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Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond
Pre-modern for Africa, North Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond
Curated by diana buja
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Co-evolution of Farming and Private Property during the Early Holocene - Supplementary Info.

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Here is the attachment to the paper that I've just put up.

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Innovative grassland management systems for environmental and livelihood benefits

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"Le sacrifice humain en Égypte ancienne et ailleurs", ouvrage collectif

"Le sacrifice humain en Égypte ancienne et ailleurs", ouvrage collectif | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

Via Egypt-actus
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Egypt-actus's curator insight, May 3, 2013 12:15 PM

Présentation de l'éditeur :

Symbole de barbarie, le sacrifice humain a longtemps servi à stigmatiser la prétendue inhumanité des peuples non civilisés. Contrairement aux clichés, le sacrifice semble aller de pair avec l’émergence de la civilisation, comme en Égypte et en Mésopotamie, où il constituerait une forme de manifestation suprême du pouvoir royal émergent. Il est aussi un fait de civilisation dans le monde aztèque, dans le cadre d’une dramatique théâtralité du pouvoir à travers laquelle il doit impérativement se donner à voir. Inversement, le sacrifice n’est pas là où l’on a souvent cru le débusquer : dans les civilisations des steppes d’Asie centrale, dans le Soudan de Méroé ou en Gaule, le terme de « sacrifice » a été hâtivement appliqué à des pratiques qui sont en fait celles du cortège des « morts d’accompagnement » ou des cohortes de vaincus massacrés.

C’est à la variété et à la complexité du phénomène que s’attache le présent volume, mise en commun des recherches d’une vingtaine d’anthropologues, d’historiens et d’archéologues, à l’échelle de la planète et des millénaires.

Editions Soleb, 2013

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Three Rulers in Nubia and the Early Middle Kingdom in Egypt

Three Rulers in Nubia and the Early Middle Kingdom in Egypt | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

Recalling the Eleventh Dynasty, the three rulers in
Lower Nubia were a clear threat to the security of
the Twelfth Dynasty Egyptian state. The policy of 

recruiting foreign soldiers backfired when they could
go home with full knowledge of Egypt and its capabilities..


Via Dorian Q Fuller
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Dorian Q Fuller's insight:

A reconsideration of the "lost kings" of Nubia, Qakareiny, Gereg-tawy-fy, and Wadj-ka-Re Segersenti. Williams argues that the most likely scenario is that date to the late 11th dynasty period in Egypt but represent a local 'rebel' Kingdom, probably based at Areika.

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Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, March 22, 2013 9:16 PM

A reconsideration of the "lost kings" of Nubia, Qakareiny, Gereg-tawy-fy, and Wadj-ka-Re Segersenti. Williams argues that the most likely scenario is that date to the late 11th dynasty period in Egypt but represent a local 'rebel' Kingdom, probably based at Areika.

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Burundi set to embrace hybrid maize seeds - SciDev.Net

Burundi set to embrace hybrid maize seeds - SciDev.Net | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
Food security in Burundi could be improved by new hybrid maize seeds, but only if the seeds are affordable to farmers, say researchers.

Via Bioversity Library
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Burundian scientists at both ISABU (nat.res.inst.) and local FAO are involved. 

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diana buja's curator insight, April 24, 2013 10:25 AM
Burundian scientists at both ISABU (nat.res.inst.) and local FAO are involved.
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Quiz on Identifying Ancient Egyptian Plants

Quiz on Identifying Ancient Egyptian Plants | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
Below are results, to date, of the quiz: Can You Identify These Plants from Ancient Egypt? I have entered the suggestions that have been sent in, together with a small picture of each one.  For lar...
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Don’t be shy!  Send in your recommendations (names will be withheld – unless you specifically say that you want to be identified)!  I will give you all a few more days in which to ponder …

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Arabian Archaeology and Epigraphy - Volume 24, Issue 1 - The Neolithic of Arabia – New Paradigms and Future Perspectives -special issue

Arabian Archaeology and Epigraphy - Volume 24, Issue 1 - The Neolithic of Arabia – New Paradigms and Future Perspectives -special issue | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

Towards new paradigms: multiple pathways for the Arabian Neolithic

The shell middens of Las Bela coast and the Indus delta (Arabian Sea, Pakistan) (pages 9–14)

Thoughts on nomadism in Middle Holocene Oman (pages 15–27)

Back to Fasad… and the PPNB controversy. Questioning a Levantine origin for Arabian Early Holocene projectile points technology (pages 28–36)

Considering marine transgression as a mechanism for enforced migration and the littoral Gulf ʿUbaid phenomenon (pages 37–43)

Neolithic settlement of the eastern Yemen Plateau: an exploration of locational choice and land use (pages 44–50)

