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Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution
Data on prehistory, human evolution and their archaeology
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Jawbone found in England is from the earliest known modern human in northwestern Europe

A piece of jawbone excavated from a prehistoric cave in England is the earliest evidence for modern humans in Europe, according to an international team of scientists. The bone first was believed to be about 35,000 years old, but the new research study shows it to be significantly older -- between 41,000 and 44,000 years old, according to the findings that will be published in the journal Nature. The new dating of the bone is expected to help scientists pin down how quickly the modern humans spread across Europe during the last Ice Age. It also helps confirm the much-debated theory that early humans coexisted with Neanderthals.

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Earliest Europeans Were Cannibals, Wore Bling : Discovery News

Earliest Europeans Were Cannibals, Wore Bling : Discovery News | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it
"Early humans wore jewelry and likely practiced cannibalism, suggest remains of the earliest knownHomo sapiens[/i] from southeastern Europe.
The remains, described in PLoS One[/i], date to 32,000 years ago and represent the oldest direct evidence for anatomically modern humans in a well-documented context. The human remains are also the oldest known for our species in Europe to show post-mortem cut marks."
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Brooks Bonham's curator insight, February 21, 1:20 AM

This article explains how the earliest modern humans from southeastern europe show artifacts of cannibalism taking place 32,000 years ago.

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New evidence for the earliest modern humans in Europe

New evidence for the earliest modern humans in Europe | Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution | Scoop.it

The timing, process and archaeology of the peopling of Europe by early modern humans have been actively debated for more than a century. Reassessment of the anatomy and dating of a fragmentary upper jaw with three teeth from Kent's Cavern, Devon, in southern England has shed new light on these issues.

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