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Practical Application of Equine Science
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Shoulder In proper and inverted rotation

Shoulder In proper and inverted rotation | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
Educate your eye photos showing correct and incorrect shoulder in of the horse
Helyn Cornille's insight:

Even if the concept of rotation associated with lateral bending has been clearly explained in 1999 with Jean Marie Denoix’s magisterial work, the concept remains foreign to judging standards and most training techniques. The concept is important to know; proper or inverted rotation is often the difference between good and poor performance as well as soundness or limbs injuries and back issues. In practically all the rehabilitations that we have completed, the subject of inverted rotation was part of the problem. 

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Randi Thompson's curator insight, March 4, 8:13 AM

Check out this article and see what a correct shoulder in looks from the ground.  Can you see the difference easier now?

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How to Lunge a Horse/Chazot's Recovery - YouTube

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How to lunge a horse correctly

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The Power Of The Mind

The Power Of The Mind | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
Many apparently identical movements can be executed with different muscular combinations. This is why a horse can be crippled or rehabilitated by the same movement
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Equine Anatomy verses Equine Anatomy

Equine Anatomy verses Equine Anatomy | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
There are two types of horse’s anatomy, the one supporting the thought that lowering of the neck stretches upper neck and back muscles and the real horse’s anatomy which contradict such beliefs
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Xenophon 2014

Xenophon 2014 | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
If a dancer was forced to dance by whip and spikes, he would be no more beautiful than a horse trained under similar conditions.” (Xenophon)
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“Are you happy with your horse riding experience?”

“Are you happy with your horse riding experience?” | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
We here at Science of Motion provide to both trainers and riders, up to date, highly advanced, scientific methodology for those that wish to improve their riding and training without sacrificing the health of the horse.
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Overstepping the mark: the mystery of engagement - Featured, Focus, Training & Husbandry - Horsetalk.co.nz

Overstepping the mark: the mystery of engagement - Featured, Focus, Training & Husbandry - Horsetalk.co.nz | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
A complex mechanism is involved in hind leg engagement and the mastery of balance.
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Class-Sick

Class-Sick | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
Inverted rotation, which is illustrated on this picture with the red arrow, places the pelvis in the wrong inclination. The adduction of the inside hind leg is then stressing abnormally the cruciate ligaments of the stifle.
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Yes, winning is not everything.

Yes, winning is not everything. | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
Excerpts from book by Jean Luc Cornille, Yes, winning is not everything.
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Match The Frequency

Match The Frequency | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
Prior to 2003, when they started to investigate the plasticity of muscles function, they believed that muscles shortened and lengthened to move bones.
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The Science of Motion Work in Hand

The Science of Motion Work in Hand | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
This is the difference between biomechanics and pathomechanics.
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Chazot 38

Chazot 38 | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
Chazt a horse talks about training and abuse.
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“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius - and a lot of courage - to move in the opposite direction.” (Albert Einstein)


We were watching in complete silence. The scene outside of the barn scared us. Going back home from a lesson, the horse refused loading the trailer and the pressure escalated. They were shaking the lunge of the rope halter making the horse back up a few steps and then the other person was behind the horse shaking what looks like a dressage whip but thicker with a plastic bag attached at the end making the horse move forward. At first, I looked at the plastic bag thinking that it was a new technique for flying carrots. Often he comes in the barn with a plastic bag in his hands but the bag is full of carrots. This one was empty and Caesar explained. This is supposed to be a loading technique. They make you walk back and forth many times, they make you spin and back again, hoping that you will be so confused, or disoriented, or submitted, that you would rather load the trailer. They tried this type of rope halter with me and I hated it. These things are made of fine rope and when they pull on the lunge the halter gives the feeling of cutting into your poll. There are also two knots on the front part that put pressure on our facial nerves. I removed it in two minutes rubbing my head against my leg. Once I got rid of this junk, I was ready to load the trailer by myself just to give them a lesson, but these pretenders are so pretentious that they would have believed that I learned my lesson. I just walked back in my stall. Amazingly they tried a second time punishing me by shaking the lunge of this rope thing into my face. Now I was annoyed and I charged them throwing my front legs in their direction. They run away dropping the lunge and I removed the halter a second time. This time I stood in the corridor with my feet on their rope thing. They looked at me disconcerted. I did not fit their behavior theories. I was not supposed to react like that. They did not question the coherence of their behavior; they decided that my behavior was out of the norms. While they were arguing that I was too thick for their subtle training, I turned back into my stall deciding that they were to dumb for me.

