prehistoric plants
81 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Smith
Scoop.it!

Using different scents to attract or repel insects - Phys.org

Using different scents to attract or repel insects - Phys.org | prehistoric plants | Scoop.it
That's why flowering plants face a dilemma: should they use their resources to attract pollinating insects and, by extension, for reproduction or should they invest in defence against herbivores? A Swiss-Italian research team ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Smith
Scoop.it!

Bionic Plants Offer Superpowered Photosynthesis - Scientific ...

"Plants have, for a long time, provided us with valuable products like food, biofuels, construction materials and the oxygen we breathe," notes plant biologist turned chemical engineer Juan Pablo Giraldo, a postdoctoral fellow in the research lab...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Smith
Scoop.it!

21st Century Bionic Plants Might Even Monitor For Environmental ...

The researchers then turned to living plants and used a technique called vascular infusion to deliver nanoparticles into Arabidopsis thaliana, a small flowering plant. Using this method, the researchers applied a solution of ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Smith
Scoop.it!

Herbs of Utnapisjtim: Plantago Major, page 1 - Above Top Secret

Herbs of Utnapisjtim: Plantago Major, page 1 - Above Top Secret | prehistoric plants | Scoop.it
In Norway we call this plant 'Groblad' as in 'Grow-leaves' and has earned a near magical reputation for healing wounds. Infact, I have yet to find any remedy in nature or in modern medicine alike with matching effect.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Smith
Scoop.it!

Silurian Period Facts: Climate, Animals & Plants - LiveScience.com

Silurian Period Facts: Climate, Animals & Plants - LiveScience.com | prehistoric plants | Scoop.it
LiveScience.com
Silurian Period Facts: Climate, Animals & Plants
LiveScience.com
[Related: Fossil Fish is Oldest Creature With a Face]. Eurypterids were the apex predators of the Silurian oceans.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Smith
Scoop.it!

The Water Lily in Bloom Time Lapse

Nymphaeaceae /ˌnɪmfiːˈeɪsiː/ is a family of flowering plants. Members of this family are commonly called water lilies and live as rhizomatous aquatic herbs i...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Smith
Scoop.it!

Pine Trees Natures Beauty Of Hills & Mountains Of Lava

Pines are conifer trees in the genus Pinus /ˈpiːnuːs/ in the family Pinaceae. They are the only genus in the subfamily Pinoideae. Although some authorities c...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Smith
Scoop.it!

Antarctic Moss - Scientific American

To test whether the Antarctic moss would regrow, the researchers punched into the permanently frozen soil beneath the living moss, removing cores that contained frozen soil, ice and plants. To prevent contamination, they quickly wrapped ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Smith
Scoop.it!

YardMD: Peonies not as difficult to grow as you might think - Stevenspointjournal

YardMD: Peonies not as difficult to grow as you might think
Stevenspointjournal
Modern varieties of peonies, proven hardy in our climate, are among the longest-lived and easiest to grow of all garden plants.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Smith
Scoop.it!

Stromatolites a window into Earth's history - Bonners Ferry Herald

Stromatolites a window into Earth's history - Bonners Ferry Herald | prehistoric plants | Scoop.it
Stromatolites a window into Earth's history
Bonners Ferry Herald
Some fossils resemble modern-day counterparts, such as ferns and petrified wood, and others have living examples, such as stromatolites.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Smith
Scoop.it!

Keeping Plants in the Dark Blinds Evolutionists

Evolutionists, you are traveling through another dimension, a dimension not only of sight and sound but of mind. A journey into a wondrous land of imaginatio...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Smith from Phytophthora biology
Scoop.it!

Sudden Oak Death plagues local groves

Sudden Oak Death plagues local groves | prehistoric plants | Scoop.it

So far, the organism that causes sudden oak death (SOD) inhabits only about 15 percent of available oak forests, but the problem will likely get worse. People visiting infested areas should not remove leaves or branches, and should clean the dirt from their shoes before leaving, to prevent spreading the pathogen. Oak populations do not have much natural resistance to the disease, and once it arrives in a forest, no one knows how to eradicate it.


Via Niklaus Grunwald
more...
No comment yet.