Khamseen rock shelter and the Late Palaeolithic-Neolithic transition in Dhofar (pages 51–58)

Considering the Arabian Neolithic through a reconstitution of interregional obsidian distribution patterns in the region (pages 59–67)

The Neolithic in Arabia: a view from the south (pages 68–72)

Neolithic material cultures of Oman and the Gulf seashores from 5500–4500 BCE (pages 73–78)

Soft hammerstone percussion use in bidirectional blade-tool production at Acila 36 and in bifacial knapping at Shagra (Qatar)

Understanding the evolution of the Holocene Pluvial Phase and its impact on Neolithic populations in south-east Arabia (pages 87–94)

Tabula rasa or refugia? Using genetic data to assess the peopling of Arabia (pages 95–101)

The Neolithic period in the Central Region of the Emirate of Sharjah (UAE) (pages 102–108)

Hailat Araka and the South Arabian Neolithic (pages 109–117)

 


Via Dorian Q Fuller
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Dorian Q Fuller's insight:

A special issue on Neolithic arabia. not a lot of archaeobotany, but important evidence on the trajectory in the region that focused first on domesticated fauna, more specialized pastoralism and then much later crop cultivation (based on Near Eastern crops). The general trajectory with late sedentism and crops parallels that of the West African sahel and south India.

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Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, April 23, 2013 1:06 PM

A special issue on Neolithic arabia. not a lot of archaeobotany, but important evidence on the trajectory in the region that focused first on domesticated fauna, more specialized pastoralism and then much later crop cultivation (based on Near Eastern crops). The general trajectory with late sedentism and crops parallels that of the West African sahel and south India.

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Revue "Ancient Egypt", avril-mai 2013

Revue "Ancient Egypt", avril-mai 2013 | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

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No room for archaeology archive in 27% of museums

No room for archaeology archive in 27% of museums | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

A survey by the Society of Museum Archaeologists (SMA) has exposed a lack of storage space and curatorial expertise in English museums dealing with archaeological archives.

The survey of 134 museums found that 36 could not accept archaeological archives because of lack of space.

It also revealed that museums in 47 local authorities were no longer collecting, while 70% of museums had no specialist archaeology curator.

SMA chairwoman Gail Boyle said: “Many of the museums that responded are local authority museums that have no statutory funding, so they are often targeted [for cuts]. It has become prevalent over time and is getting worse.

“Archaeological field units are having to store their work, as there is nowhere for them to deposit it.


Via David Connolly
diana buja's insight:

Without the archives, what value are the 'finds' to which they are linked?  Very sad.

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David Connolly's curator insight, March 2, 2013 1:48 AM

Oh dear oh dear

Laura Brown's comment, March 2, 2013 5:26 PM
Sad, but not a surprise. I've watched 'Museum Secrets' and see them pull stuff out of storage bins and talk about things found, again.
Ancient World Apps's curator insight, March 5, 2013 11:33 AM

More depressing news :(

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The Progression of the Fork: From Diabolical to Divine

The Progression of the Fork: From Diabolical to Divine | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
This paper is about 'Design and the Tools of the Table, 1500–2005' curated as part of the Cooper Hewitt exhibit on utensils.
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Did overhunting lead to domestication? : Past Horizons Archaeology

Did overhunting lead to domestication? : Past Horizons Archaeology | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

A new study on the populations of wild cattle and boars in the Levant Valley by Nimrod Marom, Guy Bar-OzLaboratory of Archaeozoology, University of Haifa, Israel has been published in PLOSone online Journal. The research helps reshape our present understanding on the beginning of agriculture and domestication of animals.

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More tourist attractions open at Salaheddin Citadel - Museums - Heritage - Ahram Online

More tourist attractions open at Salaheddin Citadel - Museums - Heritage - Ahram Online | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
More,tourist,attractions,open,at,Salaheddin,Citadel,-,Museums,-,Heritage
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2 museums, a war museum going back to pharaonic times and a museum of carriages and related.

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So was Richard III evil or not?

So was Richard III evil or not? | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
We're led to believe now that the Middle Ages ended in a car park in Leicester. OK, the car park wasn't there in 1485 when the area witnessed the violent Battle of Bosworth. This was where the reig...
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Co-evolution of Farming & Private Property during the Early Holocene

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Just out, and I'm still reviewing.  Also there's a separate annex and I'll put up the link for that, as well.