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Chazot 37

Chazot 37 | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
Chazot a 18.1 hand OTTB discussing training with his many horse friends.
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The Miracles of the Science of Motion2

The Miracles of the Science of Motion2 | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
This is not the vertebral column of the horse that you can see on the video, but this specimen shows the thoracolumbar spine abnormality that leaded this horse to absolutely refuse any water jump. He was a “would be” Grand Prix jumper in the sense that he
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oversimplifications

oversimplifications | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
A formula such as over-tracking is the type of oversimplification that concentrates the riders’ attention on foot prints and lower legs movements, missing proper correlation between limbs movement and thoracolumbar spine mechanism
Helyn Cornille's insight:

A formula such as over-tracking is the type of oversimplification that concentrates the riders’ attention on foot prints and lower legs movements, missing proper correlation between limbs movement and thoracolumbar spine mechanism. Over-tracking is theoretically an engagement of the hind legs placing the foot print of the hind leg ahead of the print of the foreleg. In many instances, over-tracking is in fact a kinematics abnormality placing the push off of the foreleg too far back. The horse does not over-track because of greater engagement of the hind leg but instead because over loading of the forelegs and consequent backward shift of the forelegs’ stance.

Like for every kinematics study, we start with a “control” document used for comparison and reference. The “control” is the work of Eadweard Muybridge, “Animals in motion, 1899.” Muybridge pioneered the technique of photographic series. His work pictures average horses in motion. On this first series, the horse is at the trot. The picture series needs to be read from right to left. The two frames that interest us are the first and second frame of the upper line. The left hind leg is close from impact and then alights while the left foreleg moves out of the way into the swing phase


 


The picture shows a horse working heavy on the forehand. The picture has been taken a fraction of a second after Muybridge first frame and before Muybridge second frame. What is clearly apparent is how the forelegs adapt to excessive load. Even on Muybridge first frame, which is taken a fraction of a second before this picture, the left foreleg is already off the ground. By contrast, the left forelegs of the horse worked long and low and therefore heavy on the forehand, remains loaded on the ground. The heel just starts its upward motion. More push will be exerted on the toe before the hoof clears the ground. As a result, the left hind leg is not going to impact as much forward as Muybridge horse. As the left foreleg remains on the way, the adaptation of the left hind leg is, in this case, early

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Wear and Tear

Wear and Tear | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
Helyn Cornille's insight:

When the British team won the Dressage gold medal I was thinking, “The gold medal is in good hands.” Effectively, the gold medal is in good hands. Recently Olympian Richard Davison expressed concerns about the fact that some high-level dressage tests are causing too much wear and tear on the horses’ physique. It is refreshing that at the higher level, a rider is concerned about the physical demands that modern performances induce on the horses’ limbs and vertebral structures.   

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False practice 3

False practice 3 | Practical Application of Equine Science | Scoop.it
Helyn Cornille's insight:

This does no means that Pluvinel was wrong; the Master was using the best technique available at this time. What is wrong is still applying the technique when advanced understanding of the equine physiology has demonstrated their ineffectiveness as well as damaging effects. Alvin Toffler magisterially summarized the problem. “The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn

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Randi Thompson's curator insight, January 10, 9:28 AM

This is a wonderful article from Jean Luc Cornille that will give you a better understanding of a half pass and shoulder in.