater social impact and tighter organizational cohesion." 


I think this is so important for presenting organizations to know and understand. Developing a brand that is uniquing their's and sticking to that will help decision-making when it comes to programing and other management related issues. Having a brand is just as important as having your mission; the two coincide and work with each other to define the organization and promote its values. 


In today's cultural landscape, people look for brands; if something does not have a "brand," chances are it will not last long at all, whether it be food, companies, or clothes. This lecture speaks about how branding is no longer a means to publicize and promote. While branding still plays a big role in marketing, it is becoming more and more important in to the sustainability and cultural identity of nonprofit organizations. 


--Vann

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MAMDance's curator insight, December 2, 2013 6:21 PM

KF:  Thanks Vann for posting this article/sound byte.  The branding discussion applies nicely to the article I posted earlier on ballet dancers and brands and how companies are in danger of becoming homogenized.  It will be interesting to follow how ballet company's brands are affected as dancers move around.  What will this mean for their programming and how will a watered down brand affect their organization's identity?  Or, will they find a way to avoid losing their core brand?

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Developing a Contract or Written Agreement for Your Nonprofit Collaboration - Philanthropy Front and Center - New York

Developing a Contract or Written Agreement for Your Nonprofit Collaboration - Philanthropy Front and Center - New York | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
As nonprofit collaboration has gained momentum within the sector, the Foundation Center has been striving to offer plenty of programming and informational resources on the subject for organizations looking to work together.
MAM Presenting's insight:

Granted this article/post is from April 25th, 2012, it touches on many of the topics we have discussed in class, most recently contracts. The article further delves into the subject of non-profit collaboration (a topic that was mentioned many times at this past weekend’s NAMP conference), and what one’s agreement should reflect including goals/visions for the partnership, divisions of control/responsibility, timetable for collaboration etc…


As we have seen in class in addition to Professor Gurwin’s teachings, you can never be too careful regarding what you include in contracts. Always be sure to leave no possible outcome/stone unturned because it could make or break the future of your organization.


In discussions about these partnerships and collaboration, I feel it is crucial to also discuss the identity of the new partnership. Will it be a combination of both incoming entities? A new identity all together? What happens to the assets and IP of each organization…do they become fair game/fair-use for the other side?


-Dan

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Questions for the Future of the Arts

Questions for the Future of the Arts | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
Are we witnessing a major transition in the arts from regional organizations to fewer mega-organizations with the sophistication to mount large scale productions, to market them well and to raise large sums of money?
MAM Presenting's insight:

In this article, Michael Kaiser, President of the Kennedy Center, presents a number of questions about the future of arts organizations in light of the trend to broadcast performances.

 

Kaiser proposes a number of thought-provoking questions. However, I think the most jarring part of this article is that as more major organizations jump on the broadcasting bandwagon – just yesterday the Stratford Shakespeare Festival announced it will be the first North American theatre company to film their productions for worldwide distribution) – even an arts manager who has been dubbed “the Turnaround King” is truly concerned that these broadcasts may have dire consequences for arts organizations and the artistic product across the US.

 

What, then, does this mean for presenting organizations in particular?

 

As this technology advances and becomes cheaper, what motivation will there be arts organizations to tour? Will presenting organizations begin to incorporate movie theatres in their complexes? Or, perhaps, will the movie theatre become the presenter?

 

- Marissa

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MAMDance's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:22 PM

KF. An interesting article from Michael Kaiser posted by Marissa.  It's interesting to ponder these questions with a dance lens.  Already, two ballet companies have created reality/documentary tv programs.  Is broadcasting across the country with full performances the next step?  Although, public television and stations like Ovation do broadcast ballets to millions of homes.  If larger dance companies start growing their audience in the national market, will smaller, regional dance companies suffer?  I hope that won't happen, but it's definitely something to ponder. 

