Prøve
0 view | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Anne Steinbeck from Prøve
Scoop.it!

In Defense of Working Memory Training - Scientific American (blog)

In Defense of Working Memory Training - Scientific American (blog) | Prøve | Scoop.it
Scientific American (blog) In Defense of Working Memory Training Scientific American (blog) But equally as troublesome, the researchers didn't look at other crucial moderating variables such as personality, motivation, learning disabilities, mental...

Via Lou Salza, Anne Steinbeck
more...
Lou Salza's curator insight, April 17, 2013 10:20 AM

A fair treatment of the topic--but a weak defense of the training techniques most talked about in the media these days and most credited with unsubstantiated gains for those struggling with print, or wth focusing attention.--Lou

Excerpt:

".....Regardless of the method, however, it’s important to be realistic about the limits of brain training. Cook rightly notes that the effects of the large majority of working memory training programs don’t generalize well beyond the specific skills that are targeted. This is important to keep in mind. Working memory interventions may improve focus and attention to a large and meaningful degree, but they shouldn’t be expected to increase high-level critical reasoning skills or magically alleviate all of the symptoms of a learning disability. To improve logical and critical reasoning, one ought to actually engage in reasoning training. To reduce the symptoms of a learning disability, it’s important to engage in comprehensive interventions that specifically targets the symptoms (e.g., phonological decoding interventions for people with dyslexia).

It’s also important to keep in mind that regardless of the method, working memory improvements are transient. Repeated practice and challenge is essential to maintaining improvements in any kind of cognitive training or else they’ll very likely decline rapidly. This shouldn’t be shocking. You wouldn’t expect to go on a diet for 12 hours and maintain the one pound you lost the rest of your life. To keep growing and improving intellectually requires constant engagement in intellectually challenging material. To maintain improvements in focus and concentration requires getting in the habit of concentrating and manipulating complex material in your mind..."

 
Rescooped by Anne Steinbeck from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Scoop.it!

In Defense of Working Memory Training - Scientific American (blog)

In Defense of Working Memory Training - Scientific American (blog) | Prøve | Scoop.it
Scientific American (blog) In Defense of Working Memory Training Scientific American (blog) But equally as troublesome, the researchers didn't look at other crucial moderating variables such as personality, motivation, learning disabilities, mental...

Via Lou Salza
more...
Lou Salza's curator insight, April 17, 2013 10:20 AM

A fair treatment of the topic--but a weak defense of the training techniques most talked about in the media these days and most credited with unsubstantiated gains for those struggling with print, or wth focusing attention.--Lou

Excerpt:

".....Regardless of the method, however, it’s important to be realistic about the limits of brain training. Cook rightly notes that the effects of the large majority of working memory training programs don’t generalize well beyond the specific skills that are targeted. This is important to keep in mind. Working memory interventions may improve focus and attention to a large and meaningful degree, but they shouldn’t be expected to increase high-level critical reasoning skills or magically alleviate all of the symptoms of a learning disability. To improve logical and critical reasoning, one ought to actually engage in reasoning training. To reduce the symptoms of a learning disability, it’s important to engage in comprehensive interventions that specifically targets the symptoms (e.g., phonological decoding interventions for people with dyslexia).

It’s also important to keep in mind that regardless of the method, working memory improvements are transient. Repeated practice and challenge is essential to maintaining improvements in any kind of cognitive training or else they’ll very likely decline rapidly. This shouldn’t be shocking. You wouldn’t expect to go on a diet for 12 hours and maintain the one pound you lost the rest of your life. To keep growing and improving intellectually requires constant engagement in intellectually challenging material. To maintain improvements in focus and concentration requires getting in the habit of concentrating and manipulating complex material in your mind..."