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'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it

"One-third of the seafood Americans catch is sold abroad, but most of the seafood we eat here is imported and often of lower quality. Why? Author Paul Greenberg says it has to do with American tastes."


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HazelAnne Prescott's insight:

Seems like a messed up system.  We do not have "taste"

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 9, 2014 8:00 PM

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 


Tagsfood production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.

Abigail Mack's curator insight, July 31, 2014 11:27 AM

What would make Americans opt for the lower quality, imported fish?

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Mount Moriah: The most contested real estate on Earth?

Mount Moriah: The most contested real estate on Earth? | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it

"Muslims call it the Noble Sanctuary. Jews and Christians call it the Temple Mount." 

 

What happens when various religious groups claim the same territory as their own?


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Mrs. B's curator insight, February 10, 2014 9:08 AM

#Jerusalem

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 14, 2014 11:35 AM

This article and picture points out just how hard it is to “solve” the problems in Israel.  The constant overlapping of buildings on holy sites complicates the issues more than anything political ever could.  Belief is one of the biggest driving forces for conflict in the world and this illustration reminds us of that.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 2014 1:54 PM

In some of the oldest civilizations on earth, religion is the most important aspect of life. There will always be extreme conflicts in these ancient areas all over religion.

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Land Unseen: What's Beneath Antarctica's Ice?

Land Unseen: What's Beneath Antarctica's Ice? | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it
Peel back the snow and ice and explore the planet's most remote continent.
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1/5 of Humanity

1/5 of Humanity | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it

"The world divided into 5 regions, each with the population of China."


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, September 11, 2013 3:10 PM

Your thoughts...?

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:42 AM

This map is mind blowning to try to grasp. To think that India has an equvilant population to every country in the Americans has me dumbfounded. Then comparin the economic instability of India to all the economic juggernauts that fit into the light blue regions really shows how poor the distrubution of wealth and population is throught the world.

Trish Pearson's curator insight, April 9, 2014 3:33 PM

A little perspective on population

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


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Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 2014 10:04 AM

Maybe the world  being overpopulated is a good thing. In the video it explains how all of our resources wont run out they will just need to be increased. The way we live and what we live off of is much different than what other people have to live off of.  We have all of these resources to spare that as people bring more children into this world we will have plenty to share. The world is a place to  farm,  to be able to provide for your families,  to live your everyday life without having to worry about dying from diseases. So if the world becomes overpopulated it will force people to move to a better inhabitant.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:24 PM

Although this is a very long video, it provides extremely important facts about the explosion of population growth, the history and background behind it all, countries and states at risk, already occurring issues and possible solutions to these rising problems. - UNIT 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:21 AM

Most of you have watched this - have a quick recap. Can you use this in any of your answers to exam questions? 

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Infant Mortality Rates

Infant Mortality Rates | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it
Are All Mothers Created Equal? From the State of the World's Mothers 2012 report see how mothers locations have an impact on the life and death of their children.

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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 2014 4:04 PM

Population unit

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 1:51 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This video was about how demographers categorize data and analyze it. This video showed a few different population pyramids in order to show differences in population in different countries. It showed China as an example and pointed out the remnants of the one child policy 35 years before and how the number of men were higher due to sex selective abortions. They also talked about how the population pyramids could show what stage in the demographic transition model a country was in and how they use them to predict future patterns and changes. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it covers topics such as population change, demographic transition models, sex composition, population policies and much more. Population pyramids are very useful due to the visualization of sex, age and number composition in a countries population. They are very important in the use of predicting the future change in population because it can tell what the population has gone through in the past and what to expect in the DTM. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 10:43 PM

This video illustrates how population pyramids have the ability to show how populations will rise and fall over time. Pyramids specifically show the population based on a specific age, and illustrates a country's amount of young people in comparison to the elderly. 

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The New Map of the Middle East

The New Map of the Middle East | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it
Why should we fight the inevitable break-up of Iraq?

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Michael Amberg's curator insight, March 23, 8:50 PM

the map shows how badly we drew the original lines during the berlin conference, and how if we were to redo the lines today, it would look like this.

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Nigeria military studies Sri Lankan tactics for use against Boko Haram

Nigeria military studies Sri Lankan tactics for use against Boko Haram | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it
Nigeria is studying the military tactics used by Sri Lanka to crush the rebel Tamil Tigers for its own battle against Islamist group Boko Haram, the defense ministry said, after holding talks with officials from the island nation.