MAM_Music's curator insight, November 11, 2013 6:18 PM

Katie: Originally posted by Marissa (MAM Presenting) and rescooped by Kathleen (MAM Dance), Michael Kaiser poses a series of provocative questions on the impact that delivering artistic performance via multiple platforms will have on live performance, and particularly on mid-sized (regional) arts organizations. The tone of the piece is rather dire, and it seems, overly so. The fact that multiple arts organizations are utilizing non-standard modes of distribution (simulcasts, etc.) presents just as much opportunity as risk. Yes, a fear exists that people will stop attending live performances, leaving only a handful of "mega-organizations" to deliver content and by consequence allowing a relative few to attend live performances while the majority stream them in. But it also means that artistic performances now have the potential to reach more people than ever before, exposing (in theory) greater portions of the populace to artistic creations that may or may not be familiar via modes that are relevant to them. Taking the long view, this change may just as well increase interest in artistic performance, motivating people to donate and/or attend regional organizations. The future, of course, remains to be seen but can be anticipated with fear or curiousity, as an opportunity that might hurt the arts or that just might help them.

 

Side note: AMTLab contributor Ashley Mac is currently conducting exciting original research on this very topic. You can check it out here: http://amt-lab.org/blog/2013/10/research-update-from-simulcast-audience-to-live-audience

Brett.Ashley.Crawford's comment, November 11, 2013 8:32 PM
preview for this week :-)
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Sanford Weill Lures Zarin Mehta to Green Center

Sanford Weill Lures Zarin Mehta to Green Center | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
Sanford Weill is bringing in Mr. Mehta, the former president of the New York Philharmonic, to help run the Green Music Center in Sonoma County.
MAM Presenting's insight:

This is an interesting article about long-distance management. Zarin Mehta, former president of the New York Philharmonic is to co-run Green Music Center in California while he is not moving there.

 

The article mentioned some questions that have been raised: How the whole thing is actually going to work? Whether the center’s current operating budget can cover the high salary cost? Will the long-distance cooperation with the other executive director work out? In my opinion, the major problems come from communication and cultural difference.

 

Despite convenience in communication technologies nowadays, they still cannot replace face-to-face meetings and they obscure our senses to some extent. An email briefing might not be as effective as real talking. Also, there is a cultural difference between the East Coast and West Coast, how is a long-distance manager catching up with the latest demand of local audiences and how is he/she applying his/her experience properly to a whole new place? It might also have something to do with change management: how the staff feel about a new executive director from two thousand miles away and how they would think of the way he/she runs the organization.

 

However, long-distance management also has advantages and it seems that Mr. Weill, the chairman of the Green Music Center is positive and confident about this change. He was not concerned about the potential geographical hurdles and said, “The best managers travel. Music is a global business with people all over the place.“

 

——Su

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College performing arts centers earn high marks for variety

College performing arts centers earn high marks for variety | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
College performing arts centers serve as more than just stage space for school shows. In some cases, they attract big names to these smaller venues, which entice the community with varied shows, plenty of parking and great views of the stage.
MAM Presenting's insight:

This article talked about some interesting features of college performing arts centers. The author pointed out several advantages through the case of College of Lake County's Lumber Center for the Performing Arts. Besides variable ticket prices, free parking and welcome intimate arenas, the author underlined the variety of the performances. “Shows run the gamut from family-friendly acrobatic spectacles to nostalgic rock bands to tribute shows.”

 

Having been a volunteer in my college presenting arts center for four years, I cannot agree more with the opinion that “the acts themselves serve to enrich the cultural offerings on campus and in the surrounding community”. I think the vital atmosphere in college and the variety of performances have an interactive effect on each other: College students are open to different kinds of performances and are more willing to try new things. This might be a big reason that leads to the relatively open and free choices of the presenting arts centers on campus. At the same time, while a variety of performances are brought in college, students are open to even more future options. Another interesting observation from my experience is that artists and arts groups like to add special elements for students in their college performances and this makes the performances in college arts centers more popular. 