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Le maquillage dans l'Egypte ancienne

Le maquillage dans l'Egypte ancienne | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

 

 

 

Un bref article en anglais.

http://www.mysteriesofancientegypt.com/2013/05/makeup-in-ancient-egypt.html

 

En complément, un doc PDF : http://www.windblower.dk/images/blogimages/makeup-in-ancient-egypt.pdf


Via Egypt-actus
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Tree-Felling, Woodworking, and Changing Perceptions of the Landscape during the Neolithic and Chalcolithic Periods in the Southern Levant

Tree-Felling, Woodworking, and Changing Perceptions of the Landscape during the Neolithic and Chalcolithic Periods in the Southern Levant | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

Examination of 206 Neolithic and Chalcolithic bifaces from the southern Levant revealed that changes in form during the emergence of agropastoralism correlated with evolving land use practices, but new biface types also expressed altered social identities and perceptions of the environment. Nonfunctional groundstone pre-pottery Neolithic A (PPNA) bifaces seem to have served as social and status symbols, while flaked flint PPNA tranchet axes and chisels were used for carpentry rather than tree-felling. This pattern continued during the following early pre-pottery Neolithic B (EPPNB) period, but a new sharpening method, polishing, was used on a unique flint tranchet ax to strengthen its edge. By the MPPNB and LPPNB, heavier polished flint axes were used to clear forests for fields, grazing lands, wood fuel, and lumber. Sustainable forest management continued until the cumulative effects of tree-felling may have led to landscape degradation at the end of the PPNC. Adzes replace axes as heavy woodworking tools during the pottery Neolithic A (PNA) period, but by the PNB period, once again there are more carpentry tools than tree-felling bifaces. The trend is reversed again during the Chalcolithic, when the demand for fire wood, lumber, and cleared land seems to have increased during a time of emerging socioeconomic complexity.


Via Dorian Q Fuller
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Dorian Q Fuller's comment, April 24, 2013 11:52 AM
Nice study of changing axes and axe use (from microwear) showing that tree-felling rises in the later PPNB. A nice correlation with when crops are fully domesticated, the crop package has become more complete and when, therefore we can really think in terms of agriculture, some 2000 years or more after the start of early cutlivation. (On the cultivation side of things, see the discussion by Asout & Fuller in Vegetation history and Archaeobotany last year: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00334-011-0332-0
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Archaeologists Say the ‘Anthropocene’ Is Here—But It Began Long Ago

Archaeologists Say the ‘Anthropocene’ Is Here—But It Began Long Ago | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

A vocal group of geologists and other scientists are pushing to define a new geological epoch, marked by climatic and environmental change caused by humans. At the Society for American Archaeology meetings in Honolulu, archaeologists argued that it's high time for their field, which studies humans and their activities over geological time, to have a greater voice in the debate. The archaeologists agreed that human impacts on the Earth are dramatic enough to merit a new epoch name—but they also argued that such an epoch should start thousands of years ago, rather than focusing on a relatively sudden planetwide change.


Via Dorian Q Fuller
diana buja's insight:
Dorian Q Fuller's insight:

A more theory discussion of this is diserved, but this news peice highlights the fact that archaeologists are starting to engage with an issue that in geography and earth sciences is a big issue: human activities across the Holocene have been modifying environments, increasingly, and plausibly also modifying greenhouse gas levels, prior to the industrial era. It is about time more archaeologists took an active roll in these discussions. (See also Ruddiman's recent review (http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-earth-050212-123944 ;), and my past blogs: http://archaeobotanist.blogspot.co.uk/search/label/anthropogenic

[The image above is from Ruddiman 2013]

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Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, April 23, 2013 12:51 PM

A more theory discussion of this is diserved, but this news peice highlights the fact that archaeologists are starting to engage with an issue that in geography and earth sciences is a big issue: human activities across the Holocene have been modifying environments, increasingly, and plausibly also modifying greenhouse gas levels, prior to the industrial era. It is about time more archaeologists took an active roll in these discussions. (See also Ruddiman's recent review (http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-earth-050212-123944 ;), and my past blogs: http://archaeobotanist.blogspot.co.uk/search/label/anthropogenic

[The image above is from Ruddiman 2013]

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Food Aid as Industrial Policy - Cato Institute (blog)

Food Aid as Industrial Policy - Cato Institute (blog) | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
Food Aid as Industrial Policy
Cato Institute (blog)
In practice, after becoming a government program, the idea of giving food to poor people has been turned into an industrial policy tool.

Via Jeremy Cherfas
diana buja's insight:
Jeremy Cherfas's insight:

absolutely nothing unexpected here. The big win will be if the change in US aid policy actually has some impact on the ground, stimulating local producers and markets. And will there be any effort to stimulate nutrition rather than just calories?