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Sephardic Jews hope to return to Spain

Sephardic Jews hope to return to Spain | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it
Spain plans to allow Jews expelled during the Inquisition a fast-track to citizenship - so would they take it?

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Number of children in Japan drops for 33rd year

Number of children in Japan drops for 33rd year | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it
The number of children 14 and under has fallen for the 33rd consecutive year to a record low of 16.33 million as of April 1, the government said Sunday, reflecting ...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 15, 2014 11:21 PM

This is why Japan's impending demographic crunch is such a pressing concern to policy makers...

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Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn

Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it
During summer, the sun never sets in Sweden's northernmost town, posing challenges for Muslims observing the holy month.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 8, 2014 12:29 PM

Like many early religious traditions, Ramadan is observed based on measurements from the moon and sun. The start of Ramadan is determined by the sighting of the new moon, which  moves about 11 days back in the Gregorian calendar each year. During Ramadan the consumption of food and water is prohibited between dawn and dusk, how do Muslims observing the fast manage in the far north of Scandinavia, where the sun never sets?  When Ramadan falls in December, however, Muslims will face the opposite of midnight sun: polar night. For two weeks, the sun does not rise above the horizon.

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Chinese Uyghurs defy Ramadan ban

Chinese Uyghurs defy Ramadan ban | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it

"The government's attempt to clamp down on religious expression has backfired among Uyghurs."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:04 PM

APHG-U3

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:58 PM

This article is inspiring in that it shows cultural minority groups defending their cultures and religions

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 4:19 PM

Chinese efforts to suppress religion and extremism in western China have had an opposite effect, with the people often disregarding laws and efforts against practicing Islam. Celebrating Ramadan and bringing children to a mosque are technically illegal, but it has pushed people to make an effort of involving their children. It is an effort to counter the Chinese push to wipe the regions traditions and culture away, but has created an effort by the people to pass on their culture. Even the law limiting children is widely ignored as it does not fit with the locals beliefs.

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Visualizing Time and Space

Visualizing Time and Space | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it

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sriddle geo's curator insight, July 24, 2014 9:04 AM

Once again the educator in me is at work.  My little girl is asking me all the time , "If it's day here is it night on the other side of the world?"  Now I can show her.

Cory Erlandson's curator insight, July 24, 2014 9:48 AM

Great spatial representation of time and time zones, which is a weirdly fascinating topic for my students.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:00 PM

APHG-U1

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National cemeteries create a 'sacred grove' of equality

National cemeteries create a 'sacred grove' of equality | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it
In the end, rank falls away

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Expert's comment, November 11, 2013 6:42 AM
Hi, I'd be happy if you visit my site? http://oyunskor.toretto.org
Caren Izzo's curator insight, November 11, 2013 11:09 AM

Veterans' Day today.  Thank a vet for their service.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 11, 2013 12:44 PM

If you have never visited a veterans cemetery, I think it is important to go and just visit even if you do not have a realtive there.  These men and women gave their lives for us in one way or another.  No matter what creed, what belief or which religion they followed all are treated with same care.  If you really want to see an amazing site goto a US Military Cemetery overseas.  These gaves are maitained by the locals, French, Italians, Ducth, etc.  They keep them neat, clean, with flowers and make sure our soldiers that died for them are not forgotten.  The one overlooking Normandy is amazing.  I have had the privledge to visit the US Cemetary near Rome and the feeling you get...well undescribable.   Take a look here for a view of these cemeteries.  http://www.abmc.gov/cemeteries/index.php

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Urbanization of Africa Could Boost Heart Disease, Diabetes Rates - Counsel & Heal

Urbanization of Africa Could Boost Heart Disease, Diabetes Rates - Counsel & Heal | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it
Counsel & Heal
Urbanization of Africa Could Boost Heart Disease, Diabetes Rates
Counsel & Heal
Increasing urbanization of rural areas in sub-Saharan Africa could lead to increased cases of heart disease and diabetes, a new study has found.
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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:21 PM

A straightforward map that puts previous knowledge (of the rapidly growing population and the limited food supply) into prescriptive. -UNIT 2

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Will saving poor children lead to overpopulation?

Hans Rosling explains a very common misunderstanding about the world. CC by www.gapminder.org

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 27, 2014 8:05 AM

Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining population, demographicsmodels, gapminderdevelopment.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 28, 2014 6:18 PM

A clear explanation of how saving the poor will slow population growth.

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The Next America

The Next America | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.

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CB New Hire Onboarding's curator insight, April 25, 2014 9:35 AM

"The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs." - Seth Dixon 

Amanda Morgan's comment, September 18, 2014 10:46 AM
The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:48 AM

The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.