 

—Su

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MAM Presenting's comment, November 2, 2013 3:39 PM
I completely agree with this. Although my undergrad did not have such an intense and impressive presenting/performing arts center, we did have outside bands, comedians and speakers come to campus in a similar fashion. Like you said Su regarding "College students [being] open to different kinds of performances and...more willing to try new things," this does enable the venue/school to push the envelope on the types and varieties of acts that they book. However, I wonder what restrictions they have in place when booking such events. How far can they push the envelope in a college setting? Who is to decide - the staff, students…?<br><br>-Dan Gorchynsky
MAMDance's comment, November 7, 2013 2:21 PM
I definitely agree with both Su and Dan on this issue. I also think that having a presenting arts center on a college campus is such an important element of facilitating educational arts experiences for the students as well. In my experience, the majority of companies that travel to perform on a college campus do so with the duel intent of providing an educational experience for the students through a workshop, presentation, or residency. These opportunities are extremely valuable and generally, very appreciated. -Allison
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Kennedy Center Unveils Expansion Plan

Kennedy Center Unveils Expansion Plan | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
The $100 million project adds a rehearsal and education space to Washington’s John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.
MAM Presenting's insight:

This article is a few months old, but is very important to know. This article explains the strategic planning process the Kennedy Center underwent, and is still revisiting, in regard to its new building. 

 

This article explains how the Kennedy Center whittled a $650 million building plan down to $100 million. The construction will officially start in 2016, which is 2-3 years away. The stategic planning process demonstrated in this situation is crucial for young art managers to understand; this contract negociation must comply with the organization, board members, donors, musicians, etc. There are numerous stakeholders. 

 

Over the next years, this will be an interesting project to observe. 

 

-Vann

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MAM_Music's comment, November 4, 2013 11:43 PM
I agree, Vann! It'll be interesting to see how it plays out. I got to attend the staff meeting this summer when David Rubenstein announced it to Kennedy Center staff, and you could already sense some concern from certain staff members. For the most part, I think any organization will garner great support for a project when strong leadership is present. (It also helps when your chairman donates half of the budget to launch the project.) -Kimmy
MAM Presenting's comment, November 6, 2013 1:01 AM
It's interesting to see how the project budget dropped significantly during the decade. I agree that there are so many stakeholders for big organization like the Kennedy Center that more things should be taken into account. I think it's also interesting to see how people think differently in different time. The way of making plans in the boom years could be very different from today. Not only does the time change, but our thinking pattern also changes. ——Su
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Opera alone adds $1.15 billion yearly to US economy

Opera alone adds $1.15 billion yearly to US economy | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
Details of the BEA/NEA report right here.
MAM Presenting's insight:

Aha! Here is the breakdown of that $500 Billion figure, descriped in the previous Scoop.It post.

 

This is the information that the media should be circulating because now it is clear that arts education, performing arts/independent artists, and museums add approximately $170 billion dollars to the GDP.  - Marissa

 

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Dean Mary Schmidt Campbell Looks Beyond the Tisch School

Dean Mary Schmidt Campbell Looks Beyond the Tisch School | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
For Mary Schmidt Campbell, who is retiring as dean of the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, there is plenty of unfinished business in the field of arts education.
MAM Presenting's insight:

This article is about Dr. Campbell, the NYU Arts Dean who is retiring at the end of the academic year, and how her arts education points of views had some influence on the community that she has been engaged in. Many of her ideas corresponded to what we talked about in class and it's especially inspiring to see how arts classes really helped with students' overall school performances.  ——Su

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MAM Theater's comment, December 8, 2013 5:10 PM
It's a shame that arts programs are the first things to be cut in so many schools. But at the same time, when partnerships (like the ones that she has created while at Tisch) bring arts to schools from "high brow" places or people (such as expensive arts institutions), it almost makes sense. That is, underserved schools have wealthier groups come in and expose them to the arts, so the logical connection is to see the arts as something associated with those who are more well-off and therefore cut it, if budgets require drawbacks. I still think such programs are unarguably worth it! But I think it's worth noting that a possibility always exists that these types of programs have the potential to reinforce certain stereotypes. (Jillian)
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The Banff Centre’s ambitious plans for the world stage

The Banff Centre’s ambitious plans for the world stage | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
The strategy to bring the centre’s ‘absolutely extraordinary’ artistic riches to the world stage has a hefty price tag, one organizers hope will be covered by Ottawa, the province and the private sector...
MAM Presenting's insight:

This is an article about how a remote arts and cultural centre is working to expand its audience base and re-establish itself as an innovative leader in the arts world.

