Prehistoric Archa...
Follow
Find
2.3K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Maria João Valente
onto Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution
Scoop.it!

The Basques are genetically distinctive | Gene Expression | Discover Magazine

The Basques are genetically distinctive | Gene Expression | Discover Magazine | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it
Human Genetics | Basques | The Basque people of northern Spain loom large in any attempt to understand the ethnogenesis of European populations.
more...
No comment yet.
Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution
Data on prehistory, human evolution and their archaeology
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

The Basques are genetically distinctive | Gene Expression | Discover Magazine

The Basques are genetically distinctive | Gene Expression | Discover Magazine | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it
Human Genetics | Basques | The Basque people of northern Spain loom large in any attempt to understand the ethnogenesis of European populations.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

New Early Warning System Spotlights Endangered Archaeological and Cultural Heritage Sites | Popular Archaeology - exploring the past

New Early Warning System Spotlights Endangered Archaeological and Cultural Heritage Sites | Popular Archaeology - exploring the past | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it
Popular Archaeology Online archaeology magazine.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Shared genes with Neanderthal relatives: Modern East Asians share genetic material with prehistoric Denisovans

Shared genes with Neanderthal relatives: Modern East Asians share genetic material with prehistoric Denisovans | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it
During human evolution our ancestors mated with Neanderthals, but also with other related hominids.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Irony: small mouth may be product of soft, supersized meals

Irony: small mouth may be product of soft, supersized meals | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it
Agriculturalists have shorter jawbones than hunter-gatherers because their food is softer and requires less chewing, a development that may drive today's trips to the orthodontist.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Archaeologists land world's oldest fish hook : Nature News & Comment

Archaeologists land world's oldest fish hook : Nature News & Comment | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

The world's oldest fish hook has been unearthed at a site in East Timor, alongside evidence that modern humans were catching fish from the open ocean as far back as 42,000 years ago. (...)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

When Humans First Plied the Deep Blue Sea - ScienceNOW

When Humans First Plied the Deep Blue Sea - ScienceNOW | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

In a shallow cave on an island north of Australia, researchers have made a surprising discovery: the 42,000-year-old bones of tuna and sharks that were clearly brought there by human hands. The find, reported online today in Science, provides the strongest evidence yet that people were deep-sea fishing so long ago. And those maritime skills may have allowed the inhabitants of this region to colonize lands far and wide. (...)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Modern Humans Wandered Out of Africa via Arabia - National Geographic

Modern Humans Wandered Out of Africa via Arabia - National Geographic | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it
National GeographicModern Humans Wandered Out of Africa via ArabiaNational GeographicModern humans migrated out of Africa via a southern route through Arabia, rather than a northern route by way of Egypt, according to research announced at a...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

New technologies challenge old ideas about early hominid diets

New technologies challenge old ideas about early hominid diets | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

New assessments by researchers using the latest high-tech tools to study the diets of early hominids are challenging long-held assumptions about what our ancestors ate.

By analyzing microscopic pits and scratches on hominid teeth, as well as stable isotopes of carbon found in teeth, researchers are getting a very different picture of the diet habitats of early hominids than that painted by the physical structure of the skull, jawbones and teeth. While some early hominids sported powerful jaws and large molars -- including Paranthropus boisei, dubbed "Nutcracker Man" -- they may have cracked nuts rarely if at all, said CU-Boulder anthropology Professor Matt Sponheimer, study co-author.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Jawbone found in England is from the earliest known modern human in northwestern Europe

A piece of jawbone excavated from a prehistoric cave in England is the earliest evidence for modern humans in Europe, according to an international team of scientists. The bone first was believed to be about 35,000 years old, but the new research study shows it to be significantly older -- between 41,000 and 44,000 years old, according to the findings that will be published in the journal Nature. The new dating of the bone is expected to help scientists pin down how quickly the modern humans spread across Europe during the last Ice Age. It also helps confirm the much-debated theory that early humans coexisted with Neanderthals.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Arqueólogos em busca da origem da Estela do Guerreiro encontram ponta de lança

Arqueólogos em busca da origem da Estela do Guerreiro encontram ponta de lança | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it
Os arqueólogos (re)encontraram o local onde, em 1972, foi descoberta a chamada «Estela do Guerreiro», uma das mais emblemáticas pedras epigrafadas com a escrita do Sudoeste.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Aboriginal Australians: The first explorers

Aboriginal Australians: The first explorers | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

"Researchers have, for the first time, pieced together the human genome from an Aboriginal Australian. The results re-interpret the prehistory of our species."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Finding clues as to how early man adapted to marine environments

Finding clues as to how early man adapted to marine environments | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

"Norway's rugged coast has perhaps no better analogue than the glacially scoured shoreline of Patagonia, 13,000 kilometres away and a hemisphere apart. The two countries' similarities, isolated from each other, make them perfect natural laboratories for archaeologists interested in how early man lived in and adapted to marine environments."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Continents influenced ancient human migration, spread of technology

