Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond
3.6K views | +2 today
Follow
Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond
Pre-modern for Africa, North Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond
Curated by diana buja
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

Stuffed Animals and Pickled Heads: The Culture and Evolution of Natural History Museums - Evening All Afternoon

Stuffed Animals and Pickled Heads: The Culture and Evolution of Natural History Museums - Evening All Afternoon | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

Wish I could get this book:

"If I have ever read a book that struck such an elegant balance between philosophical inquiry and sordid fascination with the grotesque as Stephen Asma's Stuffed Animals and Pickled Heads, I certainly don't remember it. Asma's exploration of the evolution of modern-day natural history museums, from their primitive ancestors the medieval bestiaries, through Renaissance curiosity cabinets and the private, Enlightenment-era collections of proto-scientists, is perceptive and thought-provoking at every turn. It points out the moral and philosophical implications of curatorial decisions: things that are normally invisible to museum visitors, but which subtly (and sometimes not so subtly) communicate the agendas of their designers. It examines a selection of 18th-, 19th- and 20th-century curated collections...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

Critic’s pick: Ramadan jingle is 6,000 years old | Egypt Independent

Critic’s pick: Ramadan jingle is 6,000 years old | Egypt Independent | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

“Wahawy ya wahawy/Eyaha/We kaman wahawy/Eyaha” — these are the introductory lyrics of our most popular Ramadan jingle. My brother and I have been singing them since we were 3 years old...

These lyrics, which songwriter Hussein Helmy al-Manesterly developed into a complete song that was composed and sung by Ahmed Abdel Kader and Ahmed Sherif, are actually inspired by a popular ancient Egyptian rhyme.

It is said that Egyptians first sang “Wahawy ya wahawy/Eyaha” when they visited Eyaha, the mother of King Ahmose I, and cheered for her son’s victory over the Hyksos who occupied Egypt for about 100 years.

King Ahmose I, the founder of the 18th dynasty, expelled the Hyksos only five years after he ruled Egypt in 1550 BC at the age of 16. The story goes that whenever the people saw Queen Eyaha, whose name meant “moon,” they would sing “Wahawy, Eyaha,” meaning “Welcome, Ehaya.”

Ever since, Egyptians have used the same song to celebrate different occasions. As the Islamic hijri calendar follows the lunar system, Egyptians living in the Fatimid era, from AD 969 to 1171, started to celebrate the beginning of the holy month of Ramadan by singing “Wahawy, Eyaha” — a tradition that has continued today.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

Pyramid Hieroglyphs Likely Engineering Numbers : Discovery News

Pyramid Hieroglyphs Likely Engineering Numbers : Discovery News | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

Markings in red paint found within the Great Pyramid by a camera-toting robot are likely numerals used by builders.

Shown to the world last month, when the first report of a robot exploration of the Great Pyramid was published in the Annales du Service Des Antiquities de l'Egypte (ASAE), the images revealed features that have not been seen by human eyes since the construction of the monument.

Researchers were particularly intrigued by three red ochre figures painted on the floor of a hidden chamber at the end of a tunnel deep inside the pyramid.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diana buja from Africa and Beyond
Scoop.it!

The Archaeology News Network: Evolution highly predictable for insects eating toxic plants

The Archaeology News Network: Evolution highly predictable for insects eating toxic plants | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

Similar processes with a certain breed of goat that inhabits extremely arid regions of n.e. Africa - ability to eat 'toxic' plants.  Not much else available.

 

A study published online July 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds that in the case of insects that developed resistance to a powerful plant toxin, the same adaptations have occurred independently, in separate species in different places and times. 

The paper examines 18 insect species across four orders -- beetles, butterflies and moths, flies, and true bugs -- that all feed on plants containing powerful toxins called cardenolides. 