 

Most our discussions in class focus on arts organizations in larger cities. The Banff Centre is located outside of the centre of Banff, a mountain town in Alberta, Canada's Rocky Mountains. Banff has a year-round population of just under 8,000 - and while that number swells enormously during the winter months due to the "snow tourism", it must operate in a different fashion than an organization in a city with a population base of a million, 500,000, or even 100,000. 

 

The article includes a discussion of how technology is playing an important role in their efforts.

 

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MAMDance's comment, November 30, 2013 8:12 PM
(Allison) Pretty interesting! Even if they get the funding to build it, can they actually generate enough annual revenue to sustain it? I can't imagine what a building project of this magnitude will do to their annual budget.
MAMDance's comment, December 1, 2013 10:33 PM
Deb: I think this is a really neat idea, but I am incredibly skeptical as to it's feasibility. That is an incredible amount of capital and it is not in a major metropolitan area. It's good that they speak about phases, but I just feel like they are setting themselves up for failure. It could be as simple as the article isn't an in depth article, but I certainly don't want what happened to the August Wilson Center to happen anywhere else.
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Artful.ly Gives Small Arts Organizations a Tech Boost - Digital Music News

Artful.ly Gives Small Arts Organizations a Tech Boost - Digital Music News | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
Now, a solution to an overlooked problem: digital tools for independent arts organizations. Today, non-profit arts service Fractured Atlas has announced their new web-based software system, Artful.ly....
MAM Presenting's insight:


Wasn't aware of this program provided by Fractured Atlas, but for small- to mid- sized arts organizations, why not give this free open-sourced Cloud-based ticketing/CRM a try? Depending on the usability of the program, claims to “give independent artists and small- and mid-size arts organizations the same technology and marketing power as major cultural institutions” may actually be valid.

With all of this technology available, I am left wondering if at some point in the future will there will be so many technologies and systems employed by numerous organizations that coordinating and syncing between the systems may be impossible? The next problem to solve for future generations?


-Dan

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MAM Presenting's comment, November 30, 2013 3:45 PM
For small- to mid-sized arts organizations, an efficient tool could be a huge help. However I agree with Dan's concern on the coordination between too many different technologies and systems in the future. Also, people might need to balance the benefits new tech brings and the intangible costs of personnel training and organizational change. —Su
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“La Belle et la Bête,” Actors and Projections at BAM

“La Belle et la Bête,” Actors and Projections at BAM | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
“La Belle et la Bête,” a retelling of the fairy tale at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, features video projections and dialogue to furrow your brow.
MAM Presenting's insight:

This is a theater review of a 4D version of “Beauty and the Beast” created by a company from Montreal. It is interesting to see technologies be used on stage in this way.

 

I watched a video on their website and it’s quite impressive. It's like watching people act in a 4D film. It seems that the video projection helps a lot in showing the inner activities of the character (for example, the memory of the Beast is projected right beside him), as well as creating a beautiful scene on stage without moving props around.

 

However, while appreciating the visual miracles that the projection creates, I keep thinking about the impact of this application of technology. With so much help of technology, will the theater performance lose some of its core spirit? Does theater play really need these technologies?

 

——Su

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MAM_Music's comment, November 23, 2013 8:52 PM
I've never even heard of a 4D version of a play so I also watched the video. To me, some parts of the video seemed scary and intense because the 4D effects makes it seem like there are ghosts floating in and out of the actors. The effects are interesting and I do agree with Su's comment about if the theater really needs to incorporate these 4D effects because it could distract the audience from really understanding and focusing on the story. -Melody
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How the Arts Can Prosper Through Strategic Collaborations

MAM Presenting's insight:

Collaborating is the key stratgy for the survival of arts organizations. Presenting organzations have an advantage in strategic collaboration due to the amount of contacts and various arts networks each organization has acquired (due to the nature of the presenting business).  