Continents influenced ancient human migration, spread of technology | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

"Researchers at Brown University and Stanford University have pieced together ancient human migration in North and South America. Writing in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, the authors find that technology spread more slowly in the Americas than in Eurasia. Population groups in the Americas have less frequent exchanges than groups that fanned out over Europe and Asia."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Amazing photos of Kanzi the bonobo lighting a fire and cooking a meal - Telegraph

Amazing photos of Kanzi the bonobo lighting a fire and cooking a meal - Telegraph | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

Extraordinary photos (11) show a bonobo - also known as a pygmy chimpanzee - named Kanzi collecting wood, breaking it up and putting it into a pile before striking a match to light the fire, and then cooking his meal on the fire.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Trail of 'stone breadcrumbs' reveals the identity of one of the first human groups to leave Africa

Trail of 'stone breadcrumbs' reveals the identity of one of the first human groups to leave Africa | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

A series of new archaeological discoveries in the Sultanate of Oman, nestled in the southeastern corner of the Arabian Peninsula, reveals the timing and identity of one of the first modern human groups to migrate out of Africa, (...)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Ice Age paintings from the Swabian Jura, Southwestern Germany document the earliest painting tradition in Central Europe

Ice Age paintings from the Swabian Jura, Southwestern Germany document the earliest painting tradition in Central Europe | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it
Recent excavations conducted by the University of Tübingen at Hohle Fels Cave in the Swabian Jura of southwestern Germany have produced new evidence for the earliest painting tradition in Central Europe about 15,000 years ago.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Last big chill suggests lower climate impact of carbon

Last big chill suggests lower climate impact of carbon | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it
Researchers use the conditions that prevailed during the peak of the last glaciation to estimate how our climate will respond to changes in carbon dioxide.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Prehistoric Painters Planned Ahead - ScienceNOW

Prehistoric Painters Planned Ahead - ScienceNOW | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

(...)

A new discovery in South Africa suggests that prehistoric human painters also planned ahead, using ochre paint kits as early as 100,000 years ago. But just what they used the paints for is still a matter of debate.

Red or yellow ochre, an iron-containing pigment found in some clays, is ubiquitous at early modern human sites in Africa and the Near East. Some researchers think the earliest known art comes from the site of Blombos in South Africa, about 300 kilometers east of Cape Town, where pieces of ochre incised with an abstract design have been dated to 77,000 years old.

(...)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Artificial intelligence finds fossil sites : Nature News

Artificial intelligence finds fossil sites : Nature News | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

Palaeontologists use computer neural network and satellite images to work out where to dig. (...) artificial intelligence now promises to assist, after a team trained a computer neural network to recognize fossil sites in satellite images.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

100,000-year-old ochre toolkit and workshop discovered in South Africa

100,000-year-old ochre toolkit and workshop discovered in South Africa | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

An ochre-rich mixture, possibly used for decoration, painting and skin protection 100,000 years ago, and stored in two abalone shells, was discovered at Blombos Cave in Cape Town, South Africa.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Archaeologists find blade 'production lines' existed as much as 400,000 years ago

Archaeologists find blade 'production lines' existed as much as 400,000 years ago | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

Archaeology has long associated advanced blade production with the Upper Palaeolithic period, about 30,000-40,000 years ago, linked with the emergence of Homo Sapiens and cultural features such as cave art. Now researchers at Tel Aviv University have uncovered evidence which shows that "modern" blade production was also an element of Amudian industry during the late Lower Paleolithic period, 200,000-400,000 years ago as part of the Acheulo-Yabrudian cultural complex, a geographically limited group of hominins who lived in modern-day Israel, Lebanon, Syria and Jordan.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

New evidence for the earliest modern humans in Europe

New evidence for the earliest modern humans in Europe | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

The timing, process and archaeology of the peopling of Europe by early modern humans have been actively debated for more than a century. Reassessment of the anatomy and dating of a fragmentary upper jaw with three teeth from Kent's Cavern, Devon, in southern England has shed new light on these issues.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Climatic fluctuations drove key events in human evolution

Climatic fluctuations drove key events in human evolution | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it
Researchers have found that periods of rapid fluctuation in temperature coincided with the emergence of the first distant relatives of human beings and the appearance and spread of stone tools.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Scientists sequence genome of man who was Aboriginal Australian

Scientists sequence genome of man who was Aboriginal Australian | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

"An international team of researchers (...) has for the first time sequenced the genome of a man who was an Aboriginal Australian. They have shown that modern day Aboriginal Australians are the direct descendents of the first people who arrived on the continent some 50,000 years ago and that those ancestors left Africa earlier than their European and Asian counterparts."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maria João Valente
Scoop.it!

Denisovan DNA in the islands, and an Australian genome | john hawks weblog

Denisovan DNA in the islands, and an Australian genome | john hawks weblog | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

"The hypothesis of a single out-of-Africa dispersal is rejected by new data about Denisovan mixture and whole-genome sequencing of an Aboriginal Australian."

more...
No comment yet.