Common to milkweeds and foxglove, cardenolides are lethal to nearly all insects and function effectively as a defense against pests. Cardenolides work by binding to a cell's sodium pump, one of the most fundamental systems found in all animal cells. The sodium pump works when an essential enzyme (Na,K-ATPase) carries important elements, sodium and potassium, across the cell membrane. Cardenolides bind to the enzyme and disable it, thereby shutting down cells, which results in severe damage. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

5,000-year-old wooden boat used by the pharaohs is discovered by French archaeologists

5,000-year-old wooden boat used by the pharaohs is discovered by French archaeologists | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

The significant discovery was made in Abu Rawash, west of Cairo, the antiquities ministry said. The six-metre long and 1.5-metre wide boat is believed to be in good condition. 

 

Very exciting.  It's dated from the Pharaoh Den, Dynasty I (ca. 3200 BC).  Solar boats were to be used in navigating the heavens, after death.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

Late Minoan IB destructions not followed by Mycenaean immigration

Late Minoan IB destructions not followed by Mycenaean immigration | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

... the Cranial Indices for all the above-mentioned Central Cretan population samples are plotted in chronological order, from the Early to Late Bronze Age. Cranial Indices were calculated separately for males and ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

How Do Older Things End Up Buried Under Newer Ones? - ScienceBlogs (blog)

How Do Older Things End Up Buried Under Newer Ones? - ScienceBlogs (blog) | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
How Do Older Things End Up Buried Under Newer Ones?ScienceBlogs (blog)This means that when they backfill the grave, they leave a number of redeposited Neolithic and Bronze Age artefact fragments on top of the Iron Age land surface.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

Africa Heritage Society — Blog — Africa 2012 – When minds meet ...

Africa Heritage Society — Blog — Africa 2012 – When minds meet ... | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
The colonial system had to be exclusive for it to deliver the promise to a few. Unemployment, therefore, took a racial character and the post-colonial experience has not been able to change the character of unemployment.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diana buja from World Neolithic
Scoop.it!

Oldest Neolithic bow discovered in Europe

Oldest Neolithic bow discovered in Europe | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
Researchers have discovered the oldest Neolithic bow in Europe at La Draga Neolithic site in Banyoles. The complete bow measures 108 cm long and was constructed of yew wood.

Via Lemercier Olivier
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

The Archaeology News Network: More on Ancient Human ancestors had unique diet

The Archaeology News Network: More on Ancient Human ancestors had unique diet | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

because the teeth had not been exposed to the elements since death, they also harbored another thing not discovered before in early hominins -- areas of preserved tartar buildup around the edges of the teeth. In this plaque, the scientists found phytoliths, bodies of silica from plants eaten almost 2 million years ago by these early hominids.

"It's the first time we've been able to look at these three things in one or two specimens," Ungar said.

Using the isotope analysis, the dental microwear analysis and the phytolith analysis, the researchers closed in on the diet of these two individuals, and what they found differs from other early human ancestors from that period. The microwear on the teeth showed more pits and complexity than most other australopiths before it. Like the microwear, the isotopes also showed that the animals were consuming mostly parts of trees, shrubs or herbs rather than grasses.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

The Archaeology News Network: World's oldest purse found in Germany

The Archaeology News Network: World's oldest purse found in Germany | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

Excavators at a site near Leipzig (map) uncovered more than a hundred dog teeth arranged close together in a grave dated to between 2,500 and 2,200 B.C.

According to archaeologist Susanne Friederich, the teeth were likely decorations for the outer flap of a handbag.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

The Archaeology News Network: Iraq cuts U.S. archaeology cooperation over archives

The Archaeology News Network: Iraq cuts U.S. archaeology cooperation over archives | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

Alaa Jassim works on a damaged document at the Iraq National Library and Archives in Baghdad on June 20. A trove of Jewish books and other materials rescued from a sewage-filled Baghdad basement during the 2003 invasion and now stored at the National Archives and Records Administration in College Park, Md., is now caught up in a tug-of-war between the U.S. and Iraq [Credit:. Khalid Mohammed/AP] The fate of the archives, which were removed from Iraq following the 2003 U.S.-led invasion, is a long-running point of contention between Washington and Baghdad, which has for years sought their return.