 

Presenting organizations should take advantage of this. Setting mutual goals with local organizations "can help expand the customer base, develop new sources of funding, and cut costs without compromising any organization’s mission or quality." The article speaks about how local art organizations collaborated together in Philadelphia to bring a subscription series avaliable across three different genres of music. This is the future of our arts.

--Vann

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MAM_Music's comment, November 18, 2013 8:12 PM
Katie: What's fascinating about this article is that despite being from 1996, it speaks to trends and challenges we're still dealing with today. This could highlight how slowly the nonprofit art sector has been to react, or how difficult the barriers to collaboration, audience development, and fiscal stability are to overcome. Either way it's a bit staggering to see how clearly laid out the problems we continue to struggle with are laid out here.
MAM Theater's comment, November 18, 2013 10:43 PM
Katie, that is such a great point. I completely overlooked the date at first read, just because of how accurate it portrayed the current situation. Somewhat frightening and extremely fascinating! (Seth)
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Sony Centre and St. Lawrence Centre should merge and soon | Toronto Star

Sony Centre and St. Lawrence Centre should merge and soon | Toronto Star | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
Mergers could lead to survival of Toronto’s strapped arts players, even the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and Massey and Roy Thomson halls
MAM Presenting's insight:

This article presents an interesting perspective on how mergers can help struggling arts organizations. While it focuses on performing arts organizations in Toronto (both presenting and producing), the principles are applicable to any organizations in any community. However, I take issue with Knelman’s statement that “when you look over the landscape of our major arts organizations, it seems clear that merger is the magic answer not just for civic-owned theatres but for several top arts groups facing scary financial challenges over the next few years.” I think it is incredibly dangerous to call anything a “magic answer” to the issues occurring in small and large arts organizations across North America. I agree with the author that mergers may provide a unique solution to certain struggling arts organizations in the same city that have complimentary missions. However, mergers are not blanket solution that will be successful for all organizations, and too many mergers may, in fact, create an entirely new set of issues for arts organizations. - Marissa

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MAM Theater's curator insight, November 17, 2013 9:20 PM

Ying: It’s eye-opening to see that a merger can save a financially challenged large-size presenting organization. The business model to reside under the umbrella of an organization that runs buildings seems to provide an asylum for those suffering organizations, however, from my perspective, this model challenges the management level to a greater extent. It requires the CEO to be a master of both running a resident company and running a building, and keeping the whole organization in order. As to the merger of some departments, let’s say Marketing, it requires more flexibility within the department in order to represent 2 organizations. The job designation should be clarified so that each team member knows what he/she is responsible for. 

MAM Presenting's comment, November 17, 2013 11:54 PM
I believe that as the arts market is becoming over saturated, merging would be an option for arts organizations to survive. It could be mutually beneficial to share resources. However I agree with the scooper's (didn't see the name:D) opinion that it is over optimistic to define merging as a "magic answer". Merging can bring in more problems due to the differences in missions, visions, operating models of both parties. ——Su
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Could it be that some art institutions deserve to fail? @TerryTeachout discusses

Could it be that some art institutions deserve to fail? @TerryTeachout discusses | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
High-culture attendance numbers have been shrinking for more than a decade. Even the New York City Opera wasn't too big to fail. But here's a thought: Could it be that some of these institutions should disappear?
MAM Presenting's insight:

Although the title does not sound that pleasant, this article gives us some interesting insights about how an arts organization should adapt to the “brutal challenges of American culture in the 21st century”.

 

While people keep emphasizing the objective challenges that arts organizations are facing with, such as the insufficiency of funding, shrinking audiences and media technology, the author underlined the importance for the organization itself to make radical innovation that is “necessary to survive in a world of ceaseless competition”.