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Jeremy Cherfas's curator insight, April 22, 2013 2:43 AM

absolutely nothing unexpected here. The big win will be if the change in US aid policy actually has some impact on the ground, stimulating local producers and markets. And will there be any effort to stimulate nutrition rather than just calories?

diana buja's curator insight, April 24, 2013 10:24 AM
Jeremy Cherfas's insight: absolutely nothing unexpected here. The big win will be if the change in US aid policy actually has some impact on the ground, stimulating local producers and markets. And will there be any effort to stimulate nutrition rather than just calories?
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The Anthropocene - Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, 41(1):

The Anthropocene - Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, 41(1): | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

The start of the period of large-scale human effects on this planet (the Anthropocene) is debated. The industrial view holds that most significant impacts have occurred since the early industrial era (1850), whereas the early-anthropogenic view recognizes large impacts thousands of years earlier. This review focuses on three indices of global-scale human influence: forest clearance (and related land use), emissions of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4), and effects on global temperature. Because reliable, systematic land-use surveys are rare prior to 1950, most reconstructions for early-industrial centuries and prior millennia are hind casts that assume humans have used roughly the same amount of land per person for 7,000 years. But this assumption is incorrect. Historical data and new archeological databases reveal much greater per-capita land use in preindustrial than in recent centuries. This early forest clearance caused much greater preindustrial greenhousegas emissions and global temperature changes than those proposed within the industrial paradigm.


Via Dorian Q Fuller
diana buja's insight:
Dorian Q Fuller's insight:

An excellent updated review on the early anthropogenic greenhouse gas hypothesis by William Ruddiman. nicekly illustrated, including some nice reuse of the maps and data in our Holocene paper on Rice, cows and methane (Fuller & al 2011)

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Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, April 23, 2013 12:53 PM

An excellent updated review on the early anthropogenic greenhouse gas hypothesis by William Ruddiman. nicekly illustrated, including some nice reuse of the maps and data in our Holocene paper on Rice, cows and methane (Fuller & al 2011)

Dorian Q Fuller's comment, April 29, 2013 4:12 PM
Should be read alongside the PNAs article "used planet" ( http://sco.lt/4p3yfB )
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The History of the Peoples of the Eastern Desert

The History of the Peoples of the Eastern Desert | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
The last quarter century has seen extensive research on the ports of the Red Sea coast of Egypt, the road systems connecting them to the Nile, and the mines and quarries in the region.

Via Dorian Q Fuller
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Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, April 23, 2013 1:09 PM

Looks like a very useful edited volume, with updated evidence to better understand the Neolithic, Pan-Grave and Blemmye cultures in Nubia in relation to their desert relations. Also a nicve chapter on tradition management of Wadi vegetation.

diana buja's comment, April 24, 2013 8:42 AM
Yes - this is an excellent book covering recent research, and I'm hoping also it will comeout in an e-book.
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Can You Identify These Plants from Ancient Egypt?

Can You Identify These Plants from Ancient Egypt? | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
Plants of all kinds were much beloved in ancient Egypt, and here is a selection  from tiles, tombs and wall inscriptions.  Can you identify them?  Over the next few days I will put up a blog giving...
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Eve Emshwiller's curator insight, April 22, 2013 6:18 PM

A great collection of beautiful pictures! 

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Kees van der Spek , "The Modern Neighbors of Tutankhamun History, Life, and Work in the Villages of the Theban West Bank"

Kees van der Spek , "The Modern Neighbors of Tutankhamun History, Life, and Work in the Villages of the Theban West Bank" | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

 The American University in Cairo Press, 2011, 532 p.

 

"A historical–anthropological study of the people who lived in the antiquities precinct of Luxor’s West Bank Until their recent demolition, the colorful mud-brick hamlets of al-Qurna village, situated among the Noble Tombs of the Theban Necropolis on the Luxor West Bank, were home to a vibrant community. Inhabiting a place of intensive Egyptological research for over two centuries, it was inevitable that Qurnawis should become part of the history of Egyptology and the development of archaeological practice in the Theban Necropolis. But they have mostly been regarded as laborers for the excavation teams or dealers in the illicit antiquities trade. The modern people inhabiting the ancient burial grounds have themselves rarely been considered. By demonstrating the multiplicity of economic activities that are carried out in al-Qurna, this study counters the villagers’ stereotypical representation as tomb robbers, and restores an understanding of who they are as people living their lives in the shadow of valued cultural heritage." (présentation de l'éditeur)


Via Egypt-actus, Zeta Xekalaki
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The Princess and the Gene Pool: The Plantagenet rebel who held the secret to Richard III’s DNA

The Princess and the Gene Pool: The Plantagenet rebel who held the secret to Richard III’s DNA | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
Richard III is perhaps the most controversial figure in British history and historians will long be discussing what new light the finds cast on his story.
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US museum unwrapping mummy's story with CT scan

US museum unwrapping mummy's story with CT scan | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
Using modern technology, a Virginia museum is working to unwrap the story behind one of the earliest surviving Egyptian mummies.
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Modern mummification sheds light on Ramses II

Modern mummification sheds light on Ramses II | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
Some millennia ago, Yes might have been the object of worship in ancient Egypt.
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