Smaisim, a member of powerful anti-U.S. cleric Moqtada al-Sadr’s movement, said in an interview with AFP that Iraq will use “all the means” to pursue the return of the archives.

“One of the means of pressure that I used against the American side is I stopped dealing with the American (archaeological) exploration missions because of the case of the Jewish archives and the antiquities that are in the United States,” said Smaisim.

“The American side made many moves and pressure (for Iraq) to resume work with them but this is a final decision,” he added.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

The Archaeology News Network: Ancient Human ancestors had unique diet

The Archaeology News Network: Ancient Human ancestors had unique diet | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

The study indicated that Australopithecus sediba -- a short, gangly hominid that lived in South Africa -- ate harder foods than other early hominids, targeting trees, bushes and fruits. In contrast, virtually all other ancient human ancestors tested from Africa -- including Paranthropus boisei, dubbed "Nutcracker Man" because of its massive jaws and teeth -- focused more on grasses and sedges, said CU-Boulder doctoral student Paul Sandberg, a co-author on the new study.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

Read Stuffed Animals & Pickled Heads: The Culture and Evolution of Natural History Museums | Questia, Your Online Research Library

Stuffed Animals & Pickled Heads: The Culture and Evolution of Natural History Museums Read

 In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries American and European museums primarily concerned themselves with educating the public about the theory of evolution, explaining the principles and displaying the evidence. Currently, a significant amount of museum space is still given over to the pedagogy of evolution. We are so accustomed to evolutionary displays that we often fail to appreciate their underlying logic. Stepping back and examining one's own paradigm is, after all, almost as hard as tasting one's own tongue. As we saw in chapters 3 and 4, organizing and displaying specimens is a way of visualizing the invisible, of making ideas palpable. There are rich invisible cultures that, if analyzed properly, emerge out of the material culture of contemporary evolution exhibits...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

IFAO - Abou Roach

IFAO - Abou Roach | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

Cette nécropole royale permet d’étudier l’évolution de l’architecture et de la décoration des tombeaux d’élite à une époque peu documentée jusqu’ici, celle du règne de Rêdjedef, coincée entre les deux géants Khéops et Khéphren. Les critères de datation récoltés sur le site, qui prennent en compte l’ensemble du contexte archéologique (de la céramique à la décoration), permettront d’avancer dans les débats houleux qui concernent la date de nombreux tombeaux de l’Ancien Empire, à Gîza en particulier, où tant de mastabas ont été placés, à tort, à la VIe dynastie. Les analyses menées sur l’architecture des tombeaux livrent en outre des données nouvelles sur leurs principes structurels (coffrage, compartimentage, stratification), qu’il faudrait comparer aux autres nécropoles pour lesquelles ce type d’études fait presque entièrement défaut.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

The Archaeology News Network: US.-Iranian team to conduct underwater excavation in Persian Gulf

The Archaeology News Network: US.-Iranian team to conduct underwater excavation in Persian Gulf | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diana buja from Africa and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Reconstructing the diet of African hominid Australopithecus anamensis

Reconstructing the diet of African hominid Australopithecus anamensis | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

The diet of Australopithecus anamensis, a hominid that lived in the east of the African continent more than 4 million years ago, was very specialized and, according to a new study, it included foods typical of open environments (seeds, sedges,...

 

Traditionally, the reconstruction of the diet of Australopithecus anamensis was carried out by means of indirect evidence (specifically, studies of microstructure and enamel thickness, and the dental size and morphology). In this new study, the team of the UB analyzes the pattern of microstriation of the post-canine dentition, from microscopic traces that some structural components of plants (phytoliths) and other external elements (sand, dust, etc.) leave in the dental enamel during the chewing of food. It is, therefore, a direct analysis of the result of the interaction of the diet with the teeth.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

Cave Yields Early Record of Domestic Animals

Cave Yields Early Record of Domestic Animals | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

The cave, in the northwestern part of the country, contains stone and bone tools, beads and pendants, pieces of pottery, and the bones of many animals — guinea fowl, ostriches, monitor lizards, tortoises, impala, rock hyraxes and various rodents

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

Pre-colonial Ethnic Institutions and Contemporary African ...