 

This challenge goes back to arts managers. There is so much to be considered in terms of changes: mission re-examination, new funding plan, new marketing campaigns and so on. Neither a success nor a failure should be taken for granted. “No arts organization is too big, too old or too famous to fail.” It’s all about innovating with the time.

 

——Su

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MAMDance's comment, November 14, 2013 8:47 AM
It is often hard to hear reality sometimes, when that reality may not mean the survival of your organization; but as more arts organizations close the doors permanently, it is a conversation that needs to happen. Funding streams are shrinking and over-saturation is prevalent in many areas. This article is definitely worth a read!
MAMDance's comment, November 14, 2013 8:48 AM
Don't press Enter to go down to the next line...Deb
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Stratford Festival to film productions for worldwide theatre distribution

Stratford Festival to film productions for worldwide theatre distribution | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
Artistic director Antoni Cimolino’s long-term goal is even more ambitious: To create a DVD library of Canadian productions of all of William Shakespeare’s plays that can be used in schools across the country...

Via MAM Theater
MAM Presenting's insight:

As more organizations utilize digital distribution strategies to access audiences, this technology has the potential to vastly change the ecosystem of the performing arts. - Marissa

 

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MAM Theater's curator insight, November 8, 2013 10:40 PM

WEI: Interesting article! Stradford’s plan of recording Shakespeare productions for distribution in movie theatres in Canada, the United States and around the world leads me to question if theatre on video would partially replace live-performance touring in the future? For one thing, instead of touring with real artists and equipment, touring with records obviously saves theaters a large amount of money and energy. For another, from the comments, it seems the audience is expecting this trend because they can save ticketing expenditures to enjoy a high quality show.

 

However, I would argue that a recorded performance could never match up to the live experience of watching a play, and live performance touring will live because of its indispensible value for arts communities. I believe most of us have the same opinion. How could we do justice to a performance and actors by video recording? In my view, no two live performances can ever be the same and it always feels like a compromise for the audience to understand a play without access to artists’ intangible forces on the stage. Unfortunately, a majority of audience doesn’t realize it and think the prices are always too high.  The cruel reality is that “where’s the audience, where’s the business”, if we want to win our audience back from the new-technology world, I believe we need to figure out some ways to help the audience understand the fundamental values of a live performance to together preserve it. 

MAM Theater's comment, November 10, 2013 11:49 PM
It reminds me of other news related to digital distribution of live performances recently happening around the world. After Lincoln Center, Met Opera and several other prestigious organizations have moved forward with this marketing strategy, more and more organizations are catching up with the intention to engage more audience (including potential audience) and increase revenue. However, digitalization of live performance is not cheap at all. Rental or purchase of new equipment and satellite services can be exorbitant and risky. So decision makers of arts organizations should carefully weigh the cost (also opportunity cost of investing more in actual programming) against the benefit of this content digitization and figure out if this is the suitable strategy for the organization at this moment. (Ying)
MAM Presenting's comment, November 11, 2013 11:01 PM
As more and more major organizations look to digital distribution strategies as a means of accessing new audiences nationally and internationally, how will this affect the relationship between performing arts organizations? As the technology is extremely expensive to facilitate such an undertaking, this may spur the partnership of small/medium organizations with large organizations who can afford the technology. - Marissa
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2. Building an Organizational Culture - APAP Leadership Development Institute

2. Building an Organizational Culture - APAP Leadership Development Institute | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
The tools on this page can be helpful for starting or deepening an organizational culture for engaging community and moving toward action.
MAM Presenting's insight:

This is a helpful article for an aspiring arts presenter to know. This section dicusses the need to develop not only a culture in your community of a unique spirit and identity, but also creating a similar unique community culture within the organization. 

 

This is also transferrable to any organization or business. By doing so, the staff will hold similar values and understand a new aspect to the mission that may or may not have been know before. 

 

--Vann

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Made in Scotland and celebrated worldwide – a new model for exporting theatre and dance is thriving :: Arts Management Network :: The Network for Arts Administrators and Experts in the Creative Ind...