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Same place, different perspective

Same place, different perspective | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 19, 2014 8:53 AM

A new perspective can change our perception of reality, as demonstrated by this delightful photo gallery.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, March 23, 10:15 PM

This really shows how peoples perception of things arn't truly as they seem

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Illinois ranked second flattest state, and flattest is not Kansas

Illinois ranked second flattest state, and flattest is not Kansas | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of Kansas say the terrain makes Illinois is the second-flattest state in the country, behind a very surprising frontrunner.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 20, 2014 9:42 AM

In popular imagination, nothing could possibly be flatter than Kansas.  It's ingrained in our cultural perception of place and facts don't always line up with our imagined geographies.  You can see why researchers from Kansas  would want to combat this myth, but it's pervasiveness will be tough to supplant generations worth of people hearing and tacitly accepting this narrative.   

His research compared how flat people think states are, versus how flat the states actually are.

The team determined how flat states are by breaking each state up into small sections and analyzing the elevation in those sections.

One-third of the people Dobson initially surveyed said they thought Kansas was the flattest state. But Dobson’s team found low-lying coastal plains make Florida the flattest in the land.

“I know that the flattest place I’ve ever seen is central Illinois,” Dobson told the Chicago Tribune.

His team found Illinois was not only flatter than Kansas, but also flatter than North Dakota, Louisiana and Minnesota.

Iowa ranked as the 18th flattest state, and 64% of the state is not flat.

Kansas ranked seventh-flattest in the study. The least flat state was West Virginia.

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Topics: illinois

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Mary Barra, CEO of General Motors
Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook
Michelle Obama, First Lady of the U.S.
Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo
Meg Whitman, CEO of HP
Hillary Clinton, former U.S. Secretary of State
Sarah Palin, conservative commentator & former Alaska Governor
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The Islamic State: Why mainstream media didn't see it coming

The Islamic State: Why mainstream media didn't see it coming | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it
The Islamic State has been quick to exploit the gap in mainstream media reporting on the violence in Iraq.

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Liberals Eat Here. Conservatives Eat There.

Liberals Eat Here. Conservatives Eat There. | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it
Can you tell a person's politics based on where they buy their groceries or hamburger? Here's one gauge of how liberal or conservative customers are at America's chain restaurants, fast-food establishments and supermarkets.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 2014 12:12 PM

Years ago before the whole "Marriage Equality vs. Chick-Fil-A" snafu, I was outside of Baltimore on a road trip.  As my family pulled of the interstate there were two options food options: Panera Bread and Chick-Fil-A.  My 3 kids couldn't care less about Foccacia, so I took them to Chick-Fil-A while me wife got something at Panera.  Although these establishment were adjacent to each other they occupied radically different social spaces and distinct ethnic networks and speculated that the political affiliations of customers would also be difference.  This observation is supported by the data in this article that shows that certain restaurants attract (cater to?) a clientele that is either more conservative or more liberal.    

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This Woman Had Her Face Photoshopped In Over 25 Countries To Examine Global Beauty Standards

This Woman Had Her Face Photoshopped In Over 25 Countries To Examine Global Beauty Standards | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it
Through her work, Esther Honig hopes to discover if a global beauty standard actually exists.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 26, 2014 2:05 PM

Is there a 'universal' beauty?  How is beauty constructed within societies?  Why are their differences between societies on what is beautiful?   

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Nine Nations of North America, 30 Years Later - NYTimes.com

Nine Nations of North America, 30 Years Later - NYTimes.com | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it
A map based on culture and values does not reflect the perversely drawn state and national boundaries. By Joel Garreau.
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Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level

Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level | Pre-AP Geography | Scoop.it

"The largest reservoir in the U.S. falls to its lowest water level in history, Nevada State Sen. Tick Segerblom introduced a bill title and issued a press release on July 8 calling for an 'independent scientific and economic audit of the Bureau of Reclamation’s strategies for Colorado River management.'"

 

This week’s history-making, bad-news event at Lake Mead has already triggered lots of news stories, but almost all of these stories focus on the water supply for Las Vegas, Phoenix and California. But what about the health of the river itself?

 

Tags: physical, fluvial, drought, water, environment.


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 3:09 AM

Consequences of urbanisation 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 3:10 AM

Option topic : Inland water and management

Tom Franta's curator insight, July 12, 2014 11:40 AM

Many geographers are aware that future water resource issues in the American Southwest will have political, cultural, and social impacts.  What do you believe to be some approaching concerns after reading this article?