Pre-colonial Ethnic Institutions and Contemporary African ... | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
We investigate the role of deeply-rooted pre-colonial ethnic institutions in shaping comparative regional development within African countries. We combine information on the spatial distribution of ethnicities before ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

Soldiers battle badgers on Salisbury Plain as innovative project reveals Anglo ... - Culture24

Soldiers battle badgers on Salisbury Plain as innovative project reveals Anglo ... - Culture24 | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
Soldiers battle badgers on Salisbury Plain as innovative project reveals Anglo ...Culture24Operation Nightingale, an investigation into Bronze Age deposits at the Barrow Clump monument, found the male buried with a bronze shield.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

Feathered saurians: Downy dinosaur discovered

Feathered saurians: Downy dinosaur discovered | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
The new fossil find from the chalk beds of the Franconian Jura evokes associations with a pet cemetery, for the young predatory dinosaur reveals clear traces of fluffy plumage. It also poses an intriguing question: were all dinosaurs dressed in down?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by diana buja from World Neolithic
Scoop.it!

Early Pottery at 20,000 Years Ago in Xianrendong Cave, China

Early Pottery at 20,000 Years Ago in Xianrendong Cave, China | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

The invention of pottery introduced fundamental shifts in human subsistence practices and sociosymbolic behaviors. Here, we describe the dating of the early pottery from Xianrendong Cave, Jiangxi Province, China, and the micromorphology of the stratigraphic contexts of the pottery sherds and radiocarbon samples.

The radiocarbon ages of the archaeological contexts of the earliest sherds are 20,000 to 19,000 calendar years before the present, 2000 to 3000 years older than other pottery found in East Asia and elsewhere.

The occupations in the cave demonstrate that pottery was produced by mobile foragers who hunted and gathered during the Late Glacial Maximum. These vessels may have served as cooking devices. The early date shows that pottery was first made and used 10 millennia or more before the emergence of agriculture.


Via Lemercier Olivier
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

The Archaeology News Network: Scientists recover part of the genome of 2 hunter-gatherer individuals from 7,000 years ago

The Archaeology News Network: Scientists recover part of the genome of 2 hunter-gatherer individuals from 7,000 years ago | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

The Archaeology News Network: Spanish site yields oldest bow in Europe

The Archaeology News Network: Spanish site yields oldest bow in Europe | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

The site at La Draga is exceptional for several reasons. Firstly, due to its antiquity, which is considered to be one of the oldest of the Neolithic period existing in the Iberian Peninsula. Secondly, because it is an open-air site with a fairly continuous occupation. Lastly, and surely most remarkably, because of its exceptional conditions in which it is conserved.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by diana buja
Scoop.it!

The Archaeology News Network: More on Neolithic farm field found in South Korea

The Archaeology News Network: More on Neolithic farm field found in South Korea | Pre-Modern Africa, the Middle East - and Beyond | Scoop.it

This May 25, 2012 photo released by South Korea's Cultural Heritage Administration shows the remains of an old farm house in Goseong, 150 kilometers (93.2 miles) east of Seoul, South Korea. Archaeologist Cho Mi-soon said Wednesday, June, 27, 2012, that South Korea's archaeological agency found the remains of a farming field from the Neolithic period on South Korea's east coast. The site may be up to 5,600 years old which is more than 2,000 years older than what is now the second-oldest known site, which also is in South Korea. The white lines drawn with paint on the ground indicate the outline of where the house once stood, according to Administration officials [Credit: AP/Cultural Heritage Administration]

more...
No comment yet.