Made in Scotland and celebrated worldwide – a new model for exporting theatre and dance is thriving :: Arts Management Network :: The Network for Arts Administrators and Experts in the Creative Ind... | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
The Network for Arts Administrators and Experts in the Creative Industries
MAM Presenting's insight:

The Made in Scotland program is perfectly summed up as such: "A neat solution to twin problems at the [Edinburgh Festival] Fringe. It allows international bookers to find quality touring material in the sprawling event, while it gives Scottish theatre and dance companies a place to be seen."

 

In what I see as a presenting organization "mini-entity," what the Made in Scotland program, and essentially the Edinburgh Festival Fringe are doing (shout out to all those who attended the Festival and Event Management seminar), is a great collaborative feat, yet a HUGE amount of work.


What I think definitely helps in making this festival that "springboard" and "one stop shop" for the artists and presenters is the fact that they have so many contacts in the industry and are have a good running history about them.

 

I am left wondering though, are there ever any issues regarding who gets to "claim" certain performances/artists should they continue on and become successful. Anything built into contracts? All goodwill? 

 

-Dan Gorchynsky

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MAM Theater's comment, November 10, 2013 6:11 PM
An interesting question, Dan! I was curious about this so I did a little digging. If you look at the terms and conditions of the funding (http://www.creativescotland.com/funding/after-you-receive-funding) you'll notice that it specifies that Creative Scotland has the right to enter into negotiations with the artist, to receive 'appropriate recoupment of the funding', if the artist exploits their work for financial gain. Other than this, however, it doesn't look like there are specifications regarding who has the right to the work/artist. It seems to me that that leaves the door open for a great many legal battles, since I wouldn't assume that goodwill counts for much (without trying to sound too pessimistic). -Jillian
MAM Presenting's comment, November 10, 2013 10:20 PM
The idea of Made in Scotland program is really interesting! International arts festivals, which usually does arts importing, are not rare nowadays, but the idea of exporting outstanding arts work and making it as a program is new to me. This could be an interesting inspiration for international touring companies and arts groups who want their work to be seen worldwide. ——Su
MAM Presenting's comment, November 11, 2013 11:18 PM
This is a really interesting concept - it provides a framework that could be useful for festivals and organizations around the world! - Marissa
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New Space for the Future of Arts?

New Space for the Future of Arts? | Presenting Organizations | Scoop.it
The Indian sculpter Anish Kapoor and the Japanese architect Arata Isozaki could have put up a tent for a series of concerts to help areas of Japan devastated by a tsunami. Instead they built a giant purple blimp.
MAM Presenting's insight:

A purple inflatable concert hall? That's what is new in Japan. 

 

I came across this article randomly, but think we could discuss this further. Although this portable, inflatable concert hall doesn't sound as pristine as Carnegie Hall does, could this lure in a new audience that the arts hasn't seen before? Could the excitement of going to hear a symphony become "hip" and "fun" again? Could organizations begin creating portable, fun stages such as this Japanese one to captivate new audiences in dance, music, theatre, etc.? 

 

I think presenting organizations should dabble in this idea. Yes, it's a little strange and unconventional, but perhaps it could be an outreach or development technique to cultivate new patrons and donors. 

 

--Vann

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MAM_Music's comment, November 4, 2013 8:48 PM
Katie: Did you see the pictures of the inside? Beautiful! http://blogs.wsj.com/scene/2013/10/10/giant-eggplant-brings-music-hope-to-tsunami-affected-japan/
MAM Presenting's comment, November 11, 2013 11:24 PM
Thanks for posting those pictures Katie (and Vann for originally posting the article) - that is absolutely incredible inside. It is a work of art unto itself that could only enhance the experience of another art form occurring within its confines. - Marissa
MAMDance's comment, November 18, 2013 12:29 PM
I spoke about this in AMTLab a couple of weeks ago! I think it is such an incredible idea and completely tied to rebuilding the communities that it visits